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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 81 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 68 2 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 51 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 23 7 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Patton Anderson or search for Patton Anderson in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
e to General Bragg, in the Fall of 1867, when the events referred to were fresh in my memory. Some months afterwards I saw in his possession letters from General Patton Anderson, Colonel Urquhart and others who were conversant with the facts and participants like myself in the movement, all of which concurred with the principal st leaving Major-General Cleburne in command of the extreme right, moved toward the left when he heard the heavy firing in that direction. He reached the right of Anderson's division just in time to find it had nearly all fallen back, commencing on its right, where the enemy had first crowned the ridge. By a prompt and judicious mthe loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an autograph letter of General Bragg to Major E
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
concur with Colonel Anderson in his conclusions. General Bragg in his report of the battle of Chickamauga, refers to information received from me as in a great manner influencing him in his movement against the two divisions of Thomas in McLemore's Cove. Recently I found among my papers the rough draft of a letter written by me to General Bragg, in the Fall of 1867, when the events referred to were fresh in my memory. Some months afterwards I saw in his possession letters from General Patton Anderson, Colonel Urquhart and others who were conversant with the facts and participants like myself in the movement, all of which concurred with the principal statements in my letter. I give you a copy of what I wrote, and would call attention to the fact that General Hindman was placed under arrest for disobedience in not obeying Bragg's repeated orders to attack at an early hour on the 11th. I may add, that to make Hindman's attack from the direction of Chattanooga effective it was abs
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
eus of stragglers had been formed upon which to rally. Lieutenant-General Hardee, leaving Major-General Cleburne in command of the extreme right, moved toward the left when he heard the heavy firing in that direction. He reached the right of Anderson's division just in time to find it had nearly all fallen back, commencing on its right, where the enemy had first crowned the ridge. By a prompt and judicious movement, he threw a portion of Cheatham's division directly across the ridge, facingragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an autograph letter of General Bragg to Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Mississippi, dated Mobile, 8th of February, 1873: * * * *
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
st promoted) staff, who at this juncture was on sick leave in Virginia, and his brigade temporarily commanded by General Patton Anderson, recently deceased, we received instructions that by early dawn the next morning the left under Hardee (he and Pucky's brave and eloquent Roger Hanson was mortally wounded and soon after died. Walthall's brigade (commanded by Patton Anderson) was ordered to double-quick a distance of one and one-half miles, or thereabouts, to his support. Passing through y pursuing the retreating forces of Breckinridge. During the night and incident to the confusion on such occasions, General Anderson reported through me to his division commander, General Withers, that he could find no line to support—that there werline in his front. This was immediately dispatched to Army Headquarters, and soon thereafter a courier rode up to General Anderson's position with orders for his Assistant Adjutant General to report at army headquarters without delay. Following