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he care for the dead and wounded which was evinced by every person at the gun divisions. I regret to report the loss of seven most valuable men, namely: Bernard Sands, signal quartermaster, killed by your side; John Wade, captain after-guard; Thomas White, coxswain, captain of No. 9 gun; Andrew Rourke, seaman, first loader of pivot-gun; Daniel McEmory, boy, powder-boy of pivot-gun; Henry Roff, marine, of the marine-gun's crew No. 1; William Lanahan, marine, marine-gun's crew No. 2. Midshipman Anderson, your aid, was carried overboard early in the action, from the poop, by a round shot. No. 9 gun had, by the striking of a thirty-two-pound shot against the iron boat-davit on port-side, and breaking into fragments, immediately followed by a bursting shell in the same direction, first captain killed, second captain badly wounded, and nine men badly disabled, making eleven men out of the crew of seventeen. Still the remaining six fought the gun most gallantly until the end of the acti
r side is not known, but that of the enemy was supposed to be very large. A general engagement of the two armies is expected. The loss on both sides in the fight of yesterday was very heavy, ours believed to be not less than one thousand up to twelve o'clock. The enemy had up to that hour been driven back three times to within range of their gunboats. Later At a late hour last night we learned some further particulars of the fight on Monday. Gen. Early is mortally wounded. Gen. Anderson, of North-Carolina, we believe, killed. Col. Mott, of Mississippi, killed. Gen. Raines, slightly wounded. Capt. Echols, of Lynchburgh, slightly wounded. Capt. Irwin, of Scales's North-Carolina regiment, wounded. The First Virginia regiment was badly cut up. Out of two hundred men in the fight, some eighty or ninety are reported killed or wounded. Colonel Kemper's regiment suffered terribly, though we have no account of the extent of the casualties. We learn that Gen.
coming up. Our loss is thirty killed and two hundred and sixteen wounded. Of the loss of the enemy I am not informed; it is certain, however, that the Colonel of the Tenth Virginia was killed, as this report is confirmed by several prisoners we have taken. Our men were withdrawn at half-past 8 or nine o'clock, and we at once prepared to fall back toward reinforcements. We found it necessary to burn a quantity of hard bread and some ammunition. Many other things were lost. Our sutlers, Anderson and Harper, lost all their traps. I am sorry to say that, owing to some mismanagement on the part of Lieut.-Col. Constable, of the Seventy-fifth Ohio, (who had gone on to a house in advance, to await the arrival of our troops,) and his cousin, who was to notify him of the moving of the troops, but who failed to do it, he (the Colonel) was left behind and taken prisoner by the rebels. Of our retreat to this point and the incidents connected therewith, I will speak in my next. volunteer.
at point apparently with the intention of joining their squadron in the Roads. Before, however, we got within gun-shot, the enemy ceased firing, and retired with all speed under the protection of the guns of the fortress, followed by the Virginia, until the shells from the Rip Raps passed over her. The Virginia was then placed at her moorings near Sewell's Point, and I returned to Norfolk to hold the conference referred to. It was held on the ninth, and the officers pressent were, Col. Anderson and Capt.----, of the army, selected by Gen. Huger, who was too unwell to attend himself; and of the navy, myself, Corn. Hollins, and Capts. Sterrett and Lee, Commander Richard L. Jones, and Lieuts. Ap Catesby Jones and J. Pembroke Jones. The opinion was unanimous that the Virginia was then employed to the best advantage, and that she should continue, for the present, to protect Norfolk, and thus afford time to remove the public property. On the next day, at ten o'clock A. M., we
the enemy. During the night, a courier from Roger A. Pryor to Gen. Anderson, was captured by Richardson's pickets, with a note informing AnAnderson that Pryor's brigade was in line of battle on his right. We looked for an attack at daybreak, but the pickets were not driven in untilhe was posting a company, a rebel officer rode up inquiring for Gen. Anderson. Cross reached for his collar and brought him down on the run,ed by Generals Joe Johnston, Huger, Magruder, G. W. Smith Whiting, Anderson, and other educated generals, was massed on our left, and that ournt especially to the manner in which Brig.-Generals Whiting and R. H. Anderson, and Colonels Jenkins, and Kemper, and Hampton, exercising comms brigade led the advance. It was commanded on the occasion by Col. Anderson, the General being ill in the city. Garland's brigade commencet. Baker, of the Twenty-seventh Georgia, while acting as aid to Col. Anderson, was killed. Among the distinguished acts of daring on Satur
ing of Morell's division of volunteers, and Sykes's regulars, some five thousand strong, increased by Duryea's Zouaves, was posted near New-Bridge, within supporting distance. Gen. Stoneman had also been sent to Old Church with a regiment of cavalry and two of infantry as a corps of observation and to check flanking movements; or, if possible, to decoy the enemy down the Pamunkey. At about noon a powerful corps of the enemy, consisting of Gen. A. P. Hill's, D. H. Hill's, Longstreet's, and Anderson's divisions--then supposed to be Jackson's force--under command of Major-General Robert E. Lee, crossed the river at Mechanicsville bridge, Meadow bridge, and at Atlee's, and between one and two o'clock attacked our flank. Two regiments of Meade's brigade (McCall's division) were in reserve, and one on picket-duty. They did not at any time fully engage the enemy. General Reynolds's brigade held the right, and Seymour's the left. The fight was opened with artillery, at long range, but th
t come in says, Longstreet's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's to be destroyed for want of transportation. Anderson not yet up, and I hear nothing of those behine time the division of Generals McLaws and R. H. Anderson, moved from the vicinity of Frederick for ker. Meanwhile the divisions of McLaws and Anderson, after but little resistance, had become masthin easy range of the batteries of McLaws and Anderson on the opposite heights. Night coming on, th of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadier-General Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg;tely, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregorh Alabama; Major-General Anderson's, Brigadier-General Anderson's, and Brigadier-General Ripley's. ranch, of North-Carolina, killed. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. [2 more...]
and A. D.C. United States military telegraph. Received August 26, 1862. From near Waterloo Bridge, 8.45 P. M. To General Pope: Trains and troops still passing over the same route. A deserter just come in says, Longstreet's corps, embracing Anderson's, Jones's, Kemper's, Whitney's, and Evans's divisions, are located in the woods back of Waterloo Bridge; thinks Hill's division at Jefferson, Jackson's corps somewhere above Longstreet's. He appears truthful, and I credit his story. The entiremy has steadily advanced and repulsed the frequent attacks of the enemy. The line of the Rappahannock and Warrenton has been relieved. Many prisoners are captured, and I regret, quantities of stores to be destroyed for want of transportation. Anderson not yet up, and I hear nothing of those behind. We have Ewell, Trimble, and Taliaferro wounded — the latter slightly, the others not mortally. R. E. Lee. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, Grovetown, via Rapidan, August 30-10 P. M. To Pr
kson left Frederick on Thursday, taking the Hagerstown road, and at the same time the division of Generals McLaws and R. H. Anderson, moved from the vicinity of Frederick for the Maryland Heights, overlooking the town of Harper's Ferry. On Wednesday he (Gen. Jackson) got in position, of which he promised to notify Gen. Walker. Meanwhile the divisions of McLaws and Anderson, after but little resistance, had become masters of the Heights on the Maryland side, the enemy leaving them, and joined forces under Gen. Jackson, and the fight, which was desperate and determined, continued throughout the day — McLaws and Anderson shelling from the Maryland side. The enemy resisted with great spirit, and the guns, of which they had a large numberey had their heavy guns planted and strong intrenchments thrown up, but within easy range of the batteries of McLaws and Anderson on the opposite heights. Night coming on, the struggle ceased, Jackson's forces occupying the deserted intrenchments on
McFarland and Lieutenant Newman, of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; GeneBrigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in commanf the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates Hagin, Henry, Bryf Colonel Gordon's and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot's of Sixth Alabama; Major-General Anderson's, Brigadier-General Anderson's, and Brigadier-General Ripley's. I hBrigadier-General Anderson's, and Brigadier-General Ripley's. I have omitted to mention, in the proper place, that Major Robert S. Smith and Lieutenant Lewis Cobb, of the Fourth Georgia, were killed; also, Lieutenants Underwood anddivision, killed. Brig.-Gen. Branch, of North-Carolina, killed. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, f