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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second battle of Manassas--a reply to General Longstreet. (search)
al, anticipating some such emergency, and ordering the move which was then going on, at the same time offering me Major-General Anderson's division. The Commanding-General soon joined me, and a few minutes after Major-General Anderson arrived with hMajor-General Anderson arrived with his division. The attack was led by Hood's brigades, closely supported by Evans. These were rapidly reinforced by Anderson's division from the rear, Kemper's three brigades, and D. R. Jones' division from the right, and Wilcox's brigade from the lefAnderson's division from the rear, Kemper's three brigades, and D. R. Jones' division from the right, and Wilcox's brigade from the left. The brigades of Brigadier-Generals Featherston and Pryor became detached, and operated with a portion of General Jackson's command. The attacking columns moved steadily forward, driving the enemy from his different positions as rapidly as he toothrew his whole command against the Federal center and left; Hood's two brigades, followed by Evans, led the attack. R. H. Anderson's division came gallantly to the support of Hood, while the three brigades of Wilcox moved forward on his left, and t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
her three brigades were temporarily detached under General R. H. Anderson. There were six brigades so detached under AndersAnderson. His own (Anderson's) division of three brigades and the three brigades of Wilcox, Featherston and Pryor, that I commandAnderson's) division of three brigades and the three brigades of Wilcox, Featherston and Pryor, that I commanded; these were assigned to General Anderson the afternoon he marched from near Frederick City for Harper's Ferry, and subseqGeneral Anderson the afternoon he marched from near Frederick City for Harper's Ferry, and subsequently formed a portion of his division. Page 75. Crouch's division, Fourth corps, Army of the Potomac, should be Couch'ses and prisoners. True; but there were three brigades of Anderson's division of Hill's corps that were engaged, and as conse had driven the enemy out of the lines. Two brigades of Anderson's division (Perrin's and Harris') and McGowan's brigade oGowan's, Lane's and Scales' brigades of my division,. and Anderson's brigade of Field's division, attached to my command, twas the weakest, and it had 1,750; the next weakest was R. H. Anderson's, 2,168. My brigade at the time was composed of four
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
guard McLaws' flank. No brigade commander of Anderson's division, so far as I know, ever heard of tade, Wright's brigade, in part or in whole of Anderson's division, Hill's corps. The fighting ceaset and positive manner by General Longstreet. Anderson's three brigades, with no orders to cover McL he erroneously says I was ordered to do. General Anderson, he says, states in his report that a strdetails. In that report he refers to four of Anderson's brigades — Posey's being one--advancing and in with his troops in the attack. Major-General R. H. Anderson, my division commander, states it iiven it in or up the road towards Gettysburg, Anderson's right brigades would have joined in the fign of the same corps. The next day--July 1st--Anderson's division, the third and remaining division — the Texas brigade on the left, followed by Anderson's. Hood's attack began about 4 P. M. McLaws' that day: I was directed to hold my line with Anderson's division and the half of Pender's, now comm[6 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The artillery at Second Manassas-General Longstreet's reply to General S. D. Lee. (search)
mmanding position, after a rapid reconnaissance, was selected, conforming to General Longstreet's orders, between his line and General Jackson. The batteries of Miller and Squires, of the Washington artillery, were first put in position, and opened at once on the enemy, distant about twelve hundred yards. The enemy's infantry appearing in force immediately in front of these batteries, I ordered forward and crowded into position with Miller and Squires additional guns of Riley's, Bachman's, Anderson's and Chapman's batteries, all of my corps (First corps, Longstreet's), nineteen guns in all — all were at once engaged. * * * * * * The engagement with the enemy's artillery confined until 3.30 o'clock P. M., when, having silenced them and broken up the advancing line of infantry, the batteries were withdrawn to repair damage and fill the chests, which were nearly empty. The operations on the left were ended for the day. The batteries bivouacked upon the field, the men and animals sufferi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding of Stonewall Jackson — extracts from a letter of Major Benjamin Watkins Leigh. (search)
eft to watch a body of the enemy who had crossed the Rappahannock at a point opposite to Hamilton's crossing, whilst the rest of the corps marched towards Chancellorsville, where the enemy's main force had been concentrated. The greater part of Anderson's and McLaws' divisions had been driven from their positions near Chancellorsville by the advance of the enemy,. and we were marching to the support of those divisions. * * * * * * * * * Saturday the 2d I found General A. P. Hill with his staff at a point about three-fourths of a mile from Chancellorsville. General Lee, General Anderson, General Pender, and a number of general officers were here. There was some skirmishing going on in our front and several minnie balls from the enemy's skirmishers passed near us. Jackson's corps had already commenced the flank movement. * * * * * * * * * D. H. Hill's division, under Brigadier-General Rodes, had gotten out of our way, and had been followed by Trimble's division, under Briga