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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
ichmond more to east than the Aquia Creek road. The Confederates had placed Anderson at Bowling Green with twelve or fifteen thousand men for the purpose of holdin8th and 29th of May, considerable reinforcements came to join Johnston's army, Anderson's division among the rest; this officer, on seeing McDowell rushing in pursuitellan's centre from his left, the Confederate general sent, beyond the ravine, Anderson's brigade, which thus debouched upon the right of Couch's division, formed by Whilst the artillery of Whiting and Ewell was cannonading the Federal centre, Anderson, supported by the fire of two batteries, vigorously attacked the Federals, butomewhat at random. At last two of Huger's brigades emerged from the woods on Anderson's right. The third, Armistead's, which was to have commenced the attack, follHowever that may be, Hill advanced alone against the Federal positions. After Anderson's first attack he had borne toward his right, Lee having indicated the enemy's
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
ion with his whole corps and Hood's division; Anderson's strong division was to follow immediately. was formed of the four divisions under Hood, Anderson, Walker and McLaws, numbering about thirty-fing with three of his four divisions, that of Anderson having been left behind; at the time when McDn Jones, with their divisions, on his right. Anderson, who had arrived from Gainesville, supported or of McClellan; for the divisions of McLaws, Anderson and A. P. Hill—that is to say, more than one on the 17th. Indeed, McLaws, A. P. Hill and Anderson were yet at some distance from Sharpsburg, ondivision from Longstreet's corps, and sent R. H. Anderson to oppose French and Richardson, whose promost from four to five thousand men. While Anderson was uniting with the tired troops of Hill to field extending as far as the Piper house. R. H. Anderson sought to repair this reverse by attackingdriven in disorder beyond the Piper house. R. H. Anderson had failed to break French's lines and was[1 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
Polk, comprised the divisions of Cheatham and Withers, the left, under Hardee, the divisions of Anderson and Buckner. These divisions were much stronger than those of the Federals; they were composedolk. The two divisions of Hardee's corps were separated from the Federals by Chaplin's Creek. Anderson was opposed to Rousseau and Sheridan; Buckner on his right faced Jackson. Cheatham found himself at first on the left of Anderson; but by a fortunate chance he was withdrawn from this position, and, after a fruitless march toward the extreme right, was placed in reserve behind the other two dittle-field, from which he kept away, as will be presently seen. Toward two o'clock Buckner and Anderson put themselves in motion. The latter, with the brigades of Jones and Brown, attacked Rousseau'leys of musketry with no effect. Polk caused Smith's brigade of Cheatham's division to support Anderson, the other two brigades of that division being already engaged at the extreme right. All the e
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
ll was not within reach to succor it. In the early part of October Anderson's brigade had already made some demonstration in that direction foemained at Nashville with his brigade and that of Negley, attacked Anderson on the 7th of October at Lavergne, and compelled him to retire. Soyed in the following order from left to right: Loomis, Manigault, Anderson and Chalmers along the railroad; five hundred metres behind the laan, Withers, on his right, had directed one of his brigades, under Anderson, against Negley's Federal division, in conformity with Bragg's intwo woods and almost muzzle to muzzle. It was nine o'clock when Anderson commenced the attack; about half an hour later, Sheridan, being meecuting the order issued by Bragg. Whilst Stewart, having rallied Anderson's scattered troops, was renewing the assault against Negley, Chalmvery time they attempted to pass beyond the Cowan house. But when Anderson's and Stewart's Confederates had driven in the Federal line on Haz
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
ied by Longstreet's corps; Hood, from the elevation on the right, communicated with A. P. Hill at Yerby; Pickett and Ransom occupied the middle range; McLaws and Anderson were encamped in the rear of Marye's Hill and Cemetery Hill, ready to occupy the redoubts planted on the heights with all their artillery; the first named had a t Barksdale's sharpshooters, who had not been dislodged, again interrupted the construction of the bridge. On the heights beyond Fredericksburg the divisions of Anderson and McLaws could be seen drawn up in line of battle; their artillery, ready for action, reserved its fire until the enemy's infantry should be compelled to deplobetween the second stream and the Telegraph Road. Ransom, who was posted on the Plank Road, considerably in the rear, advanced in order to reinforce McLaws' and Anderson's line, and sent Cooke's brigade to occupy the left of the stone wall, along the Telegraph Road between those two divisions. Taliaferro's division of Jackson's
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
ton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 or 5 brigades, under McLaws, Kershaw, Semmes and R. H. Anderson. On the 30th of May the army under Johnston at Richmond, about 70,000 strong, was divided into six divisions: 1st, Magruder; 6 brigades. 2d, Smith; 7, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 brigades, under McLaws, Kershaw, Semmes and R. H. Anderson. 5th, A. P. Hill; 2 or 3 brigades, under G. B. Anderson and Branch. 6th, Huger; 3 brigades, under Pryor, Mahone and Pickett. Holmes' division, compriirginia On the 26th of June, 1862. Commander-in-chief, R. E. Lee. 1st corps, Longstreet. 1st Division, Longstreet. 1st Brigade, Kemper; 2d Brigade, R. H. Anderson; 3d Brigade, Pickett; 4th Brigade, Wilcox; 5th Brigade, Pryor. 2d Division, A. P. Hill. 1st Brigade, J. R. Anderson; 2d Brigade, M. Gregg; 3d Brigade, Arch
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
..... 3d corps, Stoneman. Division, Sickles. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; brigade, ...... Division, Birney. Ward's brigade, Berry's brigade; brigade, ..... Division, Whipple. Carroll's brigade; brigade,......; brigade, ...... Cavalry, Pleasonton's Division. Brigade,...; brigade, .... Bayard's Division. Brigade, ......; brigade, ..... Reserve Artillery, Hunt. Confederate army. Commander-in-chief, General R. E. Lee. 1st corps, Longstreet. 1st Division, R. H. Anderson. Wright's brigade, Armistead's brigade, Wilcox's brigade, Perry's brigade, Featherstone's brigade, Mahone's brigade. 2d Division, Pickett. Kemper's brigade, Jenkins' brigade, Walker's brigade. 3d Division, Ransom. Brigade, ...... (formerly Ransom's); Cook's brigade. 4th Division, Hood. Law's brigade, Toombs' brigade, G. T. Anderson's brigade, Robertson's brigade, Evans' brigade. 5th Division, McLaws. Howell Cobb's brigade, Barksdale's brigade, Kershaw's brigade, Semmes'