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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 23 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 8 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Richard Anderson or search for Richard Anderson in all documents.

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lexander H. Stephens vice-president. Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. George Davis, Attorney-General. After the great mass meeting in Union square, New York, April 20, 1861 Knots of citizens still linger around the stands where Anderson, who had abandoned Sumter only six days before, had just roused the multitude to wild enthusiasm. Of this gathering in support of the Government the New York Herald said at the time: Such a mighty uprising of the people has never before been wieans to preserve the Union intact and inviolate. Great unanimity prevailed throughout the whole proceedings; party politics were ignored, and the entire meeting—speakers and listeners—were a unit in maintaining the national honor unsullied. Major Anderson, the hero of Fort Sumter, was present, and showed himself at the various stands, at each of which he was most enthusiastically received. An impressive feature of the occasion was the flag of Sumter, hoisted on the stump of the staff that had
y after Second Bull Run he was relieved from field service, and was president of several army boards. In July, 1864, he was placed at the head of the Department of the Pacific, and after the war held various commands. He was retired in 1882, and died in San Francisco, May 4, 1885. Major-General Abner Doubleday (U. S. M. A. 1842) was born at Ballston Spa, New York, June 26, 1819, and served in the Mexican and Seminole wars. As captain of the artillery he was at Fort Sumter under Major Anderson, and fired upon the Confederates the first Federal gun of the Civil War. He served under Major-General Patterson in the Valley, and on February 3, 1862, was made brigadier-general of volunteers and placed in charge of the defenses of Washington. He had a brigade in the Third Corps, Army of Virginia, and afterward a division, which he retained when the corps again became the First Federal major-generals commanders of the tenth army corps J. M. Brannan commanded the Tenth
he war, although other generals, for various reasons, commanded the corps from time to time. A new corps of North Carolina and Virginia troops under Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson was added at the end of 1864. Longstreet's corps, with the exception of Pickett's division, was with the Army of Tennessee, and in eastern Tennesseestreet's Corps, fought in the Army of Tennessee at Chickamauga and remained in East Tennessee until April, 1864, when it rejoined the Army of Virginia. Major-General R. H. Anderson succeeded to the command of the corps after Longstreet was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, day 6th. The latter returned to his corps, October It made a striking record in the Seven Days battles, where it sustained a loss of 1055, or 57 per cent. of its entire number. Later this brigade was in General R. H. Anderson's division, to the command of which General Wilcox succeeded. He also participated at the battle of Gettysburg and served through a number of campaigns i
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
10, 1862. Lee, Stephen D., June 23, 1864. Longstreet, James, Oct. 9, 1862. Pemberton, J. C., Oct. 10, 1862. Polk, Leonidas, Oct. 10, 1862. Taylor, Richard, April 8, 1864. Lieutenant-generals, provisional army (with temporary rank) Anderson, R. H., May 31, 1864. Early, Jubal A., May 31, 1864. Stewart, A. P., June 23, 1864. Major-generals, provisional army Anderson, J. P., Feb. 17, 1864. Bate, William B., Feb. 23, 1864. Bowen, John S., May 25, 1863. Breckinridge, J. C., Apr. H., Nov. 1, 1864. Posey, Carnot, Nov. 1, 1862. Preston, John S., June 10, 1864. Reynolds, D. H., Mar. 5, 1864. Stevens, W. H., Aug. 28, 1864. Terry, William, May 19, 1864. Brigadier-generals, provisional army (with temporary rank) Anderson, R. H., July 26, 1864. Barry, John D., Aug. 3, 1864. Brantly, Wm. F., July 26, 1864. Browne, Wm. M., Nov. 11, 1864. Bullock, Robert, Nov. 29, 1864. Carter, John C., July 7, 1864. Cox, William R., May 31, 1864. Dubose, D. M., Nov. 16, 1864.