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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 189 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 109 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 72 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 62 10 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 23 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Richard H. Anderson or search for Richard H. Anderson in all documents.

Your search returned 36 results in 21 document sections:

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The water-battery at Fort Jackson. (search)
and not one of them had been started from its moorings. As soon as I caught sight of the moving objects, I knew they were the enemy's vessels, and I ordered the guns to be trained upon the two which were in the lead, and to open a rapid fire upon them. Only a moment sufficed for the gunners to sight the guns, so thoroughly was everything prepared, and the water-battery thundered its greeting to the enemy. Fort Jackson followed instantly with a grand crash of artillery from the guns under Anderson and Ogden, Baylor and Agar along the lower and river fronts, and from those of Mumford in the mortar bastion and Kennedy in the flag-staff bastion. Fort St. Philip echoed with the boom of its guns. The Federal vessels replied with broadsides. The flashes of the guns, from both sides, lit up the river with a lurid light that revealed the outlines of the Federal steamers more distinctly. I do not believe there ever was a grander spectacle witnessed before in the world than that displaye
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
468 killed, 1442 wounded, and 373 captured or missing == 2283. The Confederate forces. General Joseph E. Johnston. Major-General James Longstreet in immediate command on the field. Second division (Longstreet's). First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose P. Hill: 1st Va., Col. Louis B. Williams (w), Maj. William H. Palmer (w); 7th Va., Col. James L. Kemper; 11th Va., Col. Samuel Garland (w); 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Brigade loss: k, 67; w, 245; m, 14 == 326. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (in command on the right), Col. Micah Jenkins: 4th S. C. (Battalion), Maj. C. S. Mattison; 5th S. C.. Col. John R. R. Giles; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Micah Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Walker; La. Foot Rifles, Capt. McG. Goodwyn; Fauquier (Va.) Artillery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling; Williamsburg (Va.) Artillery, (2 guns), Capt. William R. Garrett; Richmond (Va.), Howitzers (2 guns), Capt. Edward S. McCarthy. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 75; m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
rd on our left through an open field, under a destructive fire, the admirable service of Carter's and Bondurant's batteries, and a skillfully combined attack upon the Federal left, under General Hill's direction, by Rodes's brigade in front and that of Rains in flank, were at last successful, and the enemy abandoned their intrenchments. Just then reenforcements from Couch's division came up, and an effort was made to recover the position. Bu t it was to no purpose; for two regiments of R. H. Anderson's brigade reinforced Hill's troops, and the Federals were driven back to Seven Pines. Keyes's corps (Casey's and Couch's divisions) was united at Seven Pines and reinforced by Kearny's division, coming from Savage's Station. But the three divisions were so vigorously attacked by Hill that they were broken and driven from their intrenchments, the greater part along the Williamsburg road to the intrenched line west of Savage's Station. Two brigades of their left, however, fled to White
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
3594 wounded, and 647 captured or missing = 5031. The Confederate Army. General Joseph E. Johnston (w); Major-General Gustavus W. Smith; General Robert E. Lee. right wing, Major-General James Longstreet. Longstreet's division, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (temporarily). Kemper's Brigade, Col. James L. Kemper: 1st Va.; 7th Va.; 11th Va.; 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Anderson's (R. H.) Brigade, Col. Micah Jenkins: 5th S. C., Col. J. R. R. Giles (k), Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., CAnderson's (R. H.) Brigade, Col. Micah Jenkins: 5th S. C., Col. J. R. R. Giles (k), Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton (w and c), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Steedman; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Maj. William Anderson; Va. Battery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling. Pickett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. N. Berkeley; 18th Va., Col. R. E. Withers; 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. William Watts; Va. Battery, Capt. James Dearing. Brigade loss: k and w, 350. Wilcox's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox: 9th Ala., Lieut.-Col. Stephen F. Hale; 10th Ala., Maj. J. J. Wo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
rm-houses as seen from Casey's redoubt. From a photograph. Hill then sent to Longstreet for another brigade. In a few minutes the magnificent brigade of R. H. Anderson came to Hill's support. The latter says: A portion of this force, under Colonel Jenkins, consisting of the Palmetto Sharp-shooters and the 6th South Caro the two South Carolina regiments to join the 27th Georgia and scour along the railroad and Nine-mile road, and thus get in rear of the enemy, he directed General R. H. Anderson, with the other portion of his brigade, to attack the Federals in a wood north, and within cannon-range of the redoubt. This wood was then occupied by ision On the Confederate side the losses, May 31st, in D. H. Hill's division were 2915, being more than one-third of his effective strength. The losses in R. H. Anderson's brigade (of Longstreet's division) are not reported; but it is known that the 6th South Carolina Regiment lost 269 out of 521 in action. The losses in this
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
ty.), Capt. J. P. W. Read; Va. Battery (James City Arty.), Capt. L. W. Richardson; Va. Battery (Magruder Arty.), Capt. T. Jeff. Page, Jr. Longstreet's division, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet (also in command of A. P. Hill's division), Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James L. Kemper: ist Va., Capt. G. F. Norton; 7th Va., Col. W. T. Patton; 11th Va., Capt. K. Otey; 17th Va., Col. M. I). Corse; 24th Va., Lieut.-Col. Peter Hairston; Va. Battery (Loudoun Arty.), Capt. Arthur L. Rogers. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 205; nm, 165 == 414. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson, Col. Micah Jenkins: 2d S. C. (Rifles), Col. J. V. Moore; 4th S. C. (Battalion), Maj. C. S. Mattison; 5th S. C., Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Micah Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Walker. Brigade loss: k, 136; w, 638; mn, 13== 787. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett (w), Col. John B. Strange, Col. Eppa Hunton, Col. John B
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
per relation to Ewell's right, and thus helped A. P. Hill's beaten division, attacked the enemy's center or left center, and about 6 P. M. drove it in. But Lawton, bearing too much by his own left, unwittingly crossed Hood's line of march and reenforced Ewell — a most timely providence, for Ewell's line was about done for. The 2d Virginia brigade seems to have borne as much too far to the right, and at last, near sunset, found themselves behind Longstreet's extreme right,--the brigade of R. H. Anderson, whom they assisted in driving the enemy. The 3d Virginia brigade brought up behind Longstreet's left, passing near Gaines's Mill, and near sunset participated in the victory. The Stonewall brigade, under Winder, bore too much to the left and entered the fight on your right. Pickett's brigade, headed by the Old Ironsides (18th Virginia), broke Porter's line just west of the Watts house. With regard to this break, General Law, in a letter to the Editors, says: Whiting's division cover
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.47 (search)
limbed out on the other side, and over the lines of breastworks, reaching the crest of the hill beyond with such rapidity as to capture all of the Federal artillery (fourteen pieces) at that point. We had now reached the high plateau in rear of the center of General Porter's position, his line having been completely cut in two, and thus rendered no longer tenable. From the flanks of the great gap where Whiting's division had torn through, the Federal lines gave way in both directions. R. H. Anderson's brigade, till then in reserve, passed through on the right, and led the way for Longstreet's division, while on the left the roll of musketry receded toward the Chickahominy, and the cheering of the victorious Confederates announced that Jackson, Ewell, and D. H. Hill were sweeping that part of the field. The battle was won; the Federal infantry was in full flight toward the swamps of the Chickahominy and the bridges in their rear, leaving a large portion of their artillery in the h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
ven the credit to General Misunderstanding, who, in history, fights most battles. Parts of Hazzard's, Pettit's, and Osborn's batterries were engaged on the Union side. The Confederate infantry north of the railroad (Cobb's, Toombs's, and Anderson's brigades) did not take an active part in the battle. Anderson's brigade is not shown, its position being outside the northern bounds of the map. The Confederate artillery engaged comprised Kemper's battery, two guns of Hart's battery, and Anderson's brigade is not shown, its position being outside the northern bounds of the map. The Confederate artillery engaged comprised Kemper's battery, two guns of Hart's battery, and Lieutenant Barry's 32-pounder rifled gun mounted on a rail-car, and protected from cannon-shot by a sloping roof, in front, covered with plates of iron, through which a port-hole had been pierced. Editors. was over, our troops held the contested ground. Their behavior throughout the fight had been admirable. General E. M. Law says in the Southern bivouac for May, 1887: The battle of Savage's Station, although a drawn fight as far as the possession of the field was concerned, was practical
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
ined to make the heaviest attack I could. The position in front of me was very strong. An open field led down to a difficult ravine a short distance beyond the Powhite Creek. From there the ground made a steep ascent, and was covered with trees and slashed timber and hastily made rifle-trenches. General Whiting came to me with two brigades of Jackson's men and asked me to put him in. I told him I was just organizing an attack and would give him position. My column of attack then was R. H. Anderson's and Pickett's brigades, with Law's and Hood's of Whiting's division. We attacked and defeated the Federals on their left, capturing many thousand stand of arms, fifty-two pieces of artillery, a large quantity of supplies, and many prisoners,--among them General Reynolds, who afterward fell at Gettysburg. The Federals made some effort to reenforce and recover their lost ground, but failed, and during the afternoon and night withdrew their entire forces from that side of the Chickahomi
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