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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 4 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 14 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert H. Anderson or search for Robert H. Anderson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Ocean Pond, Florida. (search)
son into three brigades, commanded respectively by Brigadier Generals Finnegan and Colquitt, and Colonel George P. Harrison, three meritorious officers; the last two of whom have won promotion by their active participation in the combat of the 20th ultimo, at which it is proper to say, Brigadier-General Colquitt commanded on the immediate field of battle. He has seen much service likewise in the army of Northern Virginia. The cavalry has also been organized into a brigade under Colonel Robert H. Anderson; the four light batteries, of four pieces each, were placed under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C. C. Jones, and two batteries of siege guns (six pieces), present on the field, under Major J. L. Buist. It is hoped this arrangement will enhance the efficiency of the troops, who are in fine spirits and good condition. Too much praise cannot be awarded to the brave officers and men who encountered and defeated twice their numbers at Ocean Pond, and I commend them to the notice of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of battery Gregg-General Lane's reply to General Harris. (search)
ent commands were so mixed up he could not execute my order without calling my men from the banquette, which would endanger too many valuable lives. While inside of the palisade Captain Hale saw several men wounded by splinters from the palisade, and two of the gallant artillerists shot down in quick succession while attempting to fire one of the two pieces. Before I left, I saw the artillery withdrawn from the fort in rear of and above Fort Gregg, called by some, Whitworth, and others, Anderson. It was this that caused me to state in my letter to General Wilcox, that Harris's brigade abandoned that fort before Fort Gregg was attacked in force. After putting Lieutenant Snow in command of that part of my brigade which was in Fort Gregg, Captain Hale and Lieutenant Meade, of my staff, Lieutenant Thomas M. Wiggins, of the Thirty-seventh North Carolina, and I, started for the Dam at a dignified quick-step, but the enemy's infantry fire soon made us double-quick, and then forced us
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
informs me it had been previously ordered. I then reported to General Wilcox in person, told him of the result of our fight, informed him where my brigade was, and was ordered by him to let it remain in its position, as it would be relieved by Anderson before daylight. It gives me great pleasure to be able to bear testimony to the gallant bearing of my command in this engagement, and to the cool and unflinching bravery with which both officers and men advanced against a largely superior for by General Wilcox, in rear of Scales, with a part of Heth's division in our rear — there were also other troops to the left of the road. Next morning about day it was ascertained that the enemy was advancing, and as we had not been relieved by Anderson's division and no further orders had been received from any one, I endeavored to form my brigade in line of battle perpendicular to the road. Just as I had succeeded in forming the Thirty-third, Eighteenth and Thirty-seventh with one-half of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
a Confederate battery a few hundred yards up the river, in position on the right bank. At times the fire of three Union batteries was concentrated upon it, at a distance, I should judge, of not more than six hundred yards, but it, nevertheless, held its ground, being well protected by earthworks. There must have been several hundred rounds of ammunition expended upon it. It was in a portion of the Confederate line then held by Longstreet's corps, at that time commanded by the late General R. H. Anderson. The object of this communication, Mr. Editor, is to ask its insertion in your valuable Historical Magazine, in the hope that it will meet the eye of some one who can tell me the name of the battery, the kind and numbers of guns (I think there were but two), the nature of the position, the casualties, and any other facts that may be of interest, which I should like to incorporate in the history of my company soon to be published. Hoping to hear something authentic touching this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The concentration before Shiloh-reply to General Ruggles. (search)
his front, from the Monterey road, where General Bragg said he would be, or Ruggles who was out of place? We see from Anderson's report [page 271, Official Reports Battles C. S, A., Vol. I] that on the night of the 4th, General Bragg in his tent will be thrown upon this subject if the General will tell us plainly what he was doing from that hour till 3 P. M., when Anderson gives us to understand the division took up its march for the line of battle; or, if he chooses, 12 1/2 P. M., when Munfs two brigades in all that time--five-and-a-half hours by one statement, eight by the other. If he does, I refer him to Anderson's report, and to the very paragraph in it, which he quotes on page 59. This, with an extract from Mumford, he uses to prove that the troops in his front were Clark's. Anderson says, when he took his place in column, at 3 P. M., marching in the direction of Shiloh, he found the road blocked with brigades, wagons and artillery, almost up to the point where his line was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
with all these calamities at once, and reduced to the extremities of want, never did he despair, or do or say anything unworthy of a king. * * * At last, at the close of life, when a grievous distemper was added to the troubles of old age, he retained so much self-possession that he arranged the present state of the kingdom, and provided for the tranquility of his posterity. With justice was his death lamented by his people, not only as that of an upright king, but of a loving father. With a few slight alterations, this passage written over 300 years ago of Robert Bruce, would seem to have been written only ten years ago of Robert Lee, the greatest soldier and the highest type of the chivalric gentleman of the age in which he lived. Authorities: Douglas' Baronage and Peerage of Scotland. Buchanan's History of Scotland. Chalmer's Caledonia. Anderson's Royal Genealogies. Hume's and Knight's Histories of England. Strickland's Queens of England. Campbell's History of Virginia.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
nth N. C. Regiment 1219 222224 Grand Total110574 10694100 Oficers killed. Twenty-eighth regiment--Lieutenant H. I. Costner, Company B. Officers wounded. Twenty-eighth regiment--Lieutenant R. D. Rhyne, Company B. Thirty-third regiment--Captain J. A. Weston, Company F; Lieutenant J. W. Gibbs, Company F. Thirty-seventh regiment--Lieutenant I. B. Somerville, Company B; Lieutenant I. M. Grimsley, Company K. Action at Storr's farm on Tottapottamoi Creek. On the 27th we left Anderson's and bivouaced that night near Ashland. Next morning we resumed our march at 3 o'clock and camped that afternoon near Shady Grove church, where we remained until the afternoon of the 29th, when we were ordered back a short distance and bivouaced for the night near Atlee's. Next morning we formed line of battle on the right of McGowan and intrenched near the railroad. On the 31st we were ordered to Storr's (or Stowe's) farm, on the Tottapottamoi creek, near Pole Green church, where we rel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Action at Storr's farm on Tottapottamoi Creek. (search)
Action at Storr's farm on Tottapottamoi Creek. On the 27th we left Anderson's and bivouaced that night near Ashland. Next morning we resumed our march at 3 o'clock and camped that afternoon near Shady Grove church, where we remained until the afternoon of the 29th, when we were ordered back a short distance and bivouaced for the night near Atlee's. Next morning we formed line of battle on the right of McGowan and intrenched near the railroad. On the 31st we were ordered to Storr's (or Stowe's) farm, on the Tottapottamoi creek, near Pole Green church, where we relieved Wofford's brigade. We were here engaged in very heavy skirmishing all that day, besides being subjected to a terrible artillery fire, losing about twenty killed and wounded. On the 1st of June we moved back and built a new line of works, the old one being held by a strong line of skirmishers.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of Fort Sumter. (search)
61, that a company (the Moultrie Guard) of the first regiment of rifles, was sent to garrison Fort Johnson, or rather to occupy the summer houses of James' Island, fronting on Charleston harbor. A small earthwork held by a detachment of the German artillery stood near the wharf, and a mortar battery on the beach opposite Sumter at the time was being put in readiness for the fight. The defiant attitude of the Federal Government had rendered it necessary to have little communication with Major Anderson's garrison. To this end an order had been issued, permitting a boat from Sumter to come in a direct line to the wharf at Fort Johnson, take on such supplies of vegetables, fresh meats and mail, which arrived daily by steamer from Charleston, (and which considerate clemency kept the enemy in health and comfortable condition, pending the last unsuccessful negotiations for a peaceful settlement) the boat then to return in a direct course to the fort. This system of daily trips to and from
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the Deer Creek expedition of 1863. (search)
mond, Va.: Dear Sir — With the hope that some one will write a full account of the Deer Creek Expedition of 1863, I mention one incident which is certainly worthy of record. In January, 1863, Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel W. Ferguson was ordered to proceed to the sunflower country, above Vicksburg, Miss., with a small force, consisting of a six-gun battery and a company of cavalry. The battery was composed as follows: two guns from Captain Bledsoe's Missouri artillery, commanded by Lieutenant Anderson; two guns from a Louisiana battery, commanded by Lieutenant Cottonham; one gun from the Third battery of Maryland artillery, commanded by Sergeant Daniel Toomey; one gun from Captian Corput's Georgia battery, commanded by Sergeant Mitchell Johnston, which two latter pieces were commanded by Lieutenant T. J. Bates, of Waddell's Alabama artillery. These six pieces were commanded by Lieutenant R. L. Wood, of Bledsoe's Missouri artillery. The company of cavalry belonged to Mississippi.
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