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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 42 2 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
call for troops to defend the national capitol, although not unexpected by Governor Andrew and his military staff, were nevertheless a very great surprise to the peont for troops, that gentleman positively refused, in a letter addressed to Governor Andrew, to accept from Massachusetts more than six regiments of three-years volune number by discharge. It was not until the 17th of June succeeding, that Governor Andrew, with all his knowledge and ability, could prevail upon the Secretary to amed a serious aspect, when it was crushed and scattered by the firmness of Governor Andrew and the military and civil authorities of the cities and State. The only s issued by the AdjutantGen-eral of the Commonwealth, with the approval of Governor Andrew, requesting the Mayor of each city, and the Selectmen of each town, to maky bitter and defiant enemies. In all they did, they acted in harmony with Governor Andrew and the State authorities, and were nobly sustained by their several const
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
59. Population in 1860, 1,782; in 1865, 1,649. Valuation in 1860, $616,976; in 1865, $616,727. The selectmen in 1861 were Harry Rhodes, Martin E. Sheldon, James Andrew; in 1862, Martin E. Sheldon, J. Andrew, Grove Gaylord; in 1863, J. Andrew, Aaron Smith, Warren Walker; in 1864, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, Henry Sisson; J. Andrew, Grove Gaylord; in 1863, J. Andrew, Aaron Smith, Warren Walker; in 1864, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, Henry Sisson; in 1865, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, William C. Kasson. The town-clerk in 1861 was Salmon K. Norton; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Seth Pease. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Dyer Stanard; in 1863, Theron Warner; in 1864 and 1865, Benjamin Wheeler, Jr. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relJ. Andrew, Aaron Smith, Warren Walker; in 1864, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, Henry Sisson; in 1865, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, William C. Kasson. The town-clerk in 1861 was Salmon K. Norton; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Seth Pease. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Dyer Stanard; in 1863, Theron Warner; in 1864 and 1865, Benjamin Wheeler, Jr. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 2d of December, with special reference to the act of the extra session of the Legislature respecting the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers; at which, after proper consideration, it was voted that the selectmen be instructed to provide every volunteer's family, belonging to the town,
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
9th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropriated to pay said bounties. October 21st, A further appropriation of five thousand dollars was made for the Home and Coast Guard, and twenty thousand for military bounties, which on the 13th of December was increased by a loan of twenty-six thousand dollars. 1863. February 26th, The city council adjourned for the purpose of paying their respects to Governor Andrew and General Wool at the city hall. March 4th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of colored citizens who shall be mustered into the service of the United States. April 9th, Five hundred dollars were authorized to be expended on the enlistment of a company of heavy artillery, which on the 21st of May was increased to one thousand dollars. July 15th, A watchman was discharged for using seditious language. July 30th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of dr
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
essels. It was soon made stronger than ever, and was garrisoned until the end of the war. August 15th, The committee reported they had addressed a letter to Governor Andrew to show that the Federal Government only allowed laborers at work on fortifications one dollar and twenty-five cents a day, and they could not be obtained nowrly as well as Marblehead, and therefore Marblehead should not expend all the money and run all the risk. The authorities of Marblehead had an interview with Governor Andrew; and the matter was finally arranged, so far as it could be at that time, that if the town would by its local action appropriate a sufficient sum to pay fiftywler, aldermen. The city-clerk during all the years of the war was Eleazer Johnson. The city-treasurer during the same period was Daniel Granger. 1861. Governor Andrew, the day after his first inauguration as governor (January 5th), ordered national salutes to be fired at different places, on January 8th, in commemoration of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
paid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $41.92; in 1862, $573.57; in 1863, $768.60; in 1864, $638.88; in 1865, $155.45. Total amount, $2,178.42. Granby Incorporated June 11, 1768. Population in 1860, 907; in 1865, 908. Valuation in 1860, $476,382; in 1865, $470,125. The selectmen in 1861 were Andrew White, Park Warner, Phineas D. Barton; in 1862, Andrew White, William W. Ferry, Simeon C. Stebbins; in 1863, Simeon C. Stebbins, Francis E. Taylor, James M. Barton; in 1864, Andrew White, C. C. Aldrich, Charles F. Clark; in 1865, Andrew White, James M. Barton, Frederick Taylor. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Philo Chapin. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year in regard to the war. 1862. July 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the town; and on the 22d of August
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
which is laid upon our nation. On the same day an order passed the Council to cease recruiting, the same being in accordance with orders received through Governor Andrew from the Secretary of War. Charlestown furnished four thousand three hundred and seven men for the war, which was a surplus of one hundred and eleven over he monument erected to the memory of Ladd and Whitney was to have taken place on the 19th, the fourth anniversary of their heroic death; but at the request of Governor Andrew, who was to deliver the address, it was postponed on account of the death of the President until the 17th of June, the anniversary of the battle of Bunker Hipped, the stores closed, and business of every kind was at a stand. The day was very warm, the procession very full, and the route very long. The address of Governor Andrew was of great merit. Lowell furnished five thousand two hundred and sixtysix men for the war, which was a surplus of two hundred and eighteen over and above
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
kline who have already gone into service. A number of gentlemen addressed the meeting; the roll-list was eagerly signed, and the selectmen were requested to prepare a suitable drill ground. The meeting broke up with three hearty cheers for Governor Andrew, who had by his prompt action placed Massachusetts where she always wished to be, in the foremost rank. The military committee was composed of the following gentlemen: Moses B. Williams, James A. Dupee, Marshall Stearns, William K. Melcher, do not enroll themselves in the volunteer company aforesaid, be expected to form a Home Brigade under such officers as they may choose, as a reserve force, and, if such should be necessary, for the public defence. Resolved, That his Excellency Governor Andrew, for the sagacity that foresaw the present crisis, and the prudence and energy with which he has provided for it, in calling the troops of Massachusetts to take the field in advance of all others, is entitled to the confidence and grati
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
e hoisted upon the staff over Faneuil Hall every day except Sunday until otherwise ordered. On the same day a communication was received by the mayor from Governor Andrew informing him that he expected from twelve to fifteen hundred Massachusetts troops in the city, who might remain for a day or two previous to leaving the Statbut advised that three companies of cavalry be recruited to form with the California Company a Cavalry Battalion, to recruit which authority had been given by Governor Andrew to Hon. Amos A. Lawrence. The suggestions of the mayor were adopted, and thirty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay bounties, and the city committee wamith, Walter B. Andrews, and Allen A. Kingsbury. The funeral ceremonies took place on the 7th of May. The services in the church were attended by His Excellency Governor Andrew, and his military staff, and a vast concourse of the citizens of Chelsea. The funeral procession was very long, business being almost wholly suspended.