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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 16 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 6 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, The War Governor. (search)
he small town of Windham. At the time when Hawthorne was sailing his little boat on the lake, at the age of fourteen, John Andrew was in his nurse's arms,--born May 31, 1818. Like Hawthorne and Longfellow he went to Bowdoin College, but did not diencement. We are still in ignorance concerning his college life, what his interests were, and how he spent his time; but Andrew never cared much for anything which had not an immediate and practical value. Greek and Latin, merely for their own sakeady formed decided opinions on the slavery question. The practitioner with whom he studied was precisely the opposite of Andrew,--a brilliant scholar, but formal and unsympathetic. Although a young man of fine promise he was soon excelled by his less learned but more energetic pupil. At the age of twenty-six we find Andrew presiding at a convention of Free-soilers, the same which nominated Dr. S. G. Howe for Congress. Why he did not appear in politics between 1844 and 1859 is something of a
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Introduction. (search)
she had great opportunities. There was no mere alms-giving; but sin and sorrow must be brought home to the fireside and the heart; the fugitive slave, the drunkard, the outcast woman, must be the chosen guests of the abode,must be taken, and held, and loved into reformation or hope. It would be a very imperfect representation of Maria Child which regarded her only from a literary point of view. She was wise in counsel; and men like Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson, Salmon P. Chase, and Governor Andrew availed themselves of her foresight and sound judgment of men and measures. Her pen was busy with correspondence, and whenever a true man or a good cause needed encouragement, she was prompt to give it. Her donations for benevolent causes and beneficent reforms were constant and liberal; and only those who knew her intimately could understand the cheerful and unintermitted self-denial which alone enabled her to make them. She did her work as far as possible out of sight, without nois
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
the storm lulled a little. They cried, Throw him out! Throw a brick-bat at him! Your house is a-fire; don't you know your house is a-fire? go put out your house! Then they'd sing, with various bellowing and shrieking accompaniments, Tell John Andrew, tell John Andrew, John Brown's dead. I should think there were four or five hundred of them. At one time they all rose up, many of them clattered down-stairs, and there was a surging forward towards the platform. My heart beat so fast I coJohn Andrew, John Brown's dead. I should think there were four or five hundred of them. At one time they all rose up, many of them clattered down-stairs, and there was a surging forward towards the platform. My heart beat so fast I could hear it; for I did not then know how Mr. Phillips's armed friends were stationed at every door and in the middle of every aisle. They formed a firm wall which the mob could not pass. At last it was announced that the police were coming. I saw and heard nothing of them, but there was a lull. Mr. Phillips tried to speak, but his voice was again drowned. Then by a clever stroke of management he stooped forward and addressed his speech to the reporters stationed directly below him. This t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 6 (search)
emed every moment to be on the point of becoming a star, but never did. He enlisted as a private soldier and died in hospital, where he had been detailed as nurse. The other had been educated at West Point, and had served in the Florida Indian wars; he was strikingly handsome and mercilessly opinionated; he commanded the first regiment of heavy artillery raised in Massachusetts, did much for the defense of Washington in the early days of the Civil War, and resigned his commission when Governor Andrew refused to see justice done — as he thought-to one of his subordinates. His name was William Batcheldor Greene. But all these companionships were wholly secondary to one which was for me most memorable, and brought joy for a few years and sorrow for many. Going through the doors of Divinity Hall I met one day a young man so handsome in his dark beauty that he seemed like a picturesque Oriental; slender, keen-eyed, raven-haired, he arrested the eye and the heart like some fascinati
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 10 (search)
singers were out of breath. The favorite burden was,-- Tell John Andrew, Tell John Andrew, Tell John Andrew John Brown's dead; with moreJohn Andrew, Tell John Andrew John Brown's dead; with more ribald verses following. It was not many months before those who took part in the meeting and those who tried to suppress it were marching John Andrew John Brown's dead; with more ribald verses following. It was not many months before those who took part in the meeting and those who tried to suppress it were marching southward in uniform, elbow to elbow, singing a very different John Brown song. There was one moment during this session when it seemed asng men in Worcester, who gave me a letter of recommendation to Governor Andrew, that I might ask him to appropriate a sum from his contingent fire of alarm and draw any rebel force away from Washington. Governor Andrew approved the project, but had no contingent fund; Dr. S. G. Hoon of the government became clearer, I obtained authority from Governor Andrew to raise a regiment, and had about half the necessary ten compand the whole affair proved abortive. It was understood with Governor Andrew that while I was to raise the regiment, I was to be only secon
ers and privates also, during these troublous times, have been preserved. Joseph Hastings was wounded and lost an eye in 1690. In the same year, among those who were engaged in the unfortunate expedition against Canada are found the names of John Andrew, William Blanchard, Nathaniel Bowman, Matthew Bridge, Daniel Champney, James Cutler, Edward Green, Stephen Hastings, Joseph Hicks, John Manning, John Peirce, Joseph Smith, Nathaniel Sparhawk, John Squire, Thomas Stacy, John Stedman. In 1707, 44 to 1748. A paper is on file in the office of the City Clerk, endorsed, Men enlisted in Cambridge against Canada, 1745 and 1746, containing the following names: Capt. [William] Phips, Lieut. [Spencer] Phips, Lieut. Moore, Sergeant Gee, Sam uel Andrew, William Barrett, Jr., John Batherick, W. Brown, Nathaniel Chad ick, Downing Champney, Solomon Champney, John Clark, Abraham Colfrey, Benjamin Crackbone, Robert Crowell, Cutter's Man,——Fillebrown, Simon Goddinz, Nathaniel Hancock, Andrew Hill, An
minary campaign has begun. Its expects noon to hear of decisive battle and "nothing but stupidity," it adds, "can prevent Jeff Davis from being a prisoner in three months, and the relation subdued." Burnside left Washington on the 20th for Fortress Monroe, to take his new command. Persons quitting Yankee Doodledum for Europe have to give bonds to go in service if drafted, or furnish substitutes. Seward went to the theatre for the last time, on the 19th, in Washington. John Andrew is organizing a negro regiment in Massachusetts. Recruits for it from Pennsylvania passed through New York on the 20th. Gold closed in New York on the 20th at 151½ exchange 171 The Herald has the following "astounding" paragraph: Important news reaches us from San Francisco to the effect that the schooner Chapman, when leaving for Mexico on the 15th, was boarded by the government officials, and taken in charge as a privateer. About twenty Secessionists were captured aboar