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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
the frolics of the young. Among the plays given at Green Peace were the Three bears, the Doctor appearing as the Great Big Huge Bear; and the Rose and the ring, in which he played Kutasoff Hedzoff and our mother Countess Gruffanuff, while John A. Andrew, not yet Governor, made an unforgettable Prince Bulbo. It was a matter of course to us children, that Papa and Mamma should play with us, sing to us, tell us stories, bathe our bumps, and accompany us to the dentist; these were things thatnly guests at Green Peace. Some of us remember Kossuth's visit; our mother often told of the day when John Brown knocked at the door, and she opened it herself. To all of us, Charles Sumner and his brothers, Albert and George, Hillard, Agassiz, Andrew, Parker were familiar figures, and fit naturally into the background of Green Peace. Of these Charles Sumner, always the Doctor's closest and best-beloved friend, is most familiarly remembered. We called him the harmless giant ; and one of us
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: little Sammy: the Civil War 1859-1863; aet. 40-44 (search)
r; we must turn back to its opening year to record an episode of importance to her and to others. In the autumn of 1861 she went to Washington in company with Governor and Mrs. Andrew, Mr. Clarke and the Doctor, who was one of the pioneers of the Sanitary Commission, carrying his restless energy and indomitable will from camp tMrs. Andrew, Mr. Clarke and the Doctor, who was one of the pioneers of the Sanitary Commission, carrying his restless energy and indomitable will from camp to hospital, from battlefield to bureau. She longed to help in some way, but felt that there was nothing she could do — except make lint, which we were all doing. I could not leave my nursery to follow the march of our armies, neither had I the practical deftness which the preparing and packing of sanitary stores demanded. Somece of Abraham Lincoln, exclaiming, while the tears rolled down his cheeks,-- Sing it again! (Our mother met Lincoln in 1861, and was presented to him by Governor Andrew. After greeting the party, the President seated himself so near the famous portrait of Washington by Gilbert Stuart as naturally to suggest some compar
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
ht the matchless mood In which impassioned Petrarch sang of thee; But this I know,--the world its plenitude May keep, so I may share thy beggary. J. W. H. After the two real homes, Green Peace and Lawton's Valley, the Chestnut Street house was nearest to our hearts; this, though we were there only three years, and though it was there that we children first saw the face of sorrow. It was an heroic time. The Doctor was in constant touch with the events of the war. He was sent by Governor Andrew to examine conditions of camps and hospitals, in Massachusetts and at the seat of war; he worked as hard on the Sanitary Commission, to which he had been appointed by President Lincoln, as on any other of his multifarious labors: his knowledge of practical warfare and his grasp of situations gave him a foresight of coming events which seemed well-nigh miraculous. When he entered the house, we all felt the electric touch, found ourselves in the circuit of the great current. So, these
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the wider outlookv1865; aet. 46 (search)
as he called us down to hear the news, come vividly before us to-day, one of the clearest impressions of our youth. Our mother went with him next day to hear Governor Andrew's official announcement of the murder to the Legislature, and heard with deep emotion his quotation from MacBETHeth :-- Besides, this Duncan Hath borne hie end, or lose it forever. The move to Boylston Place was in November. Early in the month a frisking took place, with amusing results. Our mother went with Governor and Mrs. Andrew and a gay party to Barnstable for the annual festival and ball. The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company acted as escort, and — according toMrs. Andrew and a gay party to Barnstable for the annual festival and ball. The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company acted as escort, and — according to custom — the band of the Company furnished the music. For some reason — the townspeople thought because the pretty girls were all engaged beforehand for the dance — the officer in command stopped the music at twelve o'clock, to the great distress of the Barnstable people who had ordered their carriages at two or later. The pa
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
Andrew Johnson. vetoed the bill for the Freedmen's Bureau. The reading of the veto was received by the Senate with intense, though suppressed, excitement. Governor Andrew read it to us. It was specious, and ingeniously overstated the scope and powers demanded for the Bureau, in order to make its withholdment appear a liberal aned to have written this veto. At her first reading, she had an excellent audience. The rooms were well filled and there were many men of note there. . . . Governor Andrew brought me in. Sam Hooper was there. I read The Fact Accomplished. They received it very well. I was well pleased with my reception. The next day she waission: accordingly she went to Washington, anxious to help if she might. She saw the President of the Senate, who promised support. While there she writes: Governor Andrew took me to General Grant's, where I saw the General, with great satisfaction. Prayed at bedtime that I might not become a superficial sham and humbug. Hea
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
ution, not sending his voice out. He was much and deservedly glorified by other speakers, and, indeed, his appearance on this occasion was most touching and interesting. Phillips was very fine; Huntington was careful, polished, and interesting. Andrew read the resolutions, with a splendid compliment to Chev. Some months before this, in August, 1866, the Cretans had risen against their Turkish oppressors, and made a valiant struggle for freedom. From the first the Doctor had been deeply inthe Greek banner, and slept under the Greek stars, wrapped in his shaggy capote. His appeal in behalf of Crete roused the evergenerous heart of Boston. Committees were formed, and other meetings were held, among them that just described. Governor Andrew's splendid compliment to him was given thus:-- I venture, Mr. Chairman, to make one single suggestion — that if all of us were dumb to-night, if the eloquent voices which have stimulated our blood and inspired our hearts had been silent a
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
ryday life could not fail to bring about a corresponding drop in our mother's mental barometer. Vexations awaited her. The Boylston Place house had been let for a year, and — Green Peace being also let on a long lease — the reunited family took refuge for the winter in the Doctor's wing of the Perkins Institution. Again, an extremely unfavorable critique of Later Lyrics in a prominent review distressed her greatly; her health was more or less disturbed; above all, the sudden death of John A. Andrew, the beloved and honored friend of many years, saddened both her and the Doctor deeply. All these things affected her spirits to some extent, so that the Journal for the remainder of 1867 is in a minor key. ... In despair about the house.... On hearing of the separation of Charles Sumner from his wife:-- For men and women to come together is nature — for them to live together is art — to live well, high art. November 21. Melancholy, thinking that I did but poorly last ev
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
climate, besides a great promise of future prosperity and eminence. Kansas Travel in Minnesota was living romance. Travel in Kansas is living history. I could not cross its borders, new as these are, without unlocking a volume of the past, written in blood and in prayer, and sealed with the forfeit of noble lives. A ghostly army of warriors seemed to escort me as I entered the fair, broad territory. John Brown, the captain of them, stretched his hand to the Capitol, and Sumner, and Andrew, and Howe were with him. Here was the stand made, here the good fight begun, which, before it was well under way, divided the thought and sentiment of Europe, as well as those of America. My tired spirit sought to shake off at this point the commonplace sense of weariness and annoyance. To be in Kansas, and that for work, not for pastime. To bring the woman's word where the man's rough sword and spade had once wrought together, this was poetry, not prose. To be cold, and hungry, and w
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
The Journal tells in February of the opening of the colored people's department; very interesting. A numerous assemblage of them showed a wide range of types. Music, military, drumming especially good.. Saw in their exhibit a portrait of John A. Andrew which looked like a greeting from the old heroic time. The Woman's Department was formally opened on March 3, though it had really been open, to the public since early January. The day was one of the gayest in the history of the Expositio pretty hexagonal platform had been arranged. Behind this was a fine portrait of Abraham Lincoln, with a vase of beautiful flowers [gladiolus and white lilies] at its base. I spoke of Dr. Channing, Garrison, Theodore Parker, Charles Sumner, John A. Andrew, Lucretia Mott, and Wendell Phillips, occupying about an hour. They gave me a fine basket of flowers and sang my Battle Hymn. Afterwards the Alabama cadets visited us. We gave them tea, cake and biscuits and I made a little speech for them.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
ite head trembling; then her voice joined in, as Whitney sang, in the beauty of the lilies, and by the time he had reached the words,-- as he died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, the whole vast audience was on its feet, sobbing and singing at the top of its thousands of lungs. If volunteers were really needed for the Philippines, McKinley could have had us all right there. the same evening she went to Unitarian meeting in Tremont Temple, where read my screed about Governor Andrew, which has cost me some work and more anxiety. Rev. S. A. Eliot, whom I saw for the first time, was charmingly handsome and friendly. I was introduced as Saint Julia and the whole audience rose when I came forward to read. Item: I had dropped my bag with my manuscript in the carriage, but Charles fox telephoned to the stable and got it for me. the spring of this year saw an epidemic of negrolynching, which roused deep indignation throughout the country. On May 20 the Journal rec
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