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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 3 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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appointed to take command of the Massachusetts troops at the front, and to fill the vacancy occasioned by the promotion of General Butler to be a major-general of volunteers. General Peirce was succeeded in command of Fort Warren by Brigadier-General Joseph Andrews, who remained on duty there, and at Camp Cameron, in Cambridge, until Nov. 18, 1861. On the 21st of May, the Fourth Battalion of Rifles, Major Samuel H. Leonard, was ordered to Fort Independence, where it was recruited to a regimenment time and money in making the forts habitable, and by putting them in a condition to defend the harbor, and maintain garrisons. The Governor, on the 25th of April, appointed the three major-generals of militia,—Messrs. Sutton, Morse, and Andrews,—with a portion of their respective staff, an examining board to pass upon the qualification of persons elected officers of new companies. This board remained in service until the 24th of May, when it was relieved from further duties. The numb
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 14: the minister's wooing, 1857-1859. (search)
s that instinctively goes right to the organic elements of human nature, whether under a white skin or a black, and which disregards as trivial the conventional and factitious notions which make so large a part both of our thinking and feeling. Works of imagination written with an aim to immediate impression are commonly ephemeral, like Miss Martineau's Tales, and Elliott's Corn-law Rhymes; but the creative faculty of Mrs. Stowe, like that of Cervantes in Don Quixote and of Fielding in Joseph Andrews, overpowered the narrow specialty of her design, and expanded a local and temporary theme with the cosmopolitanism of genius. It is a proverb that There is a great deal of human nature in men, but it is equally and sadly true that there is amazingly little of it in books. Fielding is the only English novelist who deals with life in its broadest sense. Thackeray, his disciple and congener, and Dickens, the congener of Smollett, do not so much treat of life as of the strata of socie
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
have afforded variety of hints for a painter of Hogarth's turn. They talked there upon all subjects,--politicks, religion, and trade,--some tolerably well, but most of them ignorantly. The next morning the Doctor kept his room, reading Montaigne's Essays, a strange medley of subjects, and particularly entertaining. On Sunday he was asked out to dinner, but found our table chat was so trivial and trifling that I mention it not. After dinner I read the second volume of The adventures of Joseph Andrews, and thought my time well spent. Dr. Hamilton, one of the most entertaining of American travellers, appears to advantage even beside the urbanity of Byrd and the sprightliness of Mrs. Knight. Bent upon no special errand, he observed freely, and all the more so, one suspects, because of his detachment. Such a quality was not so easy during the next generation, when the wars between the French and English in America, the beginnings of colonial, and then national, pride, the growth of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
30, 132, 144 Adams and liberty, 179 Addison, 94, 109, I12, 113, 1x6, l18, 159, 233, 234, 237, 238, 244, 254, 256 Address to the Freemen of South Carolina, an, 148 Address to the House of burgesses, 142 Address to the people of the state of New York, an (John Jay), 148 Address to the people of the state of New York (Melancthon Smith), 148 Address to the Supreme being, 161 Ad Thamesin, 3 Adulateur, the, 217 Adventures of Captain Bonneville, 210 Adventures of Joseph Andrews, the, 12 Adventures of Robin day, the, 311 Advertisements for the Unexperienced planters of New-England, 17 Advice to such as would remove to America, etc., 101 Afloat and ashore, 302, 305 Ages, the, 262 Agrippa, Letters of, 148 Aiken, G. L., 227 Aimard, Gustave, 325 Akenside, 165, 263, 263 n. A l'abri, 241 Alarm to the legislature of the province of New York, an, 136 Alciphron, 81 Alcott, Amos Bronson, 333, 336-339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 345, 347 Alcott, L