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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 224. expedition to Ossabaw, Ga. (search)
aissance in the direction of Vernonsburg — a village on the Vernon River, of Georgia--which we made to-day, was made in force. Our force consisted of the gunboat Ottawa, Captain Stevens, the flagship of Captain C. R. P. Rodgers, of the Wabash; the Seneca, Captain Ammen, the Pembina, Captain John Bankhead, and the Mary Andrews, in command of Acting Master Mathews, late of the Quaker City. We left Port Royal yesterday (Tuesday) at noon, and, the Ottawa leading, followed by the Pembina and Mary Andrews in the line, steamed south, and at sundown anchored in Cockspur harbor, off Tybee Island, Savannah River. The Seneca came in half an hour later. As we passed over the bar the water was dotted by hundreds and thousands of wild ducks of every variety, which lazily flapped their wings and sailed slowly away, without exhibiting the least alarm at our presence. The waters hereabout are black with water fowl, and I am told that they have but just begun to arrive. Throughout the winter milli
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Final Chapter: the faithful but less conspicuous laborers. (search)
he Western Sanitary Commission (and there were none more efficient anywhere) were, Miss Carrie C. McNair, Miss N. A. Shepard, Miss C. A. Harwood, Miss Rebecca M. Craighead, Miss Ida Johnson, Mrs. Dorothea Ogden, Miss Harriet N. Phillips, Mrs. A. Reese, Mrs. Maria Brooks, Mrs. Mary Otis, Miss Harriet Peabody, Mrs. M. A. Wells, Mrs. Florence P. Sterling, Miss N. L. Ostram, Mrs. Anne Ward, Miss Isabella M. Hartshorn, Mrs. Mary Ellis, Mrs. L. E. Lathrop, Miss Louisa Otis, Mrs. Lydia Leach, Mrs. Mary Andrews, Mrs. Mary Ludlow, Mrs. Hannah A. Haines and Mrs. Mary Allen. Most of these were from St. Louis or its vicinity. The following, also for the most part from St. Louis, were appointed somewhat later by the Western Sanitary Commission, but rendered excellent service. Mrs. M. I. Ballard, Mrs. E. O. Gibson, Mrs. L. D. Aldrich, Mrs. Houghton, Mrs. Sarah A. Barton, Mrs. Olive Freeman, Mrs. Anne M. Shattuck, Mrs. E. C. Brendell, Mrs. E. J. Morris, Miss Fanny Marshall, Mrs. Elizabeth A. Ni
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Index of names of women whose services are recorded in this book. (search)
ervices are recorded in this book. Adams, Miss H. A., 48-53. Adams, Miss Martha, 407. Alcott, Miss Louise M., 411. Aldrich, Mrs. L. D., 408. Aldrich, Milly, 59. Allen, Mrs. Mary, 408. Allen, Miss Sarah, 406. Anderson, Mrs. Robert, 408. Andrews, Emma, 58. Andrews, Mrs. Mary, 408. Archer, Mrs., 53. Armstrong, Miss, 209. Bailey, Mrs., 301. Ballard, Mrs. M. I., 408. Balustier, Mrs., 301. Barker, Mrs. C. V., 409. Barker, Mrs. Stephen, 186, 200-211. Barlow, Mrs. Arabella Griffith, Andrews, Mrs. Mary, 408. Archer, Mrs., 53. Armstrong, Miss, 209. Bailey, Mrs., 301. Ballard, Mrs. M. I., 408. Balustier, Mrs., 301. Barker, Mrs. C. V., 409. Barker, Mrs. Stephen, 186, 200-211. Barlow, Mrs. Arabella Griffith, 62, 225-233. Barnett, Mrs., 89. Bartlett, Miss Mary E., 412. Bartlett, Mrs. Abner, 58. Barton, Mrs. Sarah A., 408. Barton, Miss Clara Harlowe, 47, 111- 132. Beck, Mrs. 157, 159. Bell, Miss Susan J., 408. Bellows, Mrs. H. W., 302. Bennett, Miss, 89. Bennison, Mrs. R. H., 409. Bickerdyke, Mrs. Mary A., 48, 163, 165-170, 172-186, 209. Bissell, Miss Lucy J., 406. Booth, Mrs., 78. Bradford, Miss Charlotte, 153, 301, 316. Bradley, Miss Amy M., 212-224, 301, 316. Brayton, Miss
r better or worse. Her death was as much a martyrdom to some of the South's brave defenders as though she had by the process of transfusion, given the last of her precious blood unto their veins for the preservation of their lives,--the necessary destruction of her own. Leaving her business, the source of her support, her little less noble devotion to the youth of her native place, Norfolk, the cradle of the historic greatness of our American "more than Florence Nightingale," Miss Mary Andrews,--leaving these, and all the comforts of home, parents, relatives, and friends, she came the first one of the many noble ones as she — came to this dull village, "the hospital town,"--came all alone, as to females, into this great bazaar, the Smith Hospital,--came not as the curious come, to see, to speak an idle word or two of intended comfort, to administer, perchance, for form's sake, with dissembled yet not hidden distaste, some slight material comfort to the sick soldiers — came n