Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Andrews or search for Andrews in all documents.

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. Frederick Steele, the Fourth artillery under Lieutenant Lathrop, and a company of cavalry under Captain Stanley, and finally Totten's battery, with also two pieces from Sigel's brigade, to drive the Confederates back. Col. Jordan E. Cravens, of Governor Rector's staff, fought with Capt. Reiff's company at Dug Springs. Lyon, believing it was the intention of the Confederates to draw him away from his supplies, retired to Springfield, while 2,000 regulars, under Major Sturgis and Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews, remained about four miles from the town. Meanwhile, the Confederates from Missouri and Arkansas moved down to Cassville, which is about fifteen miles north of the northern boundary of Arkansas, in Barry county, Mo. Maj. J. M. Schofield, of the First Missouri regiment, in his report as acting adjutant-general of the Federal army, said that General Lyon determined to make a night march on the 7th, with his entire force, toward Cassville, direct upon the front of the Confederate pos
the column halted and the men lay on their arms till early dawn, when the march was resumed, Captain Plummer's battalion of regular infantry in advance, Major Osterhaus' battalion of Missouri volunteers following with Captain Totten's battery. At about 4 o'clock a. m. the enemy's picket was reached, and fled upon our approach. Major Osterhaus' battalion was then sent on the right as skirmishers, Captain Plummer being on the left, and the First regiment Missouri volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews, brought forward to the support of Totten's battery. With this disposition, the column moved forward about one and a half mile, when at about 5 o'clock a brisk skirmish was opened along our entire front. The enemy was now discovered in considerable force, occupying the crest of a ridge running nearly perpendicularly to our line of march, and also to the valley of Wilson's creek, and lying between us and his main camp. The First Missouri volunteers was now sent forward and depl