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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 10 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 8 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.19 (search)
kneeling or seated lines, drummers, guards, executioners, and pages. The tall, clean-faced, and large-lustrous-eyed Mtesa rose, advanced, and shook hands. I was invited to be seated; and then there followed a mutual inspection. We talked about many things, principally about Europe and Heaven. The inhabitants of the latter place he was very anxious about, and was specially interested in the nature of angels. Ideas of those celestial spirits, picked up from the Bible, Paradise Lost, Michael Angelo, and Gustave Dore, enabled me to describe them in bright and warm colours. Led away by my enthusiasm, I may have exaggerated somewhat! However, I was rewarded with earnest attention, and, I do believe, implicit belief! Every day while I stayed, the barzah was kept up with ceremony. One afternoon Mtesa said, Stamlee, I want you to show my women how white men can shoot. (There were about nine hundred of them.) We adjourned the barzah, and proceeded to the lake shore. The ladies
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.27 (search)
those who would coax Kruger out of his sulks, and prefer to fawn on him instead of resenting his cruel treatment of his fellow-countrymen. They profess to believe in the piety of the Boers, and their love of peace; they dwell on Kruger's attachment to the Bible, and believe him to be a dear, good old fellow, likely at any time to amaze the world by generous and just conduct. Within a few hours, I believe I could carve a fair likeness of Kruger out of a piece of tough wood, because no Michael Angelo is needed to do justice to his rugged features and ungainly form, and I would be willing to guarantee that justice to the English would be sooner given by that wooden image than it will be by Mr. Kruger; on that I pin my faith in my perception of what is Kruger's true character. Were either Russia, or Germany, in our position towards South Africa, things could not have come to this pass. Certainly the American Government would not have remained so long blind, not only to duty, but to
the rotunda. The dome of St. Sophia at Constantinople is an oblate semi-spheroid 104 feet in diameter, 201 feet high. It is said to be built of earthenware and pumice-stone, not of cut stone. It was built in the sixth century. The dome in the Duomo of Florence was built by Brunelleschi in 1417. It is of brick, octagonal in plan, 139 feet in diameter, and 310 feet in hight. The dome of St. Peter's, at Rome, was built at the close of the sixteenth century, from designs left by Michael Angelo. It is 139 feet in diameter, 330 feet high. The dome of St. Paul's, at London, by Sir Christopher Wren, is not masonry, but a shell inclosing the brick cone which supports the lantern. It is 112 feet in diameter, 215 feet high. Internal Diameter.Internal Hight. Mosque of Achmet, Constantinople92120 Duomo at Milan57254 Hall aux Bles, Paris, by Moulineau200150 St. Isaac's, Petersburg96150 Baths of Caracalla112116 The dome of the Capitol, Washington, is 287 feet 11 inches
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Leaves from a Roman diary: February, 1869 (Rewritten in 1897) (search)
so during the service we had an excellent opportunity to study Michael Angelo's Last Judgment — for there was nothing else to be done. Kugortal hide in the other. This is not a pleasant spectacle; but Michael Angelo did not paint for other people's pleasure, but rather to satisfathered together above and the sinners are hurled down below. Michael Angelo's saints and apostles look like vigorous men of affairs, and ar to much after all. All this shows what a heart there was in Michael Angelo, and dissipates the assertion of a recent English biographer that Michael Angelo painted masks instead of faces, with little or no expression. After the service we went into St. Peter's with the ladiesm, until we reached the ancient Capitol of Rome, rearranged by Michael Angelo. Here we stood before the equestrian statue of Marcus Aureliusere to witness the fatiguing spectacles of Easter. One look at Michael Angelo's Last judgment would be worth the whole of it to me. P-- is
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Centennial Contributions (search)
ties. In his persistent reserve, in the seriousness of his delineation, and in his indifference to the opinions of others, Hawthorne reminds us somewhat of Michael Angelo; but he is one of the most unique figures among the world's geniuses. action and royal abandon which greets us in Shakespeare's and Plutarch's Cleopatra. S pretty good Venuses, but we cannot look at them through the same mental and moral atmosphere as the cotemporaries of Scopas, or even with the same eyes that Michael Angelo did. We feel the difference between a modern Venus and an ancient one. There is a statue in the Vatican of a Roman emperor, of which every one says that it omith was the more dramatic. He also resembled Goldsmith in his small financial difficulties. In his persistent reserve, in the seriousness of his delineation, and in his indifference to the opinions of others, Hawthorne reminds us somewhat of Michael Angelo; but he is one of the most unique figures among the world's geniuses.
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 66: Italy and Switzerland (search)
Portia Roma the special thing to see was the statue of Dante; that was like meeting the picture of a well-known friend. Later we visited the house which was said to be his home when in Florence. We also delighted our eyes with the home of Michael Angelo. Indeed, there was nothing remarkable about it except the feeling we had that it was where Michael Angelo had lived. The most interesting things to me in Florence were those in line of record about Savonarola. Our visit extended to what Michael Angelo had lived. The most interesting things to me in Florence were those in line of record about Savonarola. Our visit extended to what is called St. Mark's Square, and particularly St. Mark's Church where Savonarola had preached. We went into the monastery which the guide told us contained Savonarola's cell. In the monastery we found a monument that had been erected to his memory. It is still doubtful whether this magnificent preacher of the truth should be classed with churchmen or statesmen; perhaps with both. In the morning of Wednesday June 4, 1884, we crossed the Apennines, enjoying the grand scenery all the time we
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, chapter 7 (search)
ust be a change only one degree more important than going to sleep; for what the mind wants to develop it, it must have, here or elsewhere. A death from love would be perfectly natural. Reasons why there are no good monuments? I must write upon this subject. March, 1840. Fuller Mss. i. 429 She had fancies, as Mr. Emerson tells us, about days and precious stones and talismans; and in one of her letters I find these reveries about proper names:-- It pleases that Raphael and Michael Angelo should have received the archangelic names; it seems inspiration in the parents. So that Swedenborg should bear the name of Emanuel, and Kant, too. The name of Beethoven's mother does not seem without meaning. In writing yesterday, I observed the names of Mary and Elizabeth meeting again in the two queens with some pleasure. William is the Conqueror. Perhaps it is from such association that I thought from earliest childhood I could never love one that bore another name; I am glad it
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 16: letters between husband and wife. (search)
ted; they would save me money in order that they may get it for themselves. Yet I try to keep the peace with them; there are bad people everywhere, and these, so interested and vulgar, are at least not treacherous like Giuditta. Adieu, love. Thy M. [It illustrates the kind of people among whom Madame Ossoli was at this time living, that this Ser Giovanni, who was her scribe in illness and the one person who was good to her, was all the time amusing himself with the effort to seduce Angelo's nurse, who was, according to another letter, the loveliest young woman in the village, and whose beauty was to Madame Ossoli a source of constant anxiety, in view of the neighborhood of Garibaldi's half-brigand troops, and those from Naples who were worse. It was amid such solicitudes and vexations that an inexperienced and exhausted mother had to struggle for life in behalf of her baby and herself.] From Madame Ossoli. Rieti, Tuesday, 26th September, 1848. Now we begin to be really
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 17: closing scenes. (search)
and was buried beneath the waves in tie harbor of Gibraltar. There they were detained a week by adverse winds, setting sail again June 9. Two days after, little Angelo was also attacked with smallpox, and was restored with difficulty. At noon of July 18 they were off the coast of New Jersey; the weather was thick, the officer ilittle plank like that from which Mrs. Hasty, ere landing, had been twice washed off. So at least it may well have seemed to those on board. All we know is that Angelo was in the steward's arms to be taken on shore, when the deck was swept away; and that, by Mrs. Hasty's account, the sailors had just persuaded her [Madame Ossolitreasures reached the land,--the beautiful body of her child, and a trunk holding the letters that had passed between herself and her husband. The body of little Angelo was placed in a seaman's chest, while his rough playmates stood tearfully around, and was afterwards buried among the sand-hills; to be at last disinterred and br
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 11 (search)
ers which effected the most. Which has struck the heaviest blows at the English aristocracy, the efforts of those who stood nearest, or the sight and example of America, as she loomed up in gigantic proportions? Mr. President, they say that Michael Angelo once entered a palace at Rome where Raphael was ornamenting the ceiling, and as Angelo walked round, he saw that all the figures were too small for the room. Stopping a moment, he sketched on one side an immense head proportioned to the chamAngelo walked round, he saw that all the figures were too small for the room. Stopping a moment, he sketched on one side an immense head proportioned to the chamber; and when his friends asked him why, his reply was, I criticise by creation, not by finding fault. Carver and Bradford did so. They came across the water, created a great model state, and bade England take warning. The Edinburgh Reviewer may be seen running up and down the sides of the Pilgrims, and taking their measure,--where does he get his yardstick? He gets it from the very institutions they made for him. [Applause.] He would never have known how to criticise, if their creations had
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