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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
The last number I am told contains a very complimentary article on Hyperion, written by Samuel Ward. January 4. A happy New Year to you and Mrs. Greene, and Ponto. May your plans thrive. I wish you could give up article-writing and the thought of making translations, and apply yourself entirely to your Opus Maximum. Ranke, the historian of the Popes, I know. He is an ardent, lively, indefatigable person. He once obtained permission to search the manuscripts of the Vatican. Mai Angelo Mai, 1782-1854; discoverer of Cicero de Republica and other palimpsests, and at one time Librarian of the Vatican. attended him, and they took down a volume which contained several different things; Ranke at once struck upon a manuscript upon the Inquisition. Mai tore this out of the book and threw it aside. The French had the Vatican in their hands ten or more years. It is strange they did not bring out its hidden treasures. I like Ranke better than Von Raumer. Both are professors at B
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, January 4. (search)
January 4. A happy New Year to you and Mrs. Greene, and Ponto. May your plans thrive. I wish you could give up article-writing and the thought of making translations, and apply yourself entirely to your Opus Maximum. Ranke, the historian of the Popes, I know. He is an ardent, lively, indefatigable person. He once obtained permission to search the manuscripts of the Vatican. Mai Angelo Mai, 1782-1854; discoverer of Cicero de Republica and other palimpsests, and at one time Librarian of the Vatican. attended him, and they took down a volume which contained several different things; Ranke at once struck upon a manuscript upon the Inquisition. Mai tore this out of the book and threw it aside. The French had the Vatican in their hands ten or more years. It is strange they did not bring out its hidden treasures. I like Ranke better than Von Raumer. Both are professors at Berlin. Our countryman, Dr. Robinson, Dr. Edward Robinson, 1794-1863; a distinguished Biblical schol
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
To Thomas Crawford. Boston, Aug. 1, 1843. my dear Crawford,—The Orpheus has not arrived, though from your letter I am led to expect it daily. I cannot disguise from you my trouble with regard to the placing of it. The Athenaeum possesses a very considerable collection of sculpture exhibited in a room originally contrived as an evening lecture-room, without any reference to the object to which it is now applied. It is dark, and with cross lights. The magnificent Day and Night of Michael Angelo, with their bold beauties, can be discerned only imperfectly, while busts and other smaller works of sculpture lose their effect. The Orpheus must not go there; but where to put it we are at a loss. It has been proposed to exhibit it in a room in another part of the town, and afterwards remove it to one of the smaller rooms of the Athenaeum. But I feel unwilling to superintend its removal twice: it must take its permanent place on the pedestal when it is unboxed. The effect of the st
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
with visits to the many fine buildings erected by the present King of Bavaria, and to the numberless fresco-paintings with which he has covered their walls. The Glyptothek——an affected name for a statuegallery—is, on the whole, the most beautiful, merely beautiful building I ever saw; and there is a school of painting there, which, for the wideness and boldness of its range, and the number of artists attached to it, is a phenomenon the world has not seen since the days of Raffaelle and Michael Angelo. It has already done a great deal, and if it continues to thrive for forty or fifty years more, as it has for the last twenty, so that there will be time for it to settle and ripen, to assume its proper character and reach its appropriate finish, it will produce works that will revive the great period of the art. But it seems to me as if the spirit of the times were against it, and as if an age too late, of which Milton fancied he felt the influences, were indeed to prevent the ripening<
that he did not appreciate pictures or statuary. He refused to admire the Marcus Aurelius at the Capitol, though I took him to see it especially because it was equestrian: I thought he would like the horse. I went with him to the Vatican, but he passed straight through the wonderful gallery of marble and never wanted to linger; he did not care for the Apollo or the Laocoon. He got tired of the Sistine Chapel, and poked fun at me when I wanted to look once more at the Last Judgment of Michael Angelo. He would not pretend. He was blind always to the beauties of art. I don't think he could ever tell a good picture from a bad one. In the same way he was utterly deaf to music. He never knew one tune from another; he thought he could distinguish Hail to the Chief, it was played so often for him; but if it was changed for Yankee Doodle he did not know the difference. I more than once heard him say at balls, he could dance very well if it wasn't for the music; that always put him ou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
e. But Valentine has already achieved, abroad and at home, a name which will not die. Circumstances have combined to trammel and hinder him in his onward career. The fortunes of war have affected his success. We all remember how grand old Michael Angelo's noble creations were interfered with when armies beleagured his beloved Florence; and, reasoning from the greater to the less, we can well understand how our modern sculptor has fared in his war-smitten city and State. Edward Virginius Ve under his instruction, he set out again for the goal of his desires. Italy, the shrine of all the arts. He lingered in intoxicated delight amid the galleries of Milan, Verona, Florence, Rome, going even as far south as Naples. He studied Michael Angelo and John of Bologna, and the splendid antique of the Vatican, and mulitudes of the old masters and the modern ones, until his whole nature was saturated, as it were, and he became restless to put to account the stores he was laying up. He ret
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 13: the Boston Radical Club: Dr. F. H. Hedge (search)
Protestant divine, Athanase Coquerel, spoke of religion and art in their relation to each other. After a brief but interesting review of classic, Byzantine, and mediaeval art, M. Coquerel expressed his dissent from the generally received opinion that the Church of Rome had always been foremost in the promotion and patronage of the fine arts. The greatest of Italian masters, he averred, while standing in the formal relations with that church, had often shown opposition to its spirit. Michael Angelo's sonnets revealed a state of mind intolerant of ecclesiastical as of other tyranny. Raphael, in the execution of a papal order, had represented true religion by a portrait figure of Savonarola. Holbein and Rembrandt were avowed Protestants. He considered the individuality fostered by Protestantism as most favorable to the development of originality in art. With these views Colonel Higginson did not agree. He held that Christianity had reached its highest point under the dispensat
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 18: birds of passage (search)
the Bar. Apart from these, it may be truly said that the little volume called Flower de Luce was the last collection published by him which recalled his earlier strains. His volume Ultima Thule appeared in 1880, and In the Harbor, classed as a second part to it, but issued by others after his death. With these might be placed, though not with any precision, the brief tragedy of Judas Maccabaeus, which had been published in the Three Books of Song, in 1872; and the unfinished fragment, Michael Angelo, which was found in his desk after death. None of his dramatic poems showed him to be on firm ground in respect to this department of poesy, nor can they, except the Golden Legend, be regarded as altogether successful literary undertakings. It is obvious that historic periods differ wholly in this respect; and all we can say is that while quite mediocre poets were good dramatists in the Elizabethan period, yet good poets have usually failed as dramatists in later days. Longfellow's e
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Appendix II: Bibliography (search)
9. Kavanagh: a Tale. Boston. 1850. The Seaside and the Fireside. Boston. 1851. The Golden Legend. Boston. 1855. The Song of Hiawatha. Boston. 1858. The Courtship of Miles Standish. Boston. 1863. Tales of a Wayside Inn. Boston. 1867. Flower-de-Luce. Boston. 1868. The New England Tragedies. Boston. 1867-70. Dante's Divine Comedy. A Translation. Boston. 1871. The Divine Tragedy. Boston. 1872. Christus: a Mystery. Boston. Three Books of Song. Boston. 1874. Aftermath. Boston. 1875. The Masque of Pandora, and other Poems. Boston. 1876-79. [Editor.] Poems of Places. 31 vols. Boston. 1878. Keramos, and other Poems. Boston. 1880. Ultima Thule. Boston. 1882. In the Harbor. Boston. 1883. Michael Angelo. Boston. 1886. A Complete Edition of Mr. Longfellow's Poetical and Prose Works, in 11 volumes, with introductions and notes, was published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., Boston.
s, and such cultivation is experience by another name. The first attempts of all great poets are comparatively feeble. The progress even of Shakespeare, in his art, can be easily detected. No man who had never heard of him, could expect Macbeth and Lear from the author of the two gentlemen of Verona. Who could guess, from reading the "Hours of Idleness," that the author would ever write "Childe Harold?"--The first attempts of Raphael are said to have been very crude performances, and Michael Angelo's memory would not have survived his own times, had he done nothing more than us attempted for the Medici, when his genius was first discovered. We hold that experience is everything to a general; but we hold; likewise, that the experience which a youth obtains at a military school is not sufficient of itself to make a man a general. Prince Eugene, himself, who preferred for a General a man who had not risen by the regular steps, could have had no objection to experience. But it m
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