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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 125 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 79 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 35 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 28 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 17 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Santa Anna or search for Santa Anna in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
s. At the right gun of Ritter's section eight men were killed and wounded within a few minutes, leaving but three at the gun. Among the killed was Corporal Sanchez, a Spaniard, long resident in Mexico, where he had commanded a company under Santa Anna during our war with that country. He was a man of fine military education, and an accomplished linguist. When number four at the gun was shot down, Sanchez was ordered to fire the piece, but was at that moment struck by the fragment of a she Alexandria, he proceeded, on horseback, in company with Leonard Gives and brother, and Major Bynum, of Rapides, La., to the camp of the defenders. Here he found an army of men composed of every character, without discipline or order, and whom Santa Anna had characterized as the Tumultuario of the Mississippi Valley. When Mr. Johnston reached the Texan army, then under the command of General Thomas J. Rusk, though he bore letters of introduction from his old commander, General Atkinson of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
The first section, under Lieutenant Ritter was on the left, and was consequently the most severely handled. Under a fire of almost unprecedented intensity, his two guns were speedily silenced, and not long after the other two, under Lieutenant Glies. At the right gun of Ritter's section eight men were killed and wounded within a few minutes, leaving but three at the gun. Among the killed was Corporal Sanchez, a Spaniard, long resident in Mexico, where he had commanded a company under Santa Anna during our war with that country. He was a man of fine military education, and an accomplished linguist. When number four at the gun was shot down, Sanchez was ordered to fire the piece, but was at that moment struck by the fragment of a shell and thrown by it to the distance of ten feet. He asked to be removed from the spot where he fell. Sergeant Frazier, Lieutenant Ritter and Private Ben. Garst carried him to the right of the gun, and were in the act of laying him down, when Frazier
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
e prompt, but easy and firm. He was, indeed, in appearance a model for the soldier. Leaving Louisville, Mr. Johnston proceeded to New Orleans and thence to Alexandria, La. After tarrying a few days with his brother, Judge Johnston, who resided at Alexandria, he proceeded, on horseback, in company with Leonard Gives and brother, and Major Bynum, of Rapides, La., to the camp of the defenders. Here he found an army of men composed of every character, without discipline or order, and whom Santa Anna had characterized as the Tumultuario of the Mississippi Valley. When Mr. Johnston reached the Texan army, then under the command of General Thomas J. Rusk, though he bore letters of introduction from his old commander, General Atkinson of the Fifth infantry, and other distinguished persons in the States, he, with his instinctive dread of being an office seeker, quietly volunteered in the little squadron of horse, from seventy to a hundred strong. General Rusk's attention was drawn to him