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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 15 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for Susan B. Anthony or search for Susan B. Anthony in all documents.

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Slavery is dead, but Mrs. Stowe's masterpiece lives, and is likely to live with growing luster as long as our free institutions survive, which it is to be hoped will be forever. One of the most remarkable early workers in the Abolition cause was Mrs. Lucretia Mott, a little Quaker woman of Pennsylvania. The writer saw her for the last time shortly before her death. She was then acting as presiding officer of an Equal rights --meaning equal suffrage-meeting. Sitting on one hand was Susan B. Anthony, and on the other Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and next to one of them sat a stately negro. She was then an aged woman, but her eye seemed to be as bright and her movements as alert as they had ever been. Framed by her becoming Quaker bonnet, which she retained in her official position, the face of the handsome old lady would have been a splendid subject for an artist. Mrs. Mott gave much of her time and all the means she could control to the cause of the slave. She was an excee
on, the champion of women's rights; Theodore Parker, the great Boston divine; 0. B. Frothingham, another famous preacher; Thomas Wentworth Higginson, the writer; Samuel Johnson, C. L. Redmond, James Monroe, A. T. Foss, William Wells Brown, Henry C. Wright, G. D. Hudson, Sallie Holley, Anna E. Dickinson, Aaron M. Powell, George Brodburn, Lucy Stone, Edwin Thompson, Nathaniel W. Whitney, Sumner Lincoln, James Boyle, Giles B. Stebbins, Thomas T. Stone, George M. Putnam, Joseph A. Howland, Susan B. Anthony, Frances E. Watkins, Loring Moody, Adin Ballou, W. H. Fish, Daniel Foster, A. J. Conover, James N. Buffum, Charles C. Burleigh, William Goodell, Joshua Leavitt, Charles M. Denison, Isaac Hopper, Abraham L. Cox. To the above should be added the names of Alvin Stewart of New York, who issued the call for the convention that projected the Liberty party, and of John Kendrick, who executed the first will including a bequest in aid of the Abolition cause. And here must not be omitted th
es, 18; persecution of, 20; feelings against, 22; hopefulness of, 26; first presidential ticket, 28; prejudice against, 30; abuse by gentlemen, 32; women, 38; preliminary victory of, 47; denunciation of early, 49; leaders, 186-198. Adams, John Quincy, 21, 41; attempted expulsion of, from Congress, 69-71; speech in his own defense in Congress, 89. Altee, Edward P., 203. Altee, Edwin A., 203. Amalgamation, 35. Anderson Bill, 165. Andrew, Governor, of Massachusetts, Peleg's Life of, 179. Anthony, Susan B., 102, 205. Anti-Slavery, causes, 2; matter excluded from United States mails, 4; formation of party, 13; pioneers, 49-58; lecturers, 76-78; orators, 88-93; women, 100-107; mobs, 008-1 2; in Haverhill, 108; in Nantucket, 09; martyrs, 113-120; sentiment in England, 130. Anti-Slavery societies, organization, 26; in New England, 72, 74, 75, 130, 200; National, 76, 79, 87, 201. Anti-Unionist, 13. B Bacon, Benjamin C., 201. Bailey, Dr. Gamaliel, 100, 207. Ballou, Adin, 205.