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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 122 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 101 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. J. Archer or search for J. J. Archer in all documents.

Your search returned 61 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
command in a field to support a battery on my left, which seemed to be doing good service and to be much exposed. There we slept in line of battle. Early Friday morning the enemy opened a heavy fire of artillery and long range musketry on my line from their redoubts and rifle pits; but as they attempted no advance, my men were ordered to lie on the ground, and the injury inflicted was small. About eight o'clock, by order of General Lee, I occupied a piece of ground in front of Brigadier-General Archer, but finding myself strong enough to hold both, did not abandon my former position. About 9 o'clock I was ordered by Major-General Hill, as soon as you see any movement on the right or left, or hear heavy musket firing, advance also, and storm the creek. My brigade was immediately formed for the assault, and learning Brigadier-General Anderson, of Major-General Hill's division, had crossed the creek above the enemy's works, I was in the act of advancing to storm the redoubts in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
l. I may confidently assert that no unnecessary time was spent in the various skirmishes just described. About an hour and a half before dark we reached Mechanicsville, under a terrible fire of shot and shell. For a short time we were compelled to wait until we could receive orders from General Hill. Before dark, we were ordered to take our position in a road which appeared to run at right angles with the road we had previously occupied and to the left of it. Upon the appearance of General Archer, the Seventh and Twenty-eighth regiments were ordered by you to report to him, but, upon Colonel Campbell's application, we ascertained he had no immediate duty for us to perform. It was then fully dark, though the artillery conflict still continued, and, as soon as it ceased, we were ordered to take our position immediately in front of the enemy's batteries and about a quarter of a mile therefrom, being still in the front of your brigade. At this point we bivouacked for the night, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
was ordered up and formed on Gregg's right. Pender having cleared my right flank, to which service he had been assigned, Archer was sent to relieve him, thus putting him (Archer) on my extreme right. Anderson was formed on Branch's right, and FieldArcher) on my extreme right. Anderson was formed on Branch's right, and Field on his right, and connecting with Archer. Crenshaw and Johnston were brought into battery on the left of the road and in rear of Gregg's line. I had delayed the attack until I could hear from General Longstreet, and this now occurring, the order wArcher. Crenshaw and Johnston were brought into battery on the left of the road and in rear of Gregg's line. I had delayed the attack until I could hear from General Longstreet, and this now occurring, the order was given. This was about half-past 2 P. M. Gregg, then Branch, and then Anderson, successively became engaged. The incessant roar of musketry and deep thunder of artillery told that the whole force of the enemy were in my front. Branch becoming ha the vaunted Zouaves and Sykes' regulars. Pender's brigade was suffering heavily, but stubbornly held its own. Field and Archer met a withering storm of bullets, but pressed on to within a short distance of the enemy's works, but the storm was too f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
port. My order of march was Thomas, Branch, Archer, Pender, Stafford and Field. Arriving within brigade (General Taliaferro's right). Branch, Archer and Pender, as they came up, were successivelyin a wood skirting it. Branch was engaged when Archer came up, and with Pender on the left, the enemwere charged across this field, the brigade of Archer being subjected to a very heavy fire. Generalhe enemy and the two brigades just named, when Archer and Pender coming up, a general charge was madnarrow valley with their dead. In this charge Archer's brigade was subjected to a heavy fire. At the enemy was repulsed with loss. Pender's and Archer's brigades, also of Hill's division, came up ofrom the battlefield. Extract from Brigadier-General Archer's report. I advanced several hundreventh, and in the extract given from Brigadier-General Archer's report, he says that the left regimrch, and directed me to halt it in rear of General Archer, while he moved the rest of his command so[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers and losses at slaughter's mountain ( Cedar Run ) (search)
ia regiments, and Third Louisiana battalion4 1/2 Branch's Brigade--Seventh, Eighteenth, Twenty-eighth, Thirty-third and Thirty-seventh North Carolina regiments5 Archer's Brigade--First, Seventh and Fourteenth Tennessee and Nineteenth Georgia regiments and Fifth Alabama battalion4 1/2 Pender's Brigade--Sixteenth, Twenty-second, is infantry to have been 10,000, we have the average strentgh of his regiments as 357. The only portion of his command whose strength is reported at Cedar Run is Archer's brigade, which was 1,200 strong in that fight. This would give Archer's regiments but 267 each on August 9. No return of Winder's and Ewell's divisions for Archer's regiments but 267 each on August 9. No return of Winder's and Ewell's divisions for this period is to be found. Colonel Taylor estimates them together at 8,000 men; but I think he has probably overlooked the fact that these divisions contained not merely the troops that had followed Jackson in his famous Valley campaign, but two brigades and more in addition. Thus the infantry engaged in the Valley campaign and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
river until the next day. General Gregg's, General Archer's and our brigade formed the rear guard of, Brigadier-General. Extract from Brigadier-General Archer's report. Sharpsburg, 17th Sepded to officers and men for their conduct. J. J. Archer, Brigadier-General Commanding. Extract my part of the line was gallantly resisted by Archer and Thomas-Gregg still holding the extreme lef This order was promptly carried out — Pender, Archer, Thomas and Branch steadily advancing. Brancht and in his flank. Gregg, Pender, Thomas and Archer were successively thrown in The enemy obstinathe left and rear of the enemy's work. Pender, Archer and Brockenbrough were directed to gain the cr Anteitam near it mouth, and Branch, Gregg and Archer extending to the left and connecting with D. Rull tide of success. With a yell of defiance, Archer charged them, retook McIntosh's guns, and drovral Pender became hotly engaged, and informing Archer of his danger, he (Archer) moved by the left f[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
and protected only by an abatis of fallen timber, Pender, Archer and Brockenbrough were directed to gain the crest of that er the command of General Gregg, and the second of Lane's, Archer's and Brockenbrough's brigades, under command of General AGeneral Archer. * * * * * The Federal infantry lined the high banks of the Virginia shore, while the artillery, formidable in numbersis ranks, and then extending with a view to turn his left, Archer promptly formed on Pender's left, when a simultaneous charirected General Pender, with his own brigade, and those of Archer and Colonel Brockenbrough, to seize the crest, which was dneral Jones, and moved to his support with the brigades of Archer, Branch, Gregg and Pender, the last of whom was placed on nt General Jones ordered Toombs to charge the flank, while Archer, supported by Branch and Gregg, moved upon the front of thfire of artillery, the three brigades of Gregg, Pender and Archer attacked the enemy vigorously and drove them over the rive
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg. (search)
wounded in the engagement of the 1st), moved to the front and was formed in line of battle, with Archer's brigade on the right, commanded by D. B. Fry (Brigadier-General Archer having been wounded andBrigadier-General Archer having been wounded and captured on the 1st of July); Colonel Brockenbrough's brigade on the left; Pettigrew's, commanded by Colonel James K. Marshall, of the Fifty-second North Carolina, on the right centre, and Davis' on ourn the loss of many brave men and officers. Colonel D. B. Fry, Thirteenth Alabama, commanding Archer's brigade, and Colonel James K. Marshall, of the Fifty-second North Carolina, commanding Pettigrd and wounded was very great, and in officers unusually so, as may be seen from the fact that in Archer's brigade but two field officers escaped; in Pettigrew's but one, and in Davis' all were killed f July, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Early on the morning of the 1st I moved in rear of Archer's brigade, with three regiments of my command (the Eleventh Mississippi being left as a guard fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
tion of my command, I rode to the right of General Archer's brigade, which was posted in the woods sring to penetrate through the interval between Archer and himself. The attack directly in front of Archer and of Walker's guns had been gallantly repulsed, the enemy finding what shelter they could athrough that interval, turned Lane's right and Archer's left. Thus attacked in front and rear, the Fourteenth Tennessee and Nineteenth Georgia of Archer's brigade and the entire brigade of Lane fell otwithstanding the perilous situation in which Archer's brigade was placed, his right, changing fron position occupied by the brigades of Lane and Archer, and came in contact with Gregg's brigade. Tanfantry the contest became fierce and bloody. Archer and Lane repulsed that portion of the line immin overwhelming numbers and turned the left of Archer and the right of Lane. Attacked in front and er a brave and obstinate resistance, gave way. Archer held his line with the First Tennessee, and wi[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
he in person gallantly rushed them over the works upon Hooker's retreating columns. James H. Lane, Late Brigadier-General C. S. A. The above article was written at the request of Mr. Moses Handy (then connected with the Dispatch) while I was on a visit to Richmond, and unable to refer to any of my papers. After the death of Lieutenant-General Thos. J. Jackson and before the Pennsylvania campaign, Major-General A. P. Hill was appointed Lieutenant-General, and Brigadier-General Pender was made Major-General. Pender's division was composed of Lane's North Carolina, Thomas' Georgia, McGowan's South Carolina, and Scales' North Carolina brigades. The other brigades of A. P. Hill's old Light division --Archer's Tennesseeans and Brockenbrough's Virginians — formed part of a new division commanded by Major-General Heth. Soon after Hooker's defeat at Chancellorsville, we were ordered back to our winter quarters at Moss Neck, where we remained until General Lee invaded Pennsylvania