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The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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pid coolness, fighting in the ranks, with gun in hand, and stimulating his men by his words and example. W. R. Johnson and William Goff, Twenty-eighth Georgia, Sergeant J. L. Moore, privates W. A. Estes, J. S. Wingate, W. S. Walker, Isaac Hundley, Thomas Sudler, J. J. Gordon, Simson Williamson, Lieutenant B. A. Bowen, Lieutenant R. S. Tomme, Lieutenant L. D. Ford, First Sergeant Herring, Sergeant T. P. W. Bullard, Sergeant J. J. Adams, privates Mosely, McCall, J. M. Vause, J. Hutchings, Thomas Argo, J. S. Denniss, W. C. Claybanks, Joseph Herron, W. D. Tingle, and Corporal J. A. Lee, Thirteenth Alabama. The officers commanding the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Georgia regiments report that it is impossible for them to make distinctions, where so many acted with distinguished bravery. In the Twenty-seventh, every commissioned officer, except one, was killed or wounded at Sharpsburg; and this sole survivor was unwilling to discriminate among so many brave men. Brigadier-General
Mayor's Court, yesterday. --Thomas Argo was brought up on the charge of petty larceny, he having on Monday night taken the sum of 35 cents from the money drawer of Bernard Freschkorn. Argo had also flourished a pistol while engaged in the operation, and frightened Mr. F. 's family. He claimed, as do so many others taken in crime, to be a soldier; yet his Honor thought it best to commit him to jail. Anna Kearns, the same we noticed the other day as being before the court for whippinArgo had also flourished a pistol while engaged in the operation, and frightened Mr. F. 's family. He claimed, as do so many others taken in crime, to be a soldier; yet his Honor thought it best to commit him to jail. Anna Kearns, the same we noticed the other day as being before the court for whipping her husband, was arraigned on the charge of abusing and disturbing the family of Joanna H. Turner, and inasmuch as her reputation for turbulence had thus been well established, his Honor decided that a short sojourn in the jail would be of benefit to her, and gave orders accordingly. James Derney, having a strong hatred of oppression, and seeing a soldier rather roughly handled by Mr. William Mitchell, and not knowing that the last-named had been commanded to arrest the said soldier, lent