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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The capture of Mr. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States. (search)
erate States. We regret to see that in an article in the Philadelphia Times General Wilson revives the stale slander that President Davis was captured in a woman's disguise. We hope to present before long a full statement of the facts; but in the meantime we give, without alteration, the following statement of a Federal soldier who was present, and which fully offsets the statement of General Wilson, who was not present at the capture: Jeff. Davis' Alleged disguise.Portland (Maine) Argus. I am no admirer of Jeff Davis. I am a Yankee, born between Saccarappa and Gorham Corner; am full of Yankee prejudices; but I think it wicked to lie even about him, or, for the matter, about the devil. I was with the party that captured Jeff. Davis; saw the whole transaction from its beginning. I now say-and hope you will publish it — that Jeff. Davis did not have on at the time he was taken any such garment as is worn by women. He did have over his shoulders a water-proof article
May 26. A letter from Major Sprague, U. S. A., giving an account of affairs in Texas, since the arrest of the federal troops in that locality, was published in the Albany (N. Y.) Argus.--(Doc. 197.) The privateer Calhoun, Capt. Wilson, arrived at New Orleans, La., having in tow the following prizes: schooners John Adams and Mermaid, of Provincetown, Mass., and the brig Panama, of Boston, Mass.; all these are whalers, and have on board about 215 bbls. of sperm and black whale oil. They were taken about 20 miles from the passes; their crews number 63 men; and all of them told that these vessels lad been whaling for some time and cruising in the Gulf.--Natchez Courier, May 30. The Mobile Register of yesterday, after announcing the invasion of Virginia by the Federal troops, observes: Servile insurrection is a part of their programme, but they expect no great amount of practical good to result therefrom-consequently, it is contended that it would be afar better course of
quipping themselves, and to serve in that part of the district in which they might belong.--(Doc. 134.) The rebel batteries at City Point, on the James River, below Fort Darling, Va., opened fire on the Union fleet of gunboats, but the boats returned it so briskly with shell and shrapnel, that the batteries were silenced, and the rebels retired. General Wallace assumed command of the city of Memphis, Tenn. His first official act was to take possession of the office of the newspaper Argus. T. Knox and A. D. Richardson were appointed to supervise all editorials which appeared in the newspapers. Threats having been made to tear down the Union flags flying over the houses of some of the citizens of Memphis, Tenn., the Provost-Marshal of that city issued an order instructing the guard to shoot down any one attempting to haul down the flag, or offering any insult or molestation to resident citizens who had thus manifested their devotion to the Union. The United States gu
had proceeded but a short distance, however, before it was discovered that the cutter was on fire and abandoned by the rebel crew. Both boats having a considerable amount of freight on board deemed the risk too great to attempt to extinguish the flames. The Archer was stripped Saturday night, and her stores, armament, etc., were placed in the Custom-House. The boat of the cutter was secured, after the painter had burned off, by Captain Warren, of the Seventh Maine, Mr. Haile, of the Argus, and Mr. Edward Pickett. They named her the Trio, and brought her up to the city and placed her in the boat-house of the North Star Boat Club. There was no communication with the shore by any of the officers or crew of the rebels after they arrived in the harbor Friday evening. So Lieutenant Read states, and he is corroborated by the crew. Mr. Berry, Agent of the Associated Press, visited Fort Preble yesterday afternoon, saw the prisoners and got an account of the cruise from Lieutena
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
ng down the rebellion. The blockade at Vicksburg created intense exasperation among the navigators of the river, and threats of vengeance came down from Cincinnati and St. Louis. Cincinnati steamboat men have been thrown into a fever, from the Governor of Mississippi ordering cannon and a military company to Vicksburg, to hail all steamboats passing. The Abolition journals of Cincinnati howl over it, and are greatly Incensed. We would like to see them help themselves. --Memphis Evening Argus, January 17, 1861. Measures were taken by the Convention, and by the Legislature, which had reassembled, in order to give force to the Ordinance of Secession, to increase the military power of the State. The Governor, on hearing that the Chief Magistrate of Louisiana had seized the National Arsenal at Baton Rouge, with its fifty thousand small arms, heavy cannon, and munitions of war, sent Colonel C. G. Armistead, to ask him to share his plunder with his brother of Mississippi, on such
thirteen of the enemy's best cannon, and all of the accompanying carriages and ammunition. Also some four hundred prisoners, and several stand of colors, and a large quantity of good arms. My regiment fought in that part of the field where General Lyon was slain. This is a just reward for the thirty-five men and children butchered by him on the 10th of May in St. Louis. I will furnish you a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The official reports of the commanding officers of the forces engaged in the battle near Springfield, Mo., having been received, the Major-General commanding announces to the troops embraced in his command, with pride and the highest commendation, the extraordinary services to their country and flag rendered by the division of the brave and lamented General L
thirteen of the enemy's best cannon, and all of the accompanying carriages and ammunition. Also some four hundred prisoners, and several stand of colors, and a large quantity of good arms. My regiment fought in that part of the field where General Lyon was slain. This is a just reward for the thirty-five men and children butchered by him on the 10th of May in St. Louis. I will furnish you a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The official reports of the commanding officers of the forces engaged in the battle near Springfield, Mo., having been received, the Major-General commanding announces to the troops embraced in his command, with pride and the highest commendation, the extraordinary services to their country and flag rendered by the division of the brave and lamented General L
A word for the 69TH N. Y. Regiment.--An article in the Memphis (Tenn.) Argus closes thus :-- No Southerner but feels that the 69th maintained the old reputation of Irish valor, on the wrong side through misguidance, and not through treachery to the old cause; and not one of us but feels that the day must come when a true understanding of the principle at issue will range their fearless hearts in line with their brethren of the South. All honor to the 69th, even in its error.
The Portland (Me.) Argus publishes the following correspondence:-- dear Sir:--I am requested by Secretary Mallory to indite you a few lines soliciting your acceptance of a commission, commanding in the Confederate Navy of America; your pay to go on from the late of secession of your native State, (South Carolina.) Your high capabilities and qualifications as a seaman and navigator, and knowledge in angles, &c., &c., and associations of your honorable family, proclaim you to be a man uth Carolina, but, thank God, left it in my childhood days with all my family. I will take employ here before the mast, in preference to your highest encomiums. As a gentleman, I was in duty bound to reply to your letter; let it be your last to me. The American Flag — long may she wave O'er the land of the free and the traitor's grave. C. Lee Moses, A Northern-made Sailor and Unionist. The Argus states that Captain Moses is a relative of Senator Benjamin.--N. Y Evening Post, May 18.
A secession Dodge.--The Albany Atlas and Argus prints the following: We do not know how the people of Maine will regard this invasion of their soil; but we do not believe that a British regiment could ever find its way to Canada, if it landed in New-York, and sought to pass through this State. It is by such pieces of idiotic rant that the Atlas and Argus seeks to aid the rebellion. Debarred from serving the secession cause directly, it now bends its efforts to doing it indirect sereces of idiotic rant that the Atlas and Argus seeks to aid the rebellion. Debarred from serving the secession cause directly, it now bends its efforts to doing it indirect service by misinterpreting every act and traducing every measure of the Government. If, however, the readers of that journal can be influenced by any such pitiful stuff as this, it simply shows they are as much of fools as it is assumed they were when the writer ventured to pen such nonsense. New-York Times, January 15.
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