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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
tempt of the Executive Committee of the Glasgow Emancipation Society, under the influence of Captain Stuart, to follow suit in rebuffing Collins and disavowing the old organization, led to a division and reconstitution by which that important body was saved to the cause in America, at the cost of the resignation of a few members like Dr. Wardlaw (Lib. 11.77, 89, 93, 149; Mss. Feb. 23, 1841, R. Wardlaw to J. A. Collins, and May 2, 1841, Collins to W. L. G.; and Collins's letter to the Glasgow Argus, April 26, 1841). Finally, Harriet Martineau took her stand with Mr. Garrison, Collins, and their associates in the most pronounced manner (Lib. 11: 51; Ms. Feb. 20, 1841, Miss Martineau to Collins). George Thompson's open adhesion came later (Lib. 11.145, 201). The result was in all respects, pecuniary and moral, disastrous to the British and Foreign A. S. Society. We supposed he would make his appeal to the abolitionists at large and take Lib. 11.53. his chance accordingly. I fear, also,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ll be well (and, so mutable are all things here below, we can promise nothing as to the future without prefixing an if), I shall go to Albany about the 21st of April, in company with C. L. Remond, to attend an anti-slavery convention which our friends intend to get up in that city, with special reference to the Irish Address. This trip did not take place. We shall carry that Address along with us. There is a pretty large Irish population in Albany, and an Irish Repeal Association; but the Argus has had the effrontery and folly to deny the authenticity of the Address, and, of course, a meeting called with especial reference to it will be pretty sure to be well attended, and to create a wholesome excitement. In going or returning, I shall endeavor to visit Northampton (most probably on returning), and, if practicable, make Remond accompany me. I intend, if I can, to add Wendell Phillips to our company. So, you may make your arrangements, at your leisure, for at least one incendiary
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
ular only the parallel fails, as Mr. Garrison was denied the privilege of following Clarkson's remains to the grave. On October 1, in beautiful and affecting Glasgow Argus, Oct. 15, 1846. terms, at a public meeting in Glasgow, he took notice of his venerated predecessor's Repose at length, firm Friend of human kind. A feore wanton and cruel, than he had beheld within the last three or four weeks emanating from the apologists of the Free Church and the Evangelical Alliance (Glasgow Argus, Oct. 29, 1846; and see, in the Argus for Oct. 15, Mr. Garrison's dissection of a hostile article in the Scottish Guardian. Further, for charges of infidelity by DArgus for Oct. 15, Mr. Garrison's dissection of a hostile article in the Scottish Guardian. Further, for charges of infidelity by Dr. Campbell in his Christian Witness, see Lib. 17: 5, 21, 121; and by Dr. Cunningham, Lib. 17: 9). His clerical traducers never faced him in public. make me feel as though I had yet to perform much, fully to deserve them. A breakfast by invitation with George Combe, perhaps on Oct. 22, in company with Thompson, Douglass, and Buf