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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 23, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 30: Longstreet moves to Georgia. (search)
d repeated his orders for attack, and finally rode to his right wing and gave peremptory orders. Marching through the woods to line up on the left wing, the left of the right wing was found to overlap my division on the right, yet our extreme right was found to overreach the left of the enemy's field-works by two brigades, and reconnoissance found the road between the enemy and Chattanooga open and free of obstructions or troops to defend it. On the right of Breckenridge's division was Armstrong's division of cavalry dismounted, and beyond his right was Forrest's other division of cavalry, Pegram's. Some miles off from our left was Wheeler's division of cavalry, under Wharton and Martin. The Union army from left to right was: first the Fourteenth Corps, General George H. Thomas commanding, four divisions,--Baird's division on the left, then Reynolds's and Brannan's, the latter retired to position of reserve, and Negley's. (The last named had been left, on the night of the 19t
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 33: the East Tennessee campaign. (search)
s brigades constituted McLaws's division. Hood's division, which was commanded during the campaign by Brigadier-General M. Jenkins, was made up of Jenkins's, Anderson's, Benning's, Law's, and Robertson's brigades. General Wheeler's cavalry was organized into two divisions of two brigades each,--General John T. Morgan's Alabama and Colonel Cruse's Georgia brigades, under Major-General W. T. Martin; Colonels G. G. Dibbrell's Tennessee and Thomas Harrison's Texas brigades, under Brigadier-General Frank Armstrong. This made about fifteen thousand men, after deducting camp guards and foraging parties. The remote contingent that was to come from Southwest Virginia was an unknown quantity, not to be considered until it could report for service. As soon as the conference at Headquarters adjourned orders were issued for Alexander's artillery to be withdrawn from Lookout Mountain, and General McLaws was ordered to withdraw his division from the general line after night. Both commands
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 34: Besieging Knoxville. (search)
ks and marched along their front to the ditch, and was there some little time before he received the order. In his march and countermarch in front of the enemy's line he lost four killed and thirty-three wounded. As a diversion in favor of the assaulting columns, our troops on the south side were ordered to a simultaneous attack, and to get in on that side if the opportunity occurred. They were reinforced by Russell's brigade of Morgan's division of cavalry, and Harrison's brigade of Armstrong's division, dismounted, General Morgan commanding. This demonstration had the effect anticipated in detaining troops to hold on that side that were intended as reserve for the fort. Just after the troops were ordered back it occurred to me that there must be some mistake about the wire network, for some of our men had been seen mounting and passing over the parapets, but it was too late to reorganize and renew the attack, and I conceived that some of the regimental pioneers should hav
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 36: strategic importance of the field. (search)
eral Martin was ordered to press close on the enemy's rear with the balance of his force. General Armstrong followed the line of retreat, and by the use of flat-boats passed his cavalry over the Holhe enemy, and endeavor to put him to confusion. He crossed with Morgan's division, and called Armstrong's to follow, but the enemy, finding opportunity to put his force against the division, advance dash and got two of our guns and two hundred prisoners, driving us towards the river. General Armstrong crossed pending these operations and received the enemy's attack on the 28th. General B. R. Johnson's infantry division had been ordered near Dandridge, and crossed while Armstrong's command held the enemy. The latter was caught in battle from which there was no escape but to fight it ou Johnson's infantry crossed in time to march towards the enemy's rear before he could dislodge Armstrong. I rode a little in advance of Johnson's command. The enemy, advised of the approach of infa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of the Elkhorn campaign. (search)
s, even cautious. He was calm and anxious in view of the enterprise we had undertaken; but avowed his confidence in it, and co-operated heartily for its success. His whole conduct during these operations impressed us very favorably as to his capacity for war, and but for his untimely death, he would have played an important part in our struggle. His staff was limited to five or six earnest, working men, and all about him bespoke the stern seriousness of soldiers trained to arms. Frank Armstrong, Lindsay Lomax, Edward Dillon,-------Kimmell, were members of his staff, whom I found with him, all of whom served often and long with me in the stirring events of the great contest we had embarked in. A full conference with McCulloch, whose remarkable knowledge of roads and country were much relied upon in the operations of that campaign, enabled Van Dorn to organize the corps of Price and of McCulloch into an army of about 16,000 men, and to march at dawn of March 1st to attack the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Tan Dorn's report of the Elkhorn campaign. (search)
ade bore the brunt of the battle. Colonel Burbridge, Colonel Rosser, Colonel Gates, Major Souther, Major Wade, Captain McDonald and Captain Johanneberg are some of those who attracted my especial attention by their distinguished conduct. In McCulloch's division, the Louisiana regiment, under Colonel Louis Hebert, and the Arkansas regiment, under Colonel Macrae, are especially mentioned for their good conduct. Major Montgomery, Captain Bradfute, Lieutenants Lomax, Kimmel, Dillon and Frank Armstrong, A. A. G., were ever active and soldierly. After their services were no longer required with their own divisions, they joined my staff, and I am much indebted to them for the efficient aid they gave me during the engagement of the 8th. They are meritorious officers, whose value is lost to the service by their not receiving rank more accordant with their merit and experience than they now hold. Being without my proper staff, I was much gratified by the offer of Colonel Shands and Ca
s gallant brigade bore the brunt of the battle. Colonel Burbridge, Colonel Rosser, Colonel Gates, Major Lawther, Major Wade, Captain MacDonald and Captain Schaumburg are some of those who attracted my special attention by distinguished conduct. In McCulloch's division, the Louisiana regiment under Col. Louis Hŕbert, and the Arkansas regiment under Colonel McRae, are especially mentioned for their good conduct. Major Montgomery, Captain Bradfute, Lieutenants Lomax, Kimmel, Dillon and Frank Armstrong, assistant adjutant-general, were ever active and soldierly. . . . You will perceive from this report, General, that although I did not, as I hoped, capture or destroy the enemy's army in western Arkansas, I have inflicted upon it a heavy blow, and compelled him to fall back into Missouri. This he did on the 16th inst. The report of Gen. Albert Pike illustrates the confusion and consequent disasters of a minor character which overtook part of the army. General Pike, by special
Moore's and Phifer's remnants of brigades crossed and were again gobbled up, and we lost one battery. The rest of the division got up and, though greatly exhausted, managed to hold the enemy in check for two hours, the other fragments of brigades and regiments composing Hebert's division coming up feebly and supporting. We gave up the attempt to cross and fell back again and marched by another route to the south. The enemy had burned the bridge by which we now hoped to get out, but Frank Armstrong, who proved our salvation, had, with great foresight and energy, rebuilt it. The enemy did not pursue with any great vigor, and we saved everything but our wounded, and some of them. Bowen lost part of his train. We brought off two captured guns and lost five, and brought along 300 prisoners. I do not know the loss of the army. Price is reduced from 10,000 to between 5,000 and 6,000. Lovell has not suffered a great deal. The enemy's force I do not know. When we got into Corinth he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of General Earl Van Dorn. (search)
the spring of 1863 he was the chief commander of the cavalry of Bragg's army, then at Tullahoma; he had as brigade commanders Armstrong, Jackson, Cosby and Martin, and with about eight thousand men, was preparing to move across the Ohio. His commandthe precise composition of his command at that time, yet I remember that it contained the brigades of Forrest, Jackson, Armstrong, Whitfield and Cosby, numbering, perhaps, seven thousand effectives—cavalry and artillery; and I can no doubt give you ack in front and rear— Forest's brigade having gotten behind him. On the day following Forest was sent with his own and Armstrong's brigade to attack Brentwood (believed to have been weakened in order to replace the captured garrison of Franklin), athat he did not have the captured property, and could not comply with the order. (I always supposed that Forrest's and Armstrong's men appropriated most of the captured property at the moment of capture). To this Van Dorn said: Either your report t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Confederate survivor who led a Federal charge. (search)
look unlike a Yankee officer. In the main street of Selma I met an aid named Brown—a gallant fellow. He shouted to me that our line had been broken and that Armstrong was falling back, and told me to get out or I'd be taken. Just then Armstrong and his staff galloped past, and the general recognizing us, called out: You must Armstrong and his staff galloped past, and the general recognizing us, called out: You must hurry out of this, gentlemen. They are close on our heels. Brown had a dispatch for Colonel Johnson, and he said he would wait and deliver it if he died for it. While we were talking, pistols in hand, a column of Federal cavalry swung into the street where we stood, coming full tilt. We were so taken by surprise that we could ackened its mad pace. For at least a mile I rode at their head, exchanging remarks about the retreat of the Rebs, and joining in the cries of Hurry; let's catch Armstrong. As we came to a side street that ran right down to the river, I dashed out and swerved sharply, and then I rode for dear life. In a second they were after me,
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