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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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ayonet first pierced the breast of the color-bearer, and, grasping the flag, he waved it over his head in triumph. At this moment he and Lynch were both shot dead, and as Vollmer fell, emulating the ardor of these chivalrous young men, Captain J. Welby Armstrong stepped forth to capture the colors, when he also fell, grasping the flagstaff. These colors are now at General Pillow's office. The loss of Russell's brigade is as follows:--Second regiment, 18 killed, 64 wounded, 33 missing. Thirtield yesterday. For several miles the trees are torn and barked by balls, and many horses lie upon the ground, some torn open by shells and others riddled by balls. You can see innumerable stains of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed, there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death, he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. My friend Captain Billy Jackson was shot in the hip while leading a portion of Russell's brigade. I think he will re
ayonet first pierced the breast of the color-bearer, and, grasping the flag, he waved it over his head in triumph. At this moment he and Lynch were both shot dead, and as Vollmer fell, emulating the ardor of these chivalrous young men, Captain J. Welby Armstrong stepped forth to capture the colors, when he also fell, grasping the flagstaff. These colors are now at General Pillow's office. The loss of Russell's brigade is as follows:--Second regiment, 18 killed, 64 wounded, 33 missing. Thirtield yesterday. For several miles the trees are torn and barked by balls, and many horses lie upon the ground, some torn open by shells and others riddled by balls. You can see innumerable stains of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed, there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death, he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. My friend Captain Billy Jackson was shot in the hip while leading a portion of Russell's brigade. I think he will re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
November 8th.—This has been a gloomy day in camp. All day long our dead, wounded and dying were coming in by wagon loads. Many gallant men fell in the bloody action of yesterday, among whom from the list of my personal friends, were Captain J. Welby Armstrong and Lieutenant James Walker of the Second Tennessee regiment. This regiment suffered severely. I recognised the body of Captain Armstrong, as we passed over a part of the hotly contested field. There lay the gallant soldier stark deaCaptain Armstrong, as we passed over a part of the hotly contested field. There lay the gallant soldier stark dead with his face to the foe. He fell fifty yards in advance of his company. Strange emotions swept over my heart as I gazed for a moment upon the prostrate form of my friend, and then hurried on in pursuit of the retreating enemy. Then came my friend from childhood, Jimmie Walker, with a mortal wound, going back to die. I could only greet my dying friend with one word, and then on to the slaughter of men. This is the glory of war! Among the Federal prisoners are Colonel Dougherty, a Major, t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
November 8th.—This has been a gloomy day in camp. All day long our dead, wounded and dying were coming in by wagon loads. Many gallant men fell in the bloody action of yesterday, among whom from the list of my personal friends, were Captain J. Welby Armstrong and Lieutenant James Walker of the Second Tennessee regiment. This regiment suffered severely. I recognised the body of Captain Armstrong, as we passed over a part of the hotly contested field. There lay the gallant soldier stark deaCaptain Armstrong, as we passed over a part of the hotly contested field. There lay the gallant soldier stark dead with his face to the foe. He fell fifty yards in advance of his company. Strange emotions swept over my heart as I gazed for a moment upon the prostrate form of my friend, and then hurried on in pursuit of the retreating enemy. Then came my friend from childhood, Jimmie Walker, with a mortal wound, going back to die. I could only greet my dying friend with one word, and then on to the slaughter of men. This is the glory of war! Among the Federal prisoners are Colonel Dougherty, a Major, t
le field yesterday. For several miles the trees are and barked by balls, and many horses lie upon the ground, some torn open by shells and others riddled by balls. You can see innumerable stains of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. Desperate fighting — justice made out to some of the Vandals. The Avalanche has an interesting letter from a ss bayonet first pierced the breast of the color-bearer, and grasping the flag he waved it over his head in triumph. At this moment he and Lynch were both shot dead, and as Vollmer fell, emulating the ardor of these chivalrous young men, Capt. J. Welby Armstrong stopped forward to capture the colors, when he also fell grasping the flag These colors are now at Gen. Pillow's office. Another. Mr. Farrer, living near Memphis, Tenns., had a son in the fight at Columbus, who was perhaps the