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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., With Slemmer in Pensacola Harbor. (search)
his, I believe, was the first gun in the war fired on our side. Next day, January 9th, an order came from General Scott to Lieutenant Slemmer to do all in his power to prevent the seizure of the public property and to cooperate with Commodore James Armstrong at the yard. The latter received orders on the same day to cooperate with the army; but he was already so greatly under the influence of Captain Ebenezer Farrand and other secessionist officers of his command that he dared not take anyt since the night of January 7th. On the 15th Colonel W. H. Chase, commanding the enemy's forces at the yard and Barrancas, came over in a small boat with Captain Farrand (late of the United States navy, and next in rank at the yard to Commodore Armstrong) and landed at the Pickens wharf, where Lieutenant Slemmer and myself met them, and the following conversation took place: Colonel Chase: I have come on business which may occupy some time, and, if you have no objection, we had better
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
nate. Passed, February 14, 1862. The following is a list of the vessels and officers engaged in attack on Fort Henry: Gun-boat Cincinnati. R. N. Stembel, U. S. N., Commander; William R. Hoel, First Master; Oscar H. Pratt, Second Master; Charles G. Perkins, Third Master; John Pearce, Fourth Master; R. H. Attenborough, Pilot; Isaac D. Gaugh, Pilot; John Ludlow, Surgeon; Baron Proctor, Paymaster; William D. McFarland, Chief Engineer; Samuel H. Lovejoy, First Assistant Engineer; James Armstrong, Second Assistant Engineer; William J. Shannon, Third Assistant Engineer; James McB. Stembel, Master's Mate; Philip Shell, Master's Mate; John R. Hall, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Thomas B. Gregory, Carpenter; Jacob Vitinger, Armorer. Gun-boat Conestoga. S. L. Phelps, U. S. N., Lieutenant Commanding; John A. Duble. First Master; Charles P. Noble, Second Master; Benjamin Sebastian, Third Master; Richard H. Cutter, Fourth Master; Aaron M. Jordan. Pilot; William Attenborough, Pilot
o take such a force as he could raise and proceed to a point on the Osage, Bates County, Mo., and there break up a gang of bushwhackers. We marched from Fort Lincoln with seventy men of the battalion raised by himself, under Capt. Pierson, (formerly of the First Iowa,) and Lieut. Thrasher, (formerly of the Third Kansas,) and one hundred and seventy men from Col. Williams's battalion, under the command of Capt. R. G. Ward, company B; Adjutant R. J. Hinton, Capt. A. G. Crew, company A, and J. Armstrong, company H, (the latter was formerly in company B, Third Kansas,) and Lieuts. Dickerson, company C, Huddleton, company E, Gardner, company F, and Minor, company D. This made in all two hundred and forty men, with the addition of half a dozen white scouts. The men were armed with the Prussian and Austrian rifled muskets, the former of which is an excellent weapon, and the latter a poor one, from constant liability to get out of order. On the twenty-sixth the command marched twenty mil
ing up from the capital of Mississippi, on the fifth, stopped him, and ordered that Coldwater should be again occupied. Since then Lovell has been there with his division; and also Tilghman, with a division composed chiefly of exchanged prisoners from Island No.10 and Donelson. Attached to this force are six four-gun batteries. Price lay with twelve thousand men seven miles below Holly Springs, on the Salem road, while twenty-two miles further south, at Abbeysville, were some thirteen thousand militia, or conscripts. This constitutes all the rebel force in this vicinity at the date of this letter, though others may be crossing at Vicksburgh, thanks to those who permit crossing to be done at that point. Three weeks ago Gen. Armstrong left Holly Springs with seven thousand men on his way to Port Hudson, a point above Baton Rouge, which is being strongly fortified. He has since resigned. Van Dorn is now at Holly Springs under arrest, and is succeeded, as you know, by Pemberton.
particularly to the cool and efficient manner in which I was seconded by Lieutenant Commander Thomas H. Eastman, the executive officer of the ship. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, William E. Leroy, Commander. Acting Assistant Surgeon Mason of the Mercedita makes the following report of the killed and wounded on board that vessel: Killed — Jacob Atmee, gunner, by a shell; James Gale, second-class fireman, scalded to death. Wounded — Wm. Eastwood, slightly ; James Armstrong, slightly ; John Riley, mortally ; Jas. Gallagher, mortally — the two latter have since died. The following is a report of the killed and wounded on the Keystone State: Killed — Jacob H. Gotwold, Surgeon, scalded to death ; Samuel W. Bayle, Steward, scalded to death ; James Bau, fireman, scalded to death; George A. Nelson, fireman, scalded to death; Edward Livermore, Orderly Sergeant, scalded to death; Wm. A. Grau, Corporal, scalded to death; Thomas Riley, marine, scalded to deat
sides about ten minutes. A piece of artillery was now discovered in position to shell our camp, and rebel cavalry were moving down the hills, and in large bodies rapidly approaching us from all directions. A flag of truce was sent out from our lines, the firing ceased, and our forces were surrendered. Our loss was three wounded in the engagement. The enemy, to my knowledge, had one killed and five wounded. The enemy's force consisted of three brigades, commanded by Generals Forrest, Armstrong, and Stearns, and a battalion of Independent Scouts, under the command of Major Sanders, numbering in all not less than five thousand men. An attempt was made to give notice of the attack at Franklin or Nashville, but the wires had been cut. Colonel Bloodgood had no reasons to expect assistance from either point, and he had nothing to do with the surrender at the bridge, though your correspondent says he surrendered that post without firing a gun. That point was subsequently surrendered
company F, clung to them as manfully, however, as they had borne them during the fight. One of the rebels who had seized them was killed, another captured, and the rest driven back. The rebels advanced in force to the edge of the woods, and so closely upon the flank of the regiment that the retreat of some upon its right was intercepted by their advancing ranks, and they escaped capture by the confusion into which the rebels were thrown from the active fire of the batteries. To Lieut.-Col. Armstrong, Major Anthony, who I regret to say was seriously wounded, and Adjutant Green, I must again tender my thanks for valuable assistance in the field. They performed their several duties with the utmost coolness and determination, evincing a steadiness of purpose worthy of emulation. The regiment sustained a loss of four (4) killed, thirty-one (31) wounded, and six (6) missing, enlisted men, and one officer, Major Anthony, seriously wounded. I am, Captain, very respectfully your obe
t-Colonel Davis, of the same regiment. At ten A. M., on the seventh, I found safety and rest under our brave old flag, within our lines at Gloucester Point. The raid and march about the entire rebel army, a march of nearly two hundred miles, has been made in less than five days, with a loss of one officer and thirty-seven men, having captured and paroled upward of eight hundred men. I take great pleasure in bringing to your notice the officers of my staff, Captain P. Owen Jones, Captain Armstrong, and Captain McIrvin, Doctor Hackley and Lieutenant Estis, especially the latter, who volunteered to carry a despatch to Major-General Hooker. He failed in the attempt, but with his escort of ten men he captured and paroled one major, two captains, a lieutenant, and fifteen men. He was afterward himself captured, with his escort, and was afterward recaptured by our own forces. He arrived this morning. I cannot praise too highly the bravery, fortitude, and untiring energy displayed t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General S. McGowan of battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
lled over. It is believed that we captured as many prisoners as we lost. Among the casualties are Lieutenant-Colonel W. P. Shooter and Lieutenant E. C. Shooter, Lieutenant J. B. Blackman and Lieutenant J. R. Faulkenburg, of the Twelfth; Colonel B. T. Brockman and Captain J. R. Brockman, of the Thirteenth; Lieutenant A. M. Scarborough and Lieutenant H. R. Hunter, of the Fourteenth, and Captain G. W. Fullerton, of the Rifles, killed; Colonel C. W. McCreary, Lieutenant A. F. Miller, Lieutenant James Armstrong, Captain W. A. Kelly and Lieutenant W. R. Tharin, of the First; Lieutenant W. B. White and Captain Stover, of the Twelfth; Captain J. Y. McFall and Lieutenant W. J. Rook, of the Thirteenth; Captain G. W. Culbertson, Lieutenant J. M. Miller, Lieutenant E. Brown, Captain E. Cowan and Captain J. M. McCarly, of the Fourteenth; Captain L. Rogers, Captain R. S. Cheshire, Lieutenant L. T. Reeder, Lieutenant A. Sinclair and Lieutenant-Colonel G. McD. Miller, of the Rifles, wounded. In al
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wilderness. (search)
lled over. It is believed that we captured as many prisoners as we lost. Among the casualties are Lieutenant-Colonel W. P. Shooter and Lieutenant E. C. Shooter, Lieutenant J. B. Blackman and Lieutenant J. R. Faulkenburg, of the Twelfth; Colonel B. T. Brockman and Captain J. R. Brockman, of the Thirteenth; Lieutenant A. M. Scarborough and Lieutenant H. R. Hunter, of the Fourteenth, and Captain G. W. Fullerton, of the Rifles, killed; Colonel C. W. McCreary, Lieutenant A. F. Miller, Lieutenant James Armstrong, Captain W. A. Kelly and Lieutenant W. R. Tharin, of the First; Lieutenant W. B. White and Captain Stover, of the Twelfth; Captain J. Y. McFall and Lieutenant W. J. Rook, of the Thirteenth; Captain G. W. Culbertson, Lieutenant J. M. Miller, Lieutenant E. Brown, Captain E. Cowan and Captain J. M. McCarly, of the Fourteenth; Captain L. Rogers, Captain R. S. Cheshire, Lieutenant L. T. Reeder, Lieutenant A. Sinclair and Lieutenant-Colonel G. McD. Miller, of the Rifles, wounded. In al
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