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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Robert Armstrong or search for Robert Armstrong in all documents.

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m of the gorge, near the ford, and remained for fifteen minutes, until a general retreat was ordered. The regiment then passed on to the top of the hill, where it was joined by the remainder of the brigade, and formed into column. Large bodies of stragglers were passing along the road, and it was found impossible to retain the order, which otherwise would have been preserved. Yet the brigade succeeded in retiring in comparatively good condition, with Arnold's battery of artillery and Capt. Armstrong's company of dragoons bringing up the rear. The retreat continued thus until the column was about emerging from the woods and entering upon the Warrenton turnpike, when the artillery and cavalry went to the front, and the enemy opened fire upon the retreating mass of men. Upon the bridge crossing Cub Run a shot took effect upon the horses of a team that was crossing. The wagon was overturned directly in the centre of the bridge, and the passage was completely obstructed. The enemy co
over 50,000, but 35,000 will probably cover the entire force in action at the Stone Bridge. Of the pursuit, already the particulars are known. Suffice it to say, we followed them on the Leesburg road and on the Centreville road as far as Centreville and Fairfax. The poor wretches dropped their guns, their knapsacks, their blankets, and every thing they had — they fell on their knees and prayed for mercy. They received it — Southerners have no animosity against a defeated enemy. We have captured 900 prisoners, and they will be treated with kindness. We have also captured 67 pieces of cannon, among them numerous fine pieces, Armstrong guns, and rifled cannon, hundreds of wagons, loads of provisions, and ammunition. The credit is accorded them: they fought well and long, but their cause was bad — they were on soil not their own, and they met their equals, who were fighting in defence of their homes, their liberty, and their honor.--Richmond Dispatch, and Baltimore Sun, Aug
found himself surrounded by at times during the day. The non-commissioned officers and men, to a man, behaved admirably, but I am constrained to mention Sergeants Robert Armstrong and Gustave Dey, and Corporals Albert Watchman and Lorenzo T. Immell, who were on several occasions during the day greatly exposed and severely tried, ad 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride's division (605 men) lost 22 killed, 67 severely wounded, and 57 slightly wounded. Col. Foster and Capts. Nichols, Dougherty, Armstrong, and Mings were wounded while gallantly leading their respective commands. Gen. Parson's brigade, 256 infantry and artillery, under command respectively of Codebted for the coolness and rapidity with which they carried orders about the field, and would call particular attention to my volunteer aids, Capt. Bledsoe, Messrs. Armstrong, Ben Johnston, (whose horse was killed under him,) Hamilton Pike, and Major King. To Major Montgomery, quartermaster, I am also indebted for much service as
nder the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride's division (605 men) lost 22 killed, 67 severely wounded, and 57 slightly wounded. Col. Foster and Capts. Nichols, Dougherty, Armstrong, and Mings were wounded while gallantly leading their respective commands. Gen. Parson's brigade, 256 infantry and artillery, under command respectively of Col. Kelly and Capt. Guibor, and 406 cavalry, Col. Brown, lost — the artillery three nt to the reports of the different commanders. To my personal staff I am much indebted for the coolness and rapidity with which they carried orders about the field, and would call particular attention to my volunteer aids, Capt. Bledsoe, Messrs. Armstrong, Ben Johnston, (whose horse was killed under him,) Hamilton Pike, and Major King. To Major Montgomery, quartermaster, I am also indebted for much service as an aid during the battle; he was of much use to me. To Col. McIntosh, at one time