Your search returned 319 results in 126 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
with complacency, or preferred over another, by slaveholders or their apologists? Are not all their names cast out as evil? Are they not all branded as fanatics, disorganizers and madmen? Has not one of them (Dr. Cox) had his dwelling and meeting-house rudely Lib. 4.114. and riotously assaulted, and even been hunted in the streets of New York? Has not another (Beriah Green) been burnt in Lib. 4.23. effigy in the city of Utica? (To say nothing of the sufferings and persecutions of Arthur and Lewis Tappan, and other individuals.) Why are they thus maltreated and calumniated? Certainly, not for the phraseology which they use, but for the principles which they adopt. Are they not all tauntingly stigmatized as Garrison-men ? As soon as any man becomes hostile to colonization, and friendly to abolition, is he not at once recognized and stamped by the enemy as a Garrisonite? Then how can it be averred that it is my language that gives offence, seeing that it is only my principle
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
bury, of New Hampshire, as the supposed author of a certain incendiary publication called Human Rights. The writer hints at offering rewards for the abduction of the leading men who are thirsting for our blood—your Tappans, Garrisons, and Woodburys—and thinks the Yankees would readily turn to vending more profitable notions than wooden nutmegs. To the same, September 12: Rumor is very busy in disposing of the persons of Ms. to G. W. Benson. abolitionists. One day, she sends Arthur and Lewis Tappan across the Atlantic as fast as the winds and waves can carry them. On the next, she puts you into Providence jail, at the suggestion of your friends, for safe keeping from your enemies. Thompson she transports to Pittsburgh; and she says I am here because I dare not go back to Boston. It is thus we relieve the tediousness and monotony of those who have nothing to do but to scandalize and gossip. I have just received a letter from Brother May, written September 2, 18
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 7: romance, poetry, and history (search)
ultery, although suggestively enough present in one of the finest symbolical titles ever devised by a romancer, does not once occur in the book. The sins dealt with are hypocrisy and revenge. Arthur Dimmesdale, Hester Prynne, and Roger Chillingworth are developing, suffering, living creatures, caught inextricably in the toils of a moral situation. By an incomparable succession of pictures Hawthorne exhibits the travail of their souls. In the greatest scene of all, that between Hester and Arthur in the forest, the Puritan framework of the story gives way beneath the weight of human passion, and we seem on the verge of another and perhaps larger solution than was actually worked out by the logic of succeeding events. But though the book has been called Christless, prayerless, hopeless, no mature person ever reads it without a deepened sense of the impotence of all mechanistic theories of sin, and a new vision of the intense reality of spiritual things. The law we broke, in Dimmesd
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Lydia H. Sigourney. (search)
f the State, and her means, and the culture of her husband, conspired to encourage her in the literary field in which she was now winning such a triumph. Besides the volume printed in 1815, in 1816 she had published her Life and writings of Nancy Maria Hyde, an interesting tribute to the memory of her most intimate friend and fellow-teacher; and during the year of her marriage appeared, also, The square table, a pamphlet designed as a corrective of what were deemed the harmful tendencies of Arthur's round table, which was then exciting considerable attention in the community. From this date to that of her death our record must be that of an earnest woman, filling up every hour of her day with its allotted duty, cheerfully and nobly done. Few women have been so diligent workers, few have maintained such fervency of spirit, and few have, in all their working, no faithfully served the Lord. Her position, that of second wife and step-mother, has not always been found an easy one to
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
el of the regiment, was the son of Mr. Garrison's warm friends, Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Shaw, of Staten Island, and among the subordinate officers were several young men of antislavery birth and training, who frequently visited his house and were intimate with his children. The original abolitionists did not lack representatives in the army and navy forces for the suppression of slavery and the rebellion. Among those whose sons, grandsons, or sons-in-law were thus enrolled could be named Arthur and Lewis Tappan, Mr. Garrison, James G. Birney, William Jay, Gerrit Smith, Joshua Leavitt, Abraham L. Cox, John Rankin of Ohio, Samuel Fessenden, Francis G. Shaw, Samuel May, Jr., Henry I. Bowditch, James Forten, Robert Purvis, Frederick Douglass, S. S. Jocelyn, Charles Follen, William H. Burleigh, Amasa Walker, and others. Henry Wilson, Joshua R. Giddings, William Slade, and Henry Ward Beecher contributed in like manner to the struggle (Lib. 35: 139). His heart was deeply stirred as he c
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
moment that he enters the holy <*>oom of history he becomes, as Mark Twain became when he went to Europe, the representative of democratic America, preaching the gospel of commonsense and practical improvement and liberty and equality and free thought inherited from Franklin, Paine, Jefferson, and Ingersoll. Those to whom Malory's romance is a sacred book may fairly complain that the exhibition of the Arthurian realm is a brutal and libellous travesty, attributing to the legendary period of Arthur horrors which belong to medieval Spain and Italy. Mark Twain admits the charge. He takes his horrors where he finds then. His wide-sweeping satirical purpose requires a comprehensive display of human ignorance, folly, and iniquity. He must vent the flame of indignation which swept through him whenever he fixed his attention on human history—indignation against removable dirt, ignorance, injustice, and cruelty. As a radical American, he ascribed a great share of these evils to monarchy,
Freeman, Miss Ella 77 Munroe Street Freeman, Miss Mary77 Munroe Street Fuller, Mrs. S. W. 151 Walnut Street Furlong, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur42 Greenville Street Galletly, Mrs. Lizzie Giles24 Webster Street Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. G. A.8 Hudson StrMrs. Arthur42 Greenville Street Galletly, Mrs. Lizzie Giles24 Webster Street Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. G. A.8 Hudson Street Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. M. E.11 Spring-hill Terrace Gifford, Mr. and Mrs. R. Y.49 Boston Street Giles, Mr. and Mrs. C. E.24 Webster Street Giles, Mr. and Mrs. C. F.35 Boston Street Giles, Mr. and Mrs. Everett 65 Glen Street Gladwell, Mr. andn, George 36 Everett Avenue Horton, Miss Adeline78 Pearl Street Houghton, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar W.20 Gilman Terrace Howe, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B.24 Pleasant Avenue Jacobs, Mrs. Beulah 9 Gilman Street Jerauld, Mrs. H. D.14 Chester Avenue Jones, MrMrs. Arthur B.24 Pleasant Avenue Jacobs, Mrs. Beulah 9 Gilman Street Jerauld, Mrs. H. D.14 Chester Avenue Jones, Mrs. Chester U.55 Oliver Street Keene, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney56 Chauncey Avenue Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. James E.37 Montrose Street Kimpton, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph40 Gilman Street Kirkpatrick, Charles A. Franklin, N. H. Knapp, Mrs. O. S. 28 School Street
, Myra 172 Broadway Atwood, Mrs. Edith206 Pearl Street Atwood Marguerite206 Pearl Street Atwood, Mildred 46 Springfield Street Atwood, Renah46 Springfield Street Baker, Herbert 147 Cross Street Baldwin, Warren 82 Mt. Vernon Street Baldwin, Arthur82 Mt. Vernon Street Barrett, Mrs.19 Melvin Street Barrett, Alice19 Melvin Street Benner, Ruphena12 Munroe Street Bishop, William5 Pearl Street Bolton, William10 Crescent Street Bolton, Harry10 Crescent Street Bolton, Marion10 Crescent Stre Dartmouth Street Hills, Maud.20 Tufts Street Holmes, Edna 214 Broadway Holmes, Ruth22 Fountain Avenue Hooper, Leona41 Munroe Street Horton, George36 Everett Avenue Horton, Bessie22 Everett Avenue Horton, Chester 22 Everett Avenue Horton, Arthur22 Everett Avenue Houghton, George 20 Gilman Terrace Humiston, Mrs. F. R.43 Fairmount Avenue Humiston, Doris43 Fairmount Avenue Hutchins, Fred19-A Morton Street Jacobs, Helen59 Gilman Street Jacobs, Leon 59 Gilman Street Jacobs, Cyril59 Gi
tle Street to Fresh Pond. These and other parcels he sold in 1639 to Simon Crosby, and removed to Salisbury. He died 1663, leaving 8 children. Farmer. Cole, Arthur, m. Lydia Barrett, 27 Nov. 1673, and had Arthur, b. 20 Dec. 1674, d. 30 Oct. 1702; Daniel, b. 7 Mar. 1675-6. Arthur the f. d. 4 Sept. 1676. 2. Jacob Cole (or Arthur, b. 20 Dec. 1674, d. 30 Oct. 1702; Daniel, b. 7 Mar. 1675-6. Arthur the f. d. 4 Sept. 1676. 2. Jacob Cole (or Coale), and others, single men and inmates in this town, were required by the Selectmen, Feb. 12, 1665-6, to connect themselves with some family. The next month, Jacob Coale submitted himself to the family government of Francis Whitmore, who engaged to respond his rates and orderly carriage, during his abode there. Town Rec. n Aegur, Egar, and Eger), m. Ruth Hill in Malden, 1659, and was here between 1672 and 1682. His w. Ruth d. 16 Jan. 1679-80, and he m. Hester Cole (Lydia, wid. of Arthur?) 13 Ap. 1680. His children, born here, were Zerubbabel, b. 8 June 1672; Martha, b. 26 Nov. 1674; Ruth, b. 1 Feb. 1677; Sarah, b. 25 June 1679; Margaret, b. 25 M
er house with three acres, extending from Garden Street to the way leading from Brattle Street to Fresh Pond. These and other parcels he sold in 1639 to Simon Crosby, and removed to Salisbury. He died 1663, leaving 8 children. Farmer. Cole, Arthur, m. Lydia Barrett, 27 Nov. 1673, and had Arthur, b. 20 Dec. 1674, d. 30 Oct. 1702; Daniel, b. 7 Mar. 1675-6. Arthur the f. d. 4 Sept. 1676. 2. Jacob Cole (or Coale), and others, single men and inmates in this town, were required by the SelectArthur, b. 20 Dec. 1674, d. 30 Oct. 1702; Daniel, b. 7 Mar. 1675-6. Arthur the f. d. 4 Sept. 1676. 2. Jacob Cole (or Coale), and others, single men and inmates in this town, were required by the Selectmen, Feb. 12, 1665-6, to connect themselves with some family. The next month, Jacob Coale submitted himself to the family government of Francis Whitmore, who engaged to respond his rates and orderly carriage, during his abode there. Town Rec. Mary, who m. Samuel Frost 12 Oct. 1663, may have been sister to Arthur Cole, Sen. Sarah, m. Philemon Hastings, 19 Mar. 1766. Collins, Edward, was a large land-holder in Camb. as early as 1636, and during his sojourn here was one of the most promine
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...