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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
onfederates. For on the 9th Sill and Dumont were marching to rejoin the main body, and in another day Buell could have had his entire 58,000--minus the loss sustained in the battle — well in hand. After Perryville, Morgan was ordered to rejoin the army, when everything was concentrated at Harrodsburg, as if for a battle which General Bragg could have won but never meant to fight. When the army, leaving Harrodsburg, without battle, began its retreat to Tennessee, Morgan, assisted by Col. Henry Ashby with a small brigade of cavalry, was employed in covering its rear. This rear-guard was engaged very arduously, and almost constantly, in contact with Buell's advance regiments until the 17th. At that date Morgan received permission to retrace his march, capture Lexington, which was, of course, in the hands of the enemy, and then move southward, directly across Buell's rear, doing the latter all possible damage. Marching rapidly for twenty-four hours, he reached Lexington at dawn of
nd. Company D, Capt. Griswold.--Two men accidentally wounded — names not reported. Company E, Capt. C. K. Sherman. --Killed--Corporal Theodore Morris. Wounded — Jas. E. Marrow, leg, which has been amputated; Privates P. K. Reiley., in thigh and calf of leg, severely; Thomas Collins, shoulder, severely; C. M. Herring, slightly, by fragment of a shell. Company G, Captain Wm. H. Gordon.--Killed.-- Lieut. H. H. Miles; Privates, J. Scott Mallory, S. S. Wilkinson. Wounded--Privates, Henry Ashby, left foot, slightly; G. F. Knanff, left hand, slightly; Jas. A. Royster, right arm, slightly; Robt. Ashby, blow on cheek; Wm. L. Ware, ankle, slightly. Company H. Captain F. J. Boggs.--Killed--Private Milton A. Barnes. Wounded--Sergeant James L. Bray, hand, slightly; John H. Morgan, foot, slightly; John H. Hartman, hand, slightly. Company I, Captain W. O. Taylor.--No one injured in this Company. Company K, Captain P. Miller.--Killed--Private Wolfgang Deacomb. Wounde
arm: recovered. James Driscoll, through body: died All on the 18th. Jno. Cavenang in the hand, on the 21st. Company B.--Capt. Lee, mortally wounded Lieut. Wirt Harrison, wounded in foot; recovered. Sergeant Wm. J. Lumpkin, wounded in hand: recovered. Joseph Allen, killed. Fred. Lutz wounded in head; recovered. Nat. Kesler, wounded in breast; recovered. All on the 18th. Company G.--Lieut. H. H. Miles, mortally wounded. Southey Wilkerson, killed. J. Scott Mallory, killed. Henry Ashby, wounded in foot; recovered. George Knauff, wounded in hand; recovered. James A. Royester wounded in arm; recovered. Wm. S. ware, wounded in foot. All on 18th. Company E.--S. Morris, killed. James E. Marron, killed.--Collins, wounded. All on 18th. Company K.--Wolfgang Discout, killed. Wm. E. Cree, wounded; recovered. Fred. Gutider, wounded; recovered. Henry Duebel. wounded. recovered. All on 18th. Phil. C. Degechart, wounded, on the 21st. Company H--Milton H. Barne
otected state, we have reason to fear they will take advantage of it to supply themselves with food, of which they are said to be very much in need. We are in daily anticipation of hearing of a fight at Manassas, or somewhere in that direction, but we feel no fear of the result, having in the past a sufficient guarantee of the manner in which our soldiers will perform their duty. The greater part of Banks's army is said to have moved up to Williamsport, and all the military under Col. Ashby's command have gone up to Berkeley county. A good deal of firing was heard in that direction yesterday morning, but we have received no information in regard to it. One more item of news which we have heard, may, perhaps, be interesting to the public; it is, that the arch-traitor, Daniel it Strother, has been seen in Frederick City, flourishing quite extensively under the title of Colonel, no doubt conferred upon him as a rewarn for his treachery to his native State. Virginia
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], A "Battle-Flag" for the Powhatan Troop. (search)
eported to be from four to six thousand strong some miles beyond Somerset On Sunday last there was a skirmish between our pickets and the pickets of the Lincolnites at Somerset, the result of which was that thirteen Lincolnites were killed and fourteen taken prisoners. On our side no casualties occurred. except one man wounded and a horse killed. Among the Lincolnites killed was one Lieutenant. The enemy's pickets, both killed and wounded, all belonged to the 17th Ohio regiment. Capt. Henry Ashby was in the skirmish, and did gallant service. Private Robert Crozier took a gray-headed Ohioan prisoner, who complains that after he was disarmed he was called an abolitionist, a charge which he indignantly repudiates. The army under Gen. Zollicoffer are reported to have entire confidence in him, and are eager to be led against the invaders. The health of his command is excellent, and his forces well provided for. A company of Lincolnite cavalry, on picket at Fishing Creek, wer
A streets difficulty in Knoxville --The of the 4th inst., A difficulty, between Capt. Henry Ashby and a party of three men belonging to Col. London's regiment, occurred in the vicinity of the Lamar Honan in our city on yesterday evening, in the serious if not mortal wounding of a man by the name of Shailsnon, of Col. Looney's regiment. Captain Ashby was also slightly wounded in the calf of the leg by an accidental discharge of his own pistol. A streets difficulty in Knoxville --The of the 4th inst., A difficulty, between Capt. Henry Ashby and a party of three men belonging to Col. London's regiment, occurred in the vicinity of the Lamar Honan in our city on yesterday evening, in the serious if not mortal wounding of a man by the name of Shailsnon, of Col. Looney's regiment. Captain Ashby was also slightly wounded in the calf of the leg by an accidental discharge of his own pistol.
eived at Knoxville we gather the following facts about the engagement: On the 9th inst the enemy advanced against Monticello with two regiments of cavalry, one of mounted infantry, and four pieces of artillery. Gen. Pegram retired with a portion of his command six miles south of the town, checking the enemy from point to point. After waiting two hours for the attack General Pegram turned upon the enemy and pursued him until dark. His most obstinate stand was in a dense forest, two miles south of Cumberland river, through which, although the enemy had the advantage in position and numbers, Gen. Pegram slowly and steadily drove him. The distinguished gallantry of officers and men is highly commended. Our loss was five killed and thirty wounded. The enemy's loss was nine killed, ten mortally wounded, and twenty-six slightly, according to a Federal Surgeon's report; but believed to be larger Col. Henry Ashby, of the 2d Tennessee cavalry, was painfully wounded in the knee.