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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
ring to report to him. These, together with Turner Ashby's cavalry, gave him a force of about ten thidge through Brown's and Swift Run Gaps. Only Ashby remained behind with about one thousand cavalrtecting the flanks of the retreating army from Ashby's pursuing cavalry, led by Captain Sheetz. Jaurnpike he had marched his little army, except Ashby's cavalry, which, under an intrepid leader, Can to cut off Jackson's retreat up the valley. Ashby's men were still in his front toward McDowell,same slip, and as a postscript, he wrote, Poor Ashby is dead. He fell gloriously. By Major Jed.to speak first. He referred very feelingly to Ashby's death, and spoke of it as an irreparable lost Harrisonburg, June 6, 1862, and the death of Ashby. In the affair of the rear-guard at Harrisoy and color guard, killed the horses of General Turner Ashby and Colonel Johnson, and in a second afh sides suffered severely, driving the enemy. Ashby was directing when he fell not thirty yards fr[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on the battle of McDowell. (search)
of those of my immediate command who were least fatigued. The whole number engaged was 2600; of these we had just ten per cent. killed and wounded. We remained at McDowell, at the foot of the mountain, the point from which our troops moved to the attack through that night, buried our dead, sent off the wounded and all stores, and withdrew in good order toward Franklin in the early morning. Our march back to Franklin, which occupied three days, was orderly and was not seriously molested by Ashby's cavalry or any force of the rebels in pursuit. At Franklin we kept Jackson with his whole force at bay with our still much inferior numbers, until General Fremont arrived there on the 13th of May. With the troops I had left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arrived to take command more than 6500 men. On the 8th of May, Fremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., I. (search)
of those of my immediate command who were least fatigued. The whole number engaged was 2600; of these we had just ten per cent. killed and wounded. We remained at McDowell, at the foot of the mountain, the point from which our troops moved to the attack through that night, buried our dead, sent off the wounded and all stores, and withdrew in good order toward Franklin in the early morning. Our march back to Franklin, which occupied three days, was orderly and was not seriously molested by Ashby's cavalry or any force of the rebels in pursuit. At Franklin we kept Jackson with his whole force at bay with our still much inferior numbers, until General Fremont arrived there on the 13th of May. With the troops I had left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arrived to take command more than 6500 men. On the 8th of May, Fremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
Taliaferro; 37th Va., Lieut.-Col. R. P. Carson; Va. Battery (Danville Art'y), Lieut. A. C. Lanier. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 76; m, 71=162. Cavalry, 7th Va., Col. Turner Ashby; Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew. Cavalry loss: k, 1; w, 17 =18. Total loss (March 22d and 23d): killed, 80; wounded, 375; missing, 263 = 718. General Ja. Battery. Capt. William H. Rice. Artillery loss: Cross Keys, k, 8; w, 20; in, 8==36. cavalry, Col. Thomas S. Flournoy, Brig.-Gen. George H. Steuart, Brig.-Gen. Turner Ashby (k), Col. Thomas T. Munford: 2d Va., Lieut-Col. James W. Watts; Col. Thomas T. Munford; 6th Va., Col. Thomas S. Flournoy; 7th Va., Col. Turner Ashby (promCol. Turner Ashby (promoted Brig.-Gen. May 23d); Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew. Cavalry loss: Front Royal and Winchester (partial report), k, 11; w, 15 == 26. (Other casualties in the cavalry during the campaign are not specifically stated.) General Jackson reported his losses at Front Royal, Winchester, etc., from May 23d to 31st, as 68 killed, 329
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate Army. (search)
Taliaferro; 37th Va., Lieut.-Col. R. P. Carson; Va. Battery (Danville Art'y), Lieut. A. C. Lanier. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 76; m, 71=162. Cavalry, 7th Va., Col. Turner Ashby; Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew. Cavalry loss: k, 1; w, 17 =18. Total loss (March 22d and 23d): killed, 80; wounded, 375; missing, 263 = 718. General Ja. Battery. Capt. William H. Rice. Artillery loss: Cross Keys, k, 8; w, 20; in, 8==36. cavalry, Col. Thomas S. Flournoy, Brig.-Gen. George H. Steuart, Brig.-Gen. Turner Ashby (k), Col. Thomas T. Munford: 2d Va., Lieut-Col. James W. Watts; Col. Thomas T. Munford; 6th Va., Col. Thomas S. Flournoy; 7th Va., Col. Turner Ashby (promCol. Turner Ashby (promoted Brig.-Gen. May 23d); Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew. Cavalry loss: Front Royal and Winchester (partial report), k, 11; w, 15 == 26. (Other casualties in the cavalry during the campaign are not specifically stated.) General Jackson reported his losses at Front Royal, Winchester, etc., from May 23d to 31st, as 68 killed, 329
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Jackson at Kernstown. (search)
ackson had fled with his army from the valley, leaving only a small force under Ashby for observation, and that he had driven this force beyond the Shenandoah at Mou P. M., March 22d, Jackson announced his appearance in our front by the guns of Ashby's artillery. Ashby, advancing from the direction of Strasburg, forced our outpAshby, advancing from the direction of Strasburg, forced our outposts back upon their reserves, and attacked them with his cavalry. At the sound of the first gun, General Shields hurried to the front with reenforcements, returnede enemy, as the force in my front was nothing more than an observation force of Ashby's cavalry. At daylight, on the 23d, my command was moving; so was the enemy' him to send me reenforcements. I was satisfied that not only was the force of Ashby present, but the entire army of Stonewall Jackson, with that general in command field on account of wounds received in the engagement of the 22d of March with Ashby's cavalry in front of Winchester, now arrived, and in General orders, no. 28, d