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equipage and baggage, which was burned by the rebels. By this time we had learned from our scouts and from other sources that we were about to be attacked by the combined forces of Johnson and Jackson, numbering some fifteen thousand men, with Ashby's cavalry, and a good supply of artillery. Our forces that were advanced toward the Shenandoah, were immediately ordered to fall back to McDowell. As we came up Shaw's Ridge, just this side of the Shenandoah, we could see the rebels swarming ovn the day, our command thought it prudent to halt and go into camp for the night. At sunrise the next morning we were again on the line of march in pursuit of the enemy. When we arrived at Bull Pasture Mountain we ascended to its summit, when Ashby's scouts reported that the Yankees had placed four pieces of artillery on the road leading into McDowell, on the west side of the mountain, where the road passes through a narrow gorge. The heights commanding Monterey were also in possession of
inding storm, and over roads which were rivers of mire, a quick challenge came out of the darkness, and was answered with a demand for the countersign. If you are Ashby's cavalry, replied the rebel leader, it is all right, come on. Recognizing Ashby's voice, Colonel Figyelmesi did come on, and answered with instant order to chaAshby's voice, Colonel Figyelmesi did come on, and answered with instant order to charge. One officer and fifteen men followed him, and with this handful he rode straight into the famous rebel cavalry, and scattered it with the shock. Ashby gave the order to retreat at the first moment, yet in the brief contest three or four rebels were killed. It was impossible in the darkness and tremendous storm of that nigAshby gave the order to retreat at the first moment, yet in the brief contest three or four rebels were killed. It was impossible in the darkness and tremendous storm of that night to send forward the main column. General Fremont, therefore, encamped his troops where his lines had been formed, and at six next morning advanced again upon Strasburgh. A mile from camp a courier met him with the news that the head of McDowell's column was approaching the train from the other side. The General instantly put
une 7, 1862, 9 o'clock P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: The attack upon the enemy's rear of yesterday, precipitated his retreat. Their loss in killed and wounded was very severe. Their retreat is almost by an impassable road, along which many wagons were left in the woods, and wagon-loads of blankets, clothing, and other equipments are piled up in all directions. During the evening many of the rebels were killed by shells from a battery of General Stahl's brigade. General Ashby, who covered the retreat with his whole cavalry force and three regiments of infantry, and who exhibited admirable skill and audacity, was among the killed. General Milroy made a reconnoissance, to-day, about seven miles on the Port Republic road, and discovered a portion of the enemy's forces encamped in the timber. J. C. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. New-York Tribune account. Fremont's headquarters, Harrisonburgh, Va., June 7, 1862. The march from Newmarket, yester
An hour later, and there was an ominous roar behind. The enemy was thundering on our rear. I know that the moment was painful to many, but no soldier's heart seemed to shrink from the desperate shock. Back and forth dashed hot riders. Messengers here, orders there, composure and decision where it should be, with determination to wrest triumph from the jaws of disaster. As yet every thing had prospered, and at noon a brighter ray flashed athwart our dreary horizon. Averill — our dashing Ashby --had moved with the vanguard, met eight companies of rebel cavalry, charged them, routed them, pursued them miles beyond our reach, and returned in triumph with sixty prisoners and horses, leaving nine dead foes on the field. He explained it modestly, but I saw old generals thank him for the gallant exploit — not the first of his youthful career. Gen. Keyes had sent a section of artillery with the vanguard, Averill's cavalry escorting it. The rebels charged at the guns, not perceiving our
emy only for a moment, and then fell back in good order. The moment was critical. While endeavoring to rally my men again, I sent orders to the battery of the Second brigade, which I had placed in position in the rear of my left wing, to open fire upon the enemy, who threatened to come out of the woods. This was done with very good effect, and the enemy was brought to a stand, almost instantaneously. Meanwhile I succeeded in forming the Fifty-fourth New-York again, whose commander, Lieut.-Col. Ashby, displayed much courage and determination, and placed it en echelon behind the Twenty-ninth New-York, which advanced in splendid style upon the enemy in our centre. My extreme right, under Col. Schimmelfennig, had stood firm, with the exception of the Eighth Virginia, while the extreme left, under Colonel Krzyzanowski, had contested every inch of ground against the heavy pressure of a greatly superior force. The conduct of the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, which displayed the greatest
emy only for a moment, and then fell back in good order. The moment was critical. While endeavoring to rally my men again, I sent orders to the battery of the Second brigade, which I had placed in position in the rear of my left wing, to open fire upon the enemy, who threatened to come out of the woods. This was done with very good effect, and the enemy was brought to a stand, almost instantaneously. Meanwhile I succeeded in forming the Fifty-fourth New-York again, whose commander, Lieut.-Col. Ashby, displayed much courage and determination, and placed it en echelon behind the Twenty-ninth New-York, which advanced in splendid style upon the enemy in our centre. My extreme right, under Col. Schimmelfennig, had stood firm, with the exception of the Eighth Virginia, while the extreme left, under Colonel Krzyzanowski, had contested every inch of ground against the heavy pressure of a greatly superior force. The conduct of the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, which displayed the greatest
cars have not yet commenced running on the Central Railroad, and this affair will be likely to hinder the repair of the road to a great extent. A Richmond paper, found in the rebel camp, stated that Gen. Stuart was building a bridge across the North Anna River, over which he intended, with two thousand men, to commit depredations in this direction. Col. Kilpatrick left word for Stuart that he need take no more trouble about the bridge, as we should give them all they could attend to on their own side. This dash cannot fail to impress the rebels with the fact that the department of the Rappahannock is about to prove rather a troublesome neighbor, and unless Stuart's men exercise more courage their laurels will very soon have faded. A portion of Ashby's old command was also in the fight, as we are informed by prisoners, and when the rebel authorities learn the inferiority of our force, they may possibly reflect upon the probability of a Yankee being equal to at least one rebel.
ve an engagement as at first supposed; neither has there been the cutting to pieces of this regiment and that battalion, as stated. The fight was a gallant one while it lasted, which, according to the general's despatch, was about four hours. The enemy were getting bold in the vicinity of our forces, and was gradually extending his lines and committing depredations upon the property of private citizens; so Gen. Smith ordered an attack, to put a check upon his movements. The skirmish of Colonel Ashby's cavalry, some days ago, was the forerunner of a movement on him, and shout after shout went up from the ranks of men almost disheartened that our government would not let them have a brush. As I learned, the Third Georgia and Fourth Tennessee were in advance, and waded Clinch River, which, being swollen a little, came up to their arm-pits. It is impossible to draw the Yankees in a fair, open field fight, but they are always found in strong position, as in this instance. Two miles