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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
y, turning at bay here and there, when the whelps dog his heels too insolently, with a glare and a growl instructive to them to observe a wholesome interval; while Ashby, ubiquitous, peers everywhere over the Masanuttin, upon the advance of Shields—burns bridge after bridge, Mount Jackson bridge, White House bridge, Columbia bridgengstreet struggling in the lists, Hemmed in an ugly gorge. Pope and his Yankees whipped before, ‘Bayonets and Grape!’ hear Stonewall roar. Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby's score In Stonewall Jackson's way! Ah, maiden! wait and watch, and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah, widow! read with eyes that burn That ring upon thy hhypothetical maps, as country guides; instead of the men of the vicinage with focal knowledge. Far better would it have been for Jackson had he now inquired among Ashby's troopers for the boy who had hunted foxes and rabbits through the coppices around Lewiston. Him should he have set to guide Taylor's brigade to the enemy's rear<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
t from his mate. They forgot that it is the prerogative of genius, to have no need to repeat itself; its resources are ever new; it can invent, can create upon occasion. It is dull dunce-hood, which only knows how to repeat the lesson that has been well beaten into it. The Southern Lion, then, marches surlily up the great Valley, turning at bay here and there, when the whelps dog his heels too insolently, with a glare and a growl instructive to them to observe a wholesome interval; while Ashby, ubiquitous, peers everywhere over the Masanuttin, upon the advance of Shields—burns bridge after bridge, Mount Jackson bridge, White House bridge, Columbia bridge, entailing continued insulation upon him. The mighty hunt reaches Harrisonburg. Will it turn again eastward to the mountain? Shields shall see, he reaches Conrad's store. There is the old lair, the munition of rocks, but no Jackson seeking to crouch in it; only the bridge leading to it, (and which alone could lead him out of it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson's way. (search)
s to scoff; Attention! it's his way. Appealing from his native sod, In forma pauperis, to God, “Lay bare thine arms! Stretch forth thy rod; Amen!” —that's Stonewall's way. He's in the saddle now. Fall in! Steady, the whole brigade! Hill's at the ford, cut off. We'll win His way out, ball and blade. What matter if our shoes are worn? What matter if our feet are torn? Quick step! We're with him before dawn. That's Stonewall Jackson's way. The sun's bright lances rout the mists Of morning; and, by George! Here's Longstreet struggling in the lists, Hemmed in an ugly gorge. Pope and his Yankees whipped before, ‘Bayonets and Grape!’ hear Stonewall roar. Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby's score In Stonewall Jackson's way! Ah, maiden! wait and watch, and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah, widow! read with eyes that burn That ring upon thy hand. Ah, wife! sew on, pray on, hope on; Thy life shall not be all forlorn, The foe had better ne'er been born That gets in Stonew
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
ingly, but pregnant with disappointment. And here let me remark upon a mischievous specimen of red-tapeism, which I saw often practiced to our detriment, even sometimes by Jackson, who was least bound by professional trammels. It was the employing of engineer officers, with their pocket compasses and pretty, red and blue crayon, hypothetical maps, as country guides; instead of the men of the vicinage with focal knowledge. Far better would it have been for Jackson had he now inquired among Ashby's troopers for the boy who had hunted foxes and rabbits through the coppices around Lewiston. Him should he have set to guide Taylor's brigade to the enemy's rear, with a Captain's commission before him if he guided it to victory, and a pistol's muzzle behind his left ear in case he played false. The other blunder was, in appearance, even more trivial: The footbridge, constructed by moonlight, and designed to pass four men abreast, proved at one point so unsteady that only a single plank
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
ll the fact that even amid the animosities of war there were instances of warm friendship existing between soldiers of the opposing armies. That playful correspondence between Jeb Stuart and his old West Point chum at Lewinsville, in 1861, the capture of his old classmate by Fitz. Lee in 1862, and the jolly time they had together as they sang Benny Havens O! and revived memories of Auld Lang Syne—the meeting between Major Bob Wheat and Colonel Percy Wyndham, when the latter was captured by Ashby near Harrisonburg, Va., in 1862, and many similar incidents, might be given to show that there were friendships which could not be broken by the fact that honest men took opposite sides in the war. But one of the most conspicuous illustrations is the warm friendship which existed to the last between two prominent actors in the great drama—General Winfield Scott and General R. E. Lee. This friendship begun in the Mexican war, was cemented up to the time that Lee resigned his commission an