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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Turner Ashby or search for Turner Ashby in all documents.

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ed small personal impulse to poetic flight. No cause for regret in this; they need no imperishable literature to prolong their fame to a busy and forgetful posterity. Their deeds are their fittest memorial. The like may be said of Stonewall Jackson, although his picturesque campaigns have been sung in the vivid, rousing stanzas of Palmer's Stonewall Jackson's way. Yet it remains true that fine feeling has usually been touched by the thought of men now overshadowed, of some Zollicoffer, or Ashby, or Pelham. The greatest figure of the war has received a more enduring commemoration. Indeed, Lincoln has inspired the finest imaginative product of the period. Walt Whitman's mystic dirge, When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloom'd, which Swinburne enthusiastically pronounced the most sonorous nocturn ever chanted in the church of the world, though too long for inclusion in this volume, consecrates with power and deep-toned solemnity the death of all who never returned from the colossal
ered with swift renown; He, with the martyr's amaranthine wreath, Twining the victor's crown! James Ryder Randall. Ashby Turner Ashby of Virginia (1824-1862) distinguished himself as a leader of cavalry under Stonewall Jackson. The EnglTurner Ashby of Virginia (1824-1862) distinguished himself as a leader of cavalry under Stonewall Jackson. The English military writer, Colonel Henderson, says of him: Ashby was the beau-ideal of a captain of light-horse. His reckless daring, both across-country and under fire, made him the idol of the army. Nor was his reputation confined to the Confederate raAshby was the beau-ideal of a captain of light-horse. His reckless daring, both across-country and under fire, made him the idol of the army. Nor was his reputation confined to the Confederate ranks. I think even our men, says a Federal officer, had a kind of admiration for him, as he sat unmoved upon his horse, and let them pepper away at him as if he enjoyed it. To the brave all homage render! Weep, ye skies of June! With a radiance pun ugly gorge. Pope and his Dutchmen, whipped before; ‘Bay'nets and grape!’ hear Stonewall roar; ‘Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby's score!’ In ‘Stonewall Jackson's way.’ Ah, Maiden! wait and watch and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah, Wid