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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
der Fulkerson. He had also five batteries and Ashby's regiment of cavalry. General Banks had his s withdrew without attacking. The activity of Ashby, and the boldness with which Jackson maintainert after a march of twenty-two miles. Meantime Ashby was following close behind the retreating enemof the 22d, as Jackson was entering Strasburg, Ashby was attacking the Federal pickets one mile south of Winchester. After the skirmish, Ashby camped for the night at Kernstown, three miles south Shields' report — Rebellion Record, volume IV; Ashby's reports. This information, transmitted to Ja sent three companies of infantry to reinforce Ashby and followed with his whole force. He reachedwere consumed in going fifteen miles. Meantime Ashby was demonstrating against the enemy, and keepi was given to rest; and sorrow for the loss of Ashby replaced all other feelings for the time. But the softer feelings of sadness and grief. As Ashby is borne away to his burial, all thoughts turn[9 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragrpahs. (search)
those stirring movements by which Winchester changed hands no less than eighty-three times during the war, and we can almost see Johnston, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, Ashby, A. P. Hill, Early, Breckinridge, Gordon, Rodes, Ramseur, Pegram, and other chieftians leading their brave men to the onset. How appropriate that, amid such scee recognized as among our most gallant Confederate soldiers. In the line were (besides a number of artillery and infantry volunteer companies) several remnants of Ashby's old cavalry, the Maryland Confederate Army and Navy Society, 400 strong; survivors of Murray's company of the Maryland line, a large number of the old foot cavalry who followed Stonewall Jackson, and numbers of the men who rode with Ashby. In carriages were Governor Holliday, General John T. Morgan, of Alabama; Rev. Dr. A. C. Hopkins, the chaplain of the old Second Virginia infantry; J. Wm. Jones, secretary Southern Historical Society; General Fauntleroy, General W. H. F. Lee, General E
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
The cavalry crossed at the fords without serious molestation, bringing up the rear on that route by 8 A. M. on the 14th. To Baker's (late Hampton's) brigade was assigned the duty of picketing the Potomac from Falling Waters to Hedgesville. The other brigades were moved back towards Leetown — Robertson's being sent to the fords of the Shenandoah, where he already had a picket, which, under Captain Johnston, of the North Carolina cavalry, had handsomely repulsed the enemy in their advance on Ashby's gap, inflicting severe loss, with great disparity in numbers. Harper's Ferry was again in possession of the enemy, and Colonel Harman, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, had in an engagement with the enemy gained a decided success, but was himself captured by his horse falling. Upon my arrival at the Bower that afternoon (15th), I learned that a large force of the enemy's cavalry was between Shepherdstown and Leetown, and determined at once to attack him, in order to defeat any designs he mig
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
reveille. I desire to say a word or two for Ashby, who was often blamed for what he could not pron that for a time existed between Jackson and Ashby. Others had to handle the same force after AsAshby's death, but it took time to accomplish what never was given Ashby — as he could never get his I have made above an explanation in defence of Ashby, believing it will make clear some of the diff one time a bitter feeling between Jackson and Ashby — it was reconciled. I do not think that even General Jackson fully appreciated Ashby's troubles, because he complained of his disorganized commirginia and the Sixth Virginia cavalry. Colonel Turner Ashby, just promoted, had his twenty-six comps of cavalry, but there was no concert between Ashby and Steuart. General G. H. Steuart, a good eneral Ewell formed the highest admiration for Ashby, and told me the day Ashby was killed, that su from an unbiased stand-point what was done by Ashby I was to co-operate with him, and but for that[10 more...]<