Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Turner Ashby or search for Turner Ashby in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
the army of the Confederate States, and from Colonel Jackson, in command at Harper's Ferry, permission to rendezvous on the Virginia side, opposite Point of Rocks, marched out of Frederick to that place, crossed the Potomac and reported to Capt. Turner Ashby, then posted there with his troops of horse. Ashby was to feed the Marylanders until further orders. This pioneer company showed the way, and in a few days detachments of companies began to straggle in—the debris of Trimble's fifteen thouAshby was to feed the Marylanders until further orders. This pioneer company showed the way, and in a few days detachments of companies began to straggle in—the debris of Trimble's fifteen thousand enrolled volunteers in Baltimore. Some marched with a semblance of order from Baltimore to the Point of Rocks. Some straggled in by twos and threes. Some came in squads on the railroad. But the State was aflame and a steady stream of gallant youth poured into the rendezvous at Point of Rocks and Harper's Ferry. By May 21st there were the skeletons of eight companies collected at Point of Rocks: Co. A. Capt. Bradley T. Johnson. Co. B. Capt. C. C. Edelin, at Harper's Ferry. Co.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
ver Confederate cavalry when it pleased them. Ashby and Steuart were in command of the cavalry, any pressed on the Confederate cavalry rear, but Ashby, as crafty as an Indian, drew him into an ambunt, the Forty-fourth Virginia next. Ewell and Ashby were riding at the head of the Fifty-eighth, AAshby's dark face afire with enthusiasm. His hair and head were as black as a crow and his beard grphy, swinging his arm right and left. Look at Ashby enjoying himself, said the Maryland colonel toight showed that they had found the enemy, and Ashby moved the Virginians in line straight to the f. At this time the fire on the right, where Ashby was, had become hot—and growing every second. y as they avenged the death of the gallant General Ashby, who fell at the same time. Four color bethe Federals would make a more serious attack, Ashby called for an infantry support. The brigade oounded and three missing. In this affair Gen. Turner Ashby was killed. It is a curious commenta