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d this place on the twenty-sixth, the enemy's advance having halted at Harrisonburgh. Jackson is much censured for this fight, and although he acted according to orders, is cursed by every one. We lost no baggage, nor any persons of prominence, but the enemy had several officers killed. Shields himself was desperately wounded in the arm by a shell. There seems to be the fulfilment of his own apostrophe to heaven, in this man Shields. He was a very successful and dashing general of volunteers in Mexico, commanded the New-York Volunteers there, and at one time led on the Palmetto (South-Carolina) Regiment in a storming party, in which he was successful. Several years subsequently, at a banquet in Charleston, (South-Carolina,) he had greatly eulogized the South-Carolinians for their gallantry and heroism, and in token of admiration for Southern valor, wished that his right arm might be palsied or shattered, rather than draw a sabre against the sons of the sunny South. Ashton.
Jackson, whose movements in the Valley began to excite interest about this time. The Major had seen him at Manassas, and spoke of him dispassionately. He had not achieved much greatness in that conflict, but received a name there which will be as imperishable as history. I received letters a few days ago from Ashton, said my friend, who is now with Jackson in the Valley; you knew Ashton very well. Amuse yourself while I take a nap, for 'tis nearly dawn, and I must be out in camp early. Jackson, whose movements in the Valley began to excite interest about this time. The Major had seen him at Manassas, and spoke of him dispassionately. He had not achieved much greatness in that conflict, but received a name there which will be as imperishable as history. I received letters a few days ago from Ashton, said my friend, who is now with Jackson in the Valley; you knew Ashton very well. Amuse yourself while I take a nap, for 'tis nearly dawn, and I must be out in camp early.
e ground in great confusion, thrown away by the panic-stricken soldiers . Colonel Gordon and staff are safe; also General Williams and staff. While retreating through Winchester, women from the houses opened fire of pistols upon our soldiers, and killed a great many of them. My reader will not fail to observe from the above, that General Banks's body. guard is composed of negroes, and that the women of Winchester killed a great many of the Yankees. God forbid that any army of ours should be so broken up and so totally demoralized as was that of the vain-glorious and arrant Abolitionist, General N. P. Banks. How many millions of dollars they have lost in this retreat of three days will never be known, and perhaps can not be calculated; but this I do know, that we are now wallowing in the luxuries of life, and Jackson has sufficient stores to last an indefinite time, should we successfully transport them out of the Valley. Excuse haste, and believe me yours, Ashton.
out parallel, but though the majority think that these movements were all his own, it may not be so. He was constantly in receipt of orders from Lee, and he faithfully obeyed them. No man in the army is half so obedient as old Stonewall, or so determined to be obeyed; the result is, that no army has shown greater endurance, marched farther, fought more frequently, suffered less, or done half the work that has fallen to our lot. Our men seem to know intuitively the designs of their commanders, and they second them without a murmur. Where we are marching to now, I cannot form the least idea, but as we move eastward, it is whispered that we go to Charlottesville to recruit, and after being heavily reenforced, may reenter the Valley again, and perhaps push for Maryland. All at present is profound mystery, but I am sincerely rejoiced at the prospect of some little rest. A messenger starts to-night across country for Richmond, and I hurriedly close to send by him. Yours, Ashton.