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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Captain Wilkes's seizure of Mason and Slidell. (search)
ld immediately demand their release, and that our Government would be obliged to accede to this demand. When Mr. Slidell was leaving the side of the Trent, he said to his wife, Good-bye, my dear, we shall meet in Paris in 60 days. If I remember aright, he was but 20 days longer in rejoining her. After the war I had a conversation with Captain Moir, in the presence of an English chaplain, at St. Thomas. Captain Moir was there in command of a large steamer running between Liverpool and Aspinwall, and I was in command of the Susquehanna. Captain Moir invited the chaplain and myself to lunch, and after we were relieved from the presence of the waiters, only we three in the cabin, he then reverted to an interview he had with the British Admiralty on his return to England, whither he had been called from St. Thomas. They were very much disappointed and displeased with him for not having thrown the Trent on our hands, to which he replied (so he said to me) that it never had occurred t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
ac and give battle to the enemy or drive him south, etc. On October 7th McClellan, in General orders no. 163, referred to the Proclamation of Emancipation. He warned the army of the danger to military discipline of heated political discussions, and reminded them that the remedy for political errors, if any are committed, is to be found only in the action of the people at the polls. On October 5th General McClellan had said, in aletter to his wife [see McClellan's own story, p. 655], Mr. Aspinwall [W. H., of New York] is decidedly of the opinion that it is my duty to submit to the President's proclamation and quietly continue doing my duty as a soldier. I presume he is right, and am at least sure that he is honest in his opinion. I shall surely give his views full consideration.--Editors. Porter's corps was ordered to report to Burnside to relieve the picket line and some of the regiments in the most exposed position. One brigade was sent over the Antietam for this purpose