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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 4 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 1 1 Browse Search
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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
tion, the most complete that exists on the tactics of battles, and if it falls sometimes into an excess contrary to that of the Prussian general, by prescribing, in doctrines details of execution often impracticable in war, he cannot be denied a truly remarkable merit, and one of the first grades among tacticians. I have made mention in this sketch only of general treatises, and not of particular works on the special arms. The books of Montalembert, of Saint-Paul, Bousmard, of Carnot, of Aster, and of Blesson, have caused progress to be made in the art of sieges and of fortification. The writings of Laroche-Aymon, Muller and Bismark, have also thrown light upon many questions regarding the cavalry. In a journal with which, unfortunately, I was not acquainted until six years after its publication, the latter has believed it his duty to attack me and my works, because I had said, on the faith of an illustrious general, that the Prussians had reproached him with having copied, in h
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 13: permanent fortifications.—Historical Notice of the progress of this Art.—Description of the several parts of a Fortress, and the various Methods of fortifying a position (search)
n engineers. It is applied in a modified form to the new fortifications of Paris. Baron Rohault de Fleury has introduced many modifications of the ordinary French system in his new defences of Lyons. We have seen no written account of these works, but from a hasty examination in 1844, they struck us as being too complicated and expensive. The new fortifications of Western Germany are modifications of Rempler's system, as improved by De la Chiche and Montalembert. It is said that General Aster, the directing engineer, has also introduced some of the leading principles of Chasseloup and Carnot. The English engineers have satisfied themselves with following in the track of their continental neighbors, and can offer no claims to originality. Of the system of fortification now followed in our service we must decline expressing any opinion; the time has not yet arrived for subjecting it to a severe and judicious criticism. But of the system pursued previous to 1820, we may s
all windlass, and incapable of rapid loading and discharge. For illustrations see Iconographic Encyclopedia, Frost's pictorial history ; and for descriptions see Gibbon's history and other works treating of ancient and mediaeval military tactics and weapons. The use of the bow is of great antiquity. Plato credits Apollo with the invention. Ishmael became an archer (Gen. XXI. 20). The Philistine archers overcame Saul (1 Sam. XXXI. 3). David commanded it to be taught (2 Sam. i. 18). Aster of Amphipolis shot Philip of Macedon, and was hanged therefor. An ancient Egyptian bow is preserved in the Abbott Museum, New York, together with the leather case that contained it and fastened it to the war-chariot. Four arrows, made of reed and tipped with flint-stone, are suspended with it. The Scythian bow was remarkable for its great curvature, being nearly semicircular. The Lycian bow was made of the cornel-tree; those of the Ethiopians of the palm-tree. The horn of the antelo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country, April days (search)
ehold and monkish names adhere, they are sufficient for popular and poetic purposes, and the familiar use of scientific names seems an affectation. But here, where many native flowers have no popular names at all, and others are called confessedly by wrong ones,—where it really costs less trouble to use Latin names than English,—the affectation seems the other way. Think of the long list of wild-flowers where the Latin name is spontaneously used by all who speak of the flower: as, Arethusa, Aster, Cistus (after the fall of the cistus-flower), Clematis, Clethra, Geranium, Iris, Lobelia, Rhodora, Spiraea, Tiarella, Trientalis, and so on. Even those formed from proper names—the worst possible system of nomenclature—become tolerable at last, and we forget the godfather in the more attractive namesake. When the person concerned happens to be a botanist, there is a peculiar fitness in the association; the Linnaea, at least, would not smell so sweet by any other name. In other cases th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country, The procession of the flowers (search)
e has, in every zone, stamped on the landscape the peculiar type of beauty proper to the locality. But every midsummer reveals the same tendency. In early spring, when all is bare, and small objects are easily made prominent, the wild-flowers are generally delicate. Later, when all verdure is profusely expanded, these miniature strokes would be lost, and Nature then practises landscape-gardening in large, lights up the copses with great masses of White Alder, makes the roadsides gay with Aster and Golden-Rod, and tops the tall, coarse Meadow-Grass with nodding Lilies and tufted Spiraea. One instinctively follows these plain hints, and gathers bouquets sparingly in spring and exuberantly in summer. The use of wild-flowers for decorative purposes merits a word in passing, for it is unquestionably a branch of high art in favored hands. It is true that we are bidden, on high authority, to love the wood-rose and leave it on its stalk; but against this may be set the saying of Bett
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), At sundown (search)
e green banks, where falls too soon The shade of Autumn's afternoon, The south wind blowing soft and sweet, The water gliding at my feet, The distant northern range uplit By the slant sunshine over it, With changes of the mountain mist From tender blush to amethyst, The valley's stretch of shade and gleam Fair as in Mirza's Bagdad dream, With glad young faces smiling near And merry voices in my ear, I sit, methinks, as Hafiz might In Iran's Garden of Delight. For Persian roses blushing red, Aster and gentian bloom instead; For Shiraz wine, this mountain air; For feast, the blueberries which I share With one who proffers with stained hands Her gleanings from yon pasture lands, Wild fruit that art and culture spoil, The harvest of an untilled soil; And with her one whose tender eyes Reflect the change of April skies, Midway 'twixt child and maiden yet, Fresh as Spring's earliest violet; And one whose look and voice and ways Make where she goes idyllic days; And one whose sweet, still c
kee papers, containing accounts of our captures, and learned the excitement regarding us. Several vessels have been sent out in pursuit. A Washington telegram says: "The first information of the depredations of the pirate Tallahassee was received by the Navy Department, on the 12th instant, after office hours.--Secretary Welles immediately ordered the following vessels in pursuit, namely: Juniatta, Susquehanna, Eolus, Rontoosue, Dumbarton and Tristam Shaudy, on the 13th; the Moccasin, Aster, Zantic, R. R. Cuyler and Grand Gulf, on the 14th; and on the 15th, the Decotah and San Jacinto. These were all the vessels available in the navy." All these steamers, and more, starting out daily after one small vessel, short of coal and sadly in want of repairs! British neutrality! I stood on the deck, in the moonlight, thinking of the strange neutrality that works only against one side, and that, perhaps, the weaker. About 11 o'clock we crossed the bar and ran out to sea, th