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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George T. Atkins or search for George T. Atkins in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Then followed, at the hotel, an elegant banquet, seasoned with some very admirable speaking. Early the next morning (the 8th) we were off for Dallas, where the same cordial reception awaited us. General W. L. Cabell, Major Helm, George T. Atkins, M. K. Thorburn, Rev. R. T. Hanks, and their efficient committee, met us at the depot, escorted us to comfortable quarters at the hotel, and gave us every attention during our stay. It was pleasant to have even a bird's eye view of this pm of a Captain of Infantry. Seeing that we were a private party and believing himself to be an intruder, he was about to beat a retreat, but we pressed him to join us, and after some hesitation he consented to do so. He introduced himself as Captain Atkins, of Wheat's battalion, and told us that the battalion was on picket duty, and he on the grand round, and had come out of his way to warm himself by the hospitable fireside of the tavern. Learning from him that Major Wheat was on the line, M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
t. This court cannot sit while General Fitzhugh Lee is in town. The Judge's introductory speech was appropriate, graceful and eloquent. General Lee's lecture was received with the usual enthusiasm, and its finer passages rapturously applauded. Then followed, at the hotel, an elegant banquet, seasoned with some very admirable speaking. Early the next morning (the 8th) we were off for Dallas, where the same cordial reception awaited us. General W. L. Cabell, Major Helm, George T. Atkins, M. K. Thorburn, Rev. R. T. Hanks, and their efficient committee, met us at the depot, escorted us to comfortable quarters at the hotel, and gave us every attention during our stay. It was pleasant to have even a bird's eye view of this pushing, thriving city, which has run up, within a short period, from a small town to a city of over twenty thousand inhabitants. At night the two military companies escorted General Lee to the hall, where a large and enthusiastic audience greeted
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A reminiscence of the Christmas of 1861. (search)
harpened the already keen appetites of the hungry soldiers-such appetites as we had twenty years ago. In the midst of this scene of enjoyment, a solitary horseman rode up to the house, dismounted and entered—a tall soldierly looking man, in uniform of a Captain of Infantry. Seeing that we were a private party and believing himself to be an intruder, he was about to beat a retreat, but we pressed him to join us, and after some hesitation he consented to do so. He introduced himself as Captain Atkins, of Wheat's battalion, and told us that the battalion was on picket duty, and he on the grand round, and had come out of his way to warm himself by the hospitable fireside of the tavern. Learning from him that Major Wheat was on the line, Meade and I started off in search of him. We found him at his headquarters, a fly under a tree, at the cross road, and it required no great deal of eloquence to induce him to join our dinner-party, for the Major was one of those whole souls that would