hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for H. Atkinson or search for H. Atkinson in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

ence. The Secretary of War, in his report for 1832, says: The arrangements of the commanding general, as well in the pursuit as in the action, were prompt and judicious, and the conduct of the officers and men was exemplary. President Jackson, in his annual message, approves of the action of the military authorities, thus: The hostile incursions of the Sac and Fox Indians necessarily led to the interposition of the Government. A portion of the troops under Generals Scott and Atkinson, and of the militia of the State of Illinois, were called into the field. After a harassing warfare, prolonged by the nature of the country and by the difficulty of procuring subsistence, the Indians were entirely defeated, and the disaffected band dispersed or destroyed. The result has been creditable to the troops engaged in the service. Severe as is the lesson to the Indians, it was rendered necessary by their unprovoked aggressions; and it is to be hoped that its impression will be p
visit to Washington. Determines to embark in the Texan Revolution. As soon as it was manifest that Black Hawk and the British band were utterly crushed, General Atkinson disbanded the volunteers, and distributed the regulars according to the exigencies of the service. That officer had concluded the campaign, which was really Johnston. His power of rebuke lay in his serenity and benignity. It was clearly seen that it was the sentiment, not the person, that was condemned. General Atkinson dropped down the river to Prairie du Chien, on August 3d; and, having delayed there until the 25th, proceeded to Rock Island. In consequence of the movementbject, you would accomplish your purpose most rapidly in Louisiana; but the climate and slave-property are objections .... I duly received the account of General Atkinson's expedition. He pursued a wise and prudent policy. If he had hurried on and been defeated, the whole frontier would have been exposed, while the timid and