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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
gers's native town of Plymouth no meeting-house could be obtained, and recourse was had to a maple grove across the river Aug. 24, 1841. in Holderness. Semi-circular seats, backed against a line of magnificent Writings of N. P. Rogers, p. 160days when we went gypsying, or else of psalms, in good time and harmony, Ibid., p. 190. on the descent of Mt. Washington; Aug. 28, 1841. or on the visit to the Willey House, where, says Rogers, we wrote brother Garrison's [name] and our own linked istic of the men and the Ibid., p. 177. time to be omitted: As we rode through the [Franconia] Notch after friends Aug. 25, 1841. Beach and Rogers, we were alarmed at seeing smoke issue from Thos. Parnell Beach, Ezekiel Rogers. their chaisethat he, an abolitionist, E. Rogers. on his way to an anti-slavery convention, should desecrate his At Littleton, N. H., Aug. 26, 1841. anti-slavery mouth and that glorious Mountain Notch with a stupefying tobacco weed. We had halted at the Iron
ven an implied compliment at the expense of one whose past services and present value to the cause of human freedom I feel to be unequalled. Elsewhere, the Liberator's cry, No Union with Slaveholders! (now printed weekly at the head of the paper) was caught up and re-echoed in the abolition ranks—by the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, in Feb. 5-7, 1845; Lib. 15.33. February; by a vast majority of the Eastern Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society at Kennett, in August. In Ohio, the Aug. 11-13; Lib. 15.135, 142. Anti-Slavery Bugle was founded as the disunion organ of the Ohio American Anti-Slavery Society. Lib. 15.109. The levers of disunion ready to the hands of the Massachusetts abolitionists were the recent expulsions of the Ante, pp. 130, 131. State's delegates from South Carolina and Louisiana, and the impending annexation of Texas. At the annual meeting just referred to, Wendell Phillips reported Lib. 15.19. resolves that the Governor should demand of the Feder
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
uly 31, and, after a few days' rest, the three friends went up to London, where Aug. 3, 1846. George Thompson met them and took the two Americans to his own home in He was received with enthusiastic cheering, hundreds rising London Universe, Aug. 28, 1846; from their seats. He wished to know if they were in earnest when theand which met 1200 strong in London, in mid-August, full of great expectations, Aug. 19, 1846. yet not without apprehensions of discord. A preliminary British confmeeting at Playford Hall, Mr. Garrison, with Douglass for his companion, betook Aug. 24-28, 1846. himself to Bristol and Exeter. At the former place he was the gue and soul with you. I trust we shall form an auxiliary to the League in Exeter. Aug. 28, 1846. We are to meet with a select number of friends at Bishop's residence, tomorrow (Thursday) evening. Thus, you see, our way is fully Aug. 27, 1846. prepared before us. Mr. Estlin thinks there ought to be an auxiliary to the League
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
om Norwich to New York was as serene and quiet Aug. 2-3. as possible, where we arrived at 5 o'clock. At 9 o'clock, I Aug. 3. crossed the ferry and took the cars for Philadelphia—arriving at 2 o'clouse had been obtained for us for Saturday and Aug. 7, 8. Sunday evenings. Hitherto, nearly all t On Monday, we left Harrisburg in the cars for Aug. 9. Chambersburg, a distance of fifty-four mile towards evening, entirely exhausted, but soon Aug. 11. recovered myself by a good warm bath. A mrenoon, Milo [Townsend], Dr. Peck, Dr. Weaver, Aug. 14, 1847. Charles Schirras, and myself, ascendternoon, at 4 o'clock, Dr. Peck (he is a fine, Aug. 14. promising colored young man, son of my oldto fill up the gap at the meetings. To-day, I Aug. 16. leave for New Lyme (forty miles off), wherhe morning we rode over to Twinsburg, where we Aug. 24. found collected in a beautiful grove aboutommencement day at O., and we shall leave here Aug. 25. soon after breakfast, hoping to arrive at [24 more...]