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eindeer Each built in thirty-six days for privateering.S. Lapham'sC. TurnerBenjamin Rich and othersBoston381.75 41 BrigAbaellino A privateer.George Fuller'sJames FordJoseph Lee, jun.Boston144.62 421815ShipPersiaGeorge Fuller'sJames FordHenry Austin and othersNew York371.72 43 BrigPantherT. Magoun'sT. MagounWinslow LewisBoston429.68 44 BrigFalconT. Magoun'sT. MagounW. Lewis & T. MagounBoston & Medford236.20 45 BrigPedlarT. Magoun'sT. MagounJoseph CabotBoston125.88 46 ShipCourierT. MagodBoston82 99 Sch.TremiumS. Lapham's------RogersRobert RipleyBoston62 100 ShipHannibal Struck with lightning, at sea, on her passage from Charleston to Liverpool, and burnt, with the loss of a part of her crew.Sprague & James'sSprague & JamesAustin & LewisBoston317 101 BrigGrecian Burnt at the wharf, in New Orleans.Sprague & James'sSprague & JamesR. D. ShepherdBoston244 102 BrigPheasantGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerHenry HoveyBoston170 103 Sch.SpyGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerStanton,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers killed in action. (search)
.,June 3, 1864. Atkinson, Daniel W.,10th Batt. Mass. L. A.,Hatcher's Run, Va.,Oct. 27, 1864. Atkinson, George A.,13th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 1, 1863. Atkinson, Robert,1st Mass. H. A.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 19, 1864. Atwood, Eli, Sergt.,18th Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va.,Dec. 13, 1862. Atwood, Frederick E.,18th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Atwood, Joshua,12th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Atwood, William M.,18th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Austin, Henry,29th Mass. Inf.,White Oak Swamp, Va.,June 30, 1862. Austin, James H.,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Avery, Michael,39th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 10, 1864. Ayers, Benjamin F.,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Babbington, William, Sergt.,12th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 1, 1863. Babbitt, Charles E.,39th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 8, 1864. Babson, Sylvanus B., Sergt.,32d Mass. Inf.,Laurel Hill, Va.,May 18, 1864. Bachelor, Alfred A.,15th Ma
.,June 3, 1864. Atkinson, Daniel W.,10th Batt. Mass. L. A.,Hatcher's Run, Va.,Oct. 27, 1864. Atkinson, George A.,13th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 1, 1863. Atkinson, Robert,1st Mass. H. A.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 19, 1864. Atwood, Eli, Sergt.,18th Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va.,Dec. 13, 1862. Atwood, Frederick E.,18th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Atwood, Joshua,12th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Atwood, William M.,18th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Austin, Henry,29th Mass. Inf.,White Oak Swamp, Va.,June 30, 1862. Austin, James H.,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Avery, Michael,39th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 10, 1864. Ayers, Benjamin F.,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Babbington, William, Sergt.,12th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 1, 1863. Babbitt, Charles E.,39th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 8, 1864. Babson, Sylvanus B., Sergt.,32d Mass. Inf.,Laurel Hill, Va.,May 18, 1864. Bachelor, Alfred A.,15th Ma
490 Ash, D. B., 440 Ash, Francis, 330 Ashley, W. A., 118, 330 Ashworth, John, 497 Atkins, B. H., Jr., 440 Atkins, Hartwell, 440, 497 Atkins, J. B., 330 Atkins, W. H., 440 Atkinson, D. W., 330 Atkinson, G. A., 830 Atkinson, Robert, 330 Atmore, Charles, 497 Attwood, C. G., 116 Atwood, A. S., 440 Atwood, C. H., 497 Atwood, Eli, 330 Atwood, F. E., 330 Atwood, J. E., 497 Atwood, Joshua, 330 Atwood, L. D., 490 Atwood, W. M., 330 Augustus, Charles, 497 Ault, P. M., 497 Austin, Henry, 330 Austin, J. H., 330 Austin, S. J., 490 Avery, C. R., 440 Avery, J. W. C., 497 Avery, Michael, 330 Avignon, Peter, 497 Axtell, F. H., 497 Ayers, B. F., 330 Ayers, G. W., 497 Ayers, J. T., 440 B. Babbington, William, 330 Babbitt, Albert, 497 Babbitt, C. E., 330 Babcock, A. J., 440 Babcock, J. W., 440 Babo, Alois, 135 Babson, F. J., 326 Babson, S. B., 330 Bacheller, Alfred, 490 Bacheller, J. C., 321 Bachelor, A. A., 330 Backus, C. H., 330 Bacon, D. H., 330 B
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XI (search)
me cases, as in Whitman's My Captain, the high-water mark may have been attained precisely at the moment when the poet departed from his theory and confined himself most nearly to the laws he was wont to spurn—in this case, by coming nearest to a regularity of rhythm. The praise generally bestowed on the admirable selections in the Library of American Literature, by Mr. Stedman and Miss Hutchinson, is a proof that there is a certain consensus of opinion on this subject. Had they left out Austin's Peter Rugg, or Hale's A Man Without a Country, there would have been a general feeling of discontent. It would have been curious to see if, had these editors been forced by public opinion to put in something of their own, they would have inserted what others would regard as their high-water mark. I should have predicted that it would be so; and that this would be, in Stedman's case, the stanzas beginning— Thou art mine; thou hast given thy word, and closing with that unsurpassed poe
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVII (search)
XVII American translators the English-speaking race has a strong instinct for translation, extending through both its branches. Miss Mitford says of one of her heroes in a country town, He translated Horace, as all gentlemen do; and Mrs. Austin speaks of Goethe's Faust as that untranslatable poem which every Englishman translates. Americans are not behind their British cousins in these labors; and Professor Boyesen —who, as a Norseman by birth and an American by adoption, is free of alors; thus Chapman so Chapmanizes Homer that in the long run his version fails to give pleasure; and Fiztgerald has whole lines in his Agamemnon which are not in Aeschylus and are almost indistinguishable in flavor from his Omar Khayyam. Even Mrs. Austin, in that exquisite version quoted by Longfellow in his Hyperion, beginning Many a year is in its grave, has infused into it a tinge of dreamy sentiment slightly beyond that conveyed by Uhland in the original. It is perhaps more beautifu
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
erary influence of, 65. American press, as viewed by Irving, 2. Americanism, English standard of, 20. Andersen, H. C., 214. Anglomania, origin of, 64. Anti-slavery agitation, literary influence of, 66. Apologies, unnecessary, 120. Archer, the jockey, 205. Ariosto, Lodovico, 187. Aristophanes, 99, 229. Aristotle, 174, 232. Arnold, Sir, Edwin, 106, 110. Arnold, Matthew, 3, 5, 19, 20, 21, 22, 35, 38, 46, 91, 123, 195, 206, 208. Austen, Jane, 10, 15, 219, 229. Austin, Henry, 101. Austin, Sarah, 144. B. Background, the need of a, 113. Bacon, Lord, 114, 175. Bailey, P. J., 57. Bain, Alexander, 202. Balzac, H. de, 114. Bancroft, George, 107, 155. Bancroft, H. H., 172. Barker, Lemuel, 184. Bartlett, J. R., 216. Beaconsfield, Lord, 110, 167, 179, 180. Beecher, H. W., 60. Besant, Walter, 74. Bigelow, 54. Billings, Josh, 59. Black, William, 202. Blaine, J. G., 110. Blake, William, 218. Bonaparte, Napoleon, 28, 52, 109, 188, 234. Book c
Selling a horse without permission. --Henry Austin, a dealer in horses, was brought before the Head of Police yesterday, charged by Dr. James, of Goochland, with disposing of his horse for $230 to a citizen of Petersburg, named Burton, when he had no authority to do so, and the owner asked $400 for the animal. It was in proof that the matter had been submitted to the Assistant Provost Marshal of the Eastern District, and had been dismissed, and that the Provost Marshal. Major Griswold, haat the matter had been submitted to the Assistant Provost Marshal of the Eastern District, and had been dismissed, and that the Provost Marshal. Major Griswold, had sent it before the Mayor. It was contended by Dr. James that he bad given no authority for the sale by Austin, quasi defendant. The price of the animal had been tendered to Dr. J. soon after the sale. The case was dismissed, with advice that the complainant, by the virtue of a civil action, could test the value of the horse, &c.
Horse case. --In the dispute that was narrated in last Tuesday's Dispatch, relative to the disposal of a horse, it was inadvertently stated that Henry Austin was arraigned before the Mayor as the defendant in the case, which was dismissed with an intimation that it was more a subject for a civil than a criminal action. It is proper to state, as a matter of justice, that Mr. Austin was merely called in as a witness. Horse case. --In the dispute that was narrated in last Tuesday's Dispatch, relative to the disposal of a horse, it was inadvertently stated that Henry Austin was arraigned before the Mayor as the defendant in the case, which was dismissed with an intimation that it was more a subject for a civil than a criminal action. It is proper to state, as a matter of justice, that Mr. Austin was merely called in as a witness.
the statement that it was designed for the liberation of the prisoners now in our hands. A sergeant who was brought in on Tuesday night, had in his haversack two silver teaspoons and a silver fork, on which are engraved the initials "J. M. M." This fellow had also a small china dish, of a very pretty pattern. On being questioned as to how he obtained them, he said that a squad of his men had been out foraging, and had presented him with the articles as his portion of their captures. Mr. Henry Austin, who lives near Ben. Green's, on his return home on Tuesday night, captured three prisoners, which he brought to this city, and deposited at Libby prison. Mrs. Patterson Allan. There was no truth in the report published yesterday that Mr. Patterson Allan fled with the Yankees when they visited Goochland on Tuesday morning. The enemy did not reach Mr. A.'s farm; but as soon as that gentleman heard of their proximity to his residence he took the first public conveyance which coul
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