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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 7: Cambridge in later life (search)
ren, though the latter in one moment of degeneracy made a similar remark. The strength of Whittier has been in finding all needed elements of poetry at home. In answer to this letter of criticism, Stedman replied that he was speaking only of his personal experience in youth; that it was not the sentiment of Newport or Boston, but of a Calvinistic back-country, where he was injured for life and almost perished of repression and atrophy. January 9, 1888 Do pay proper attention to William Austin, of whom Duyckinck has some account. I think his Peter Rugg had marked influence on Hawthorne. At any rate, he anticipated Hawthorne in what may be called the penumbra of his style-passing out of a purely imaginative creation through a medium neither real nor unreal and so getting back to common earth. Brockden Brown could not do this, but always had to come back with a slump upon somnambulism or ventriloquism; and Edward Bellamy, who has I think more of the pure Hawthorne invention t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
6, 287, 303. Amberleys, the, 258; at Newport, 225-27. Andrew, John A., War Governor of Massachusetts, 161, 162, 256. Andrews, Jane and Caroline, 17,18, and note, 241, 242. Anti-slavery, policy, 157-59. Appleton, Thomas G., 147; sketch of, 272-74. Army Life in a Black Regiment, 185, 219. Arnold, Matthew, in America, 323, 324; fame of, 333. Astors, the J. J., 266, 267. Atlantic Monthly, the, authors' dinner, 106-10, 112; editorship of, 111, 112; criticized, 112-14. Austin, William, 334. B Baltimore, Md., men killed at, 155. Barnum, P. T., 80, 81. Beecher, Henry Ward, description of, 45-48; compared with Parker, 46, 47, 53. Bigelow, Luther, 171, 175. Blackwell, Antoinette Brown, 111. Blackwell, Henry B., 60-63. Boston Authors' Club, 233. Bowens, the, of Baltimore, 165. Bradford, George P., 259, 260. Brook Farm, 14. Brown, Brownlee, 49. Brown, John, 77; family of, 84-88. Brown, Theophilus, 223. Brownings, the, in Venice, 30, 31, 315, 31
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
A June Migration. (In Appalachia, Dec.) Articles. (In Harper's Bazar, Independent.) 1888 Short Studies of American Authors. Rev. and enl. Address. (In Reunion of the Free-Soilers of 1848-1852, Boston, June 28.) Pph. John Brown. (In Appletons' Cyclopaedia of American Biography.) English Sources of American Dialect. (In American Antiquarian Society. Proceedings. New series, vol. 4.) Howell's Modern Italian Poets. (In Nation, Jan. 5.) A Precursor of Hawthorne [William Austin]. (In Independent. March 29.) English and American Manners. (In Forum, July.) Speech. (In Protest against the Majority Report on the Employment and Schooling of Children, and against any Legislative Interference with Private Schools, Massachusetts House Document, No. 19.) Pph. 1889 The Afternoon Landscape: Poems and Translations. Travellers and Outlaws. Three Outdoor Papers. (Riverside Literature Series.) Pph. Lowell in Cambridge. (In Critic, Feb. 23.) Vestis A
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 7: the Concord group (search)
have been influenced, or at least anticipated, by a writer who has been too much overlooked, and whose influence upon him seems to me quite perceptible, although his biographer, Prof. Woodberry, is disposed to set it entirely aside. This was William Austin, the author of Peter Rugg, the Missing man, a delineation more Hawthornesque, in my opinion, than anything in Scott, to whom Prof. Woodberry rightfully assigns some slight influence over Hawthorne. This tale was first printed in Buckingham'len within my knowledge. The original story purports to belong to the year 1820, and the scene of a later continuation is laid in the year 1825, both these being reprinted in the Boston book for 1841, and in the lately republished works of William Austin. It is the narrative, in the soberest language, of a series of glimpses of a man who spends his life in driving a horse and chaise — or more strictly a weatherbeaten chair, once built for a chaise-body -in the direction of Boston, but never
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
f the teacher. He then gave up the school and devoted his time to the study of philosophy and reforms, and later moved to Concord, Mass., where he founded the so-called school of philosophy, and became one of its leaders. He contributed to The Dial and published Tablets (1868), Concord days (1872), Table talk (1877), Sonnets and Canzonets (1882), and an Essay (1865), presented to Emerson on his birthday. Emerson had a great veneration for him. Died in Boston, Mass., March 4, 1888. Austin, William Born in Charlestown, Mass., March 2, 1778. He graduated from Harvard in 1798, studied law, and became eminent as a practitioner. Spending some time in England, he published, as a result, Letters from London, (1804). His works include Oration on the anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill (1801) ; Essay on the human character of Jesus Christ (1807); and his most famous story, Peter Rugg, the Missing man, originally contributed to the New England Galaxy (1824-26), of which he was ed
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Arnold, Matthew, 266, 283. Arthur Gordon Pym, Poe's, 208. Arthur Mervyn, Brown's, 70. Astoria, Irving's, 240. Astronomical diary and almanac, Ames's, 58. Atlantic monthly, 106, 132, 133, 158, 162. Audubon, John James, 239. Austin, William, 187. Autocrat of the breakfast table, Holmes's, 157, 158. Bancroft, George, 87, 111, 117, 143. Barclay of Ury, Whittier's, 147. Barlow, Joel, 38. Battle of the Kegs, Hopkinson's, 55. Baudelaire, 208. Beauclerc, Lady, Diana, 1Parkman, Francis, 98, 118-121. Peter, 239. Parton, James, 119. Pater, Walter, 166. Pathfinder, Cooper's, 99. Pendennis, Thackeray's, 258. Penn, William, 74, 147. Pepper, Colonel, 235. Perkins, Eli, 243. Peter Rugg, the Missing man, Austin's, 187-189. Phi Beta Kappa, 155. Philanthropist, 149, 150. Phillips, Katharine, 12. Phillips, Wendell, 10, 43, 270. Piatt, John James, 264. Pickard, Samuel T., 150. Pickering, Thomas, 65. Pickwick papers, Dickens's, 90. Pinkney, Ed
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
task of offering opposition to the mother country—a task in itself not without its incongruous aspect. During the period that followed the Revolution the colonists doubtless told their stories of war and sea, swapped yarns, and recounted deeds of adventure along the frontier, but little has remained to show the character of the writing and to enable us to know what impression it made upon the time. There was not a little humorous political and satirical verse. Certain writers, like William Austin, Irving, Paulding, Drake, Halleck, Sands, Verplanck, brought into American literature an estimable sort of humour, but little was produced by any of them that had an emphatically native quality. About the time of Andrew Jackson, along with the birth of popular national self-consciousness, the emergence of the frontier as a social entity in the nation's imagination, and the rise to power of the newspaper (for almost without exception the professional American humorists have been newspa
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
ysticism. From out of it all but a single figure has survived, the sombre Hawthorne See also Book II, Chap. XI. Here may be mentioned, however, one short story before Hawthorne which seems rather to anticipate him than to follow Irving, William Austin's tantalizing Peter Rugg,the Missing man, of which the first part appeared in 1824. [For Austin, see also the Bibliography for Book II, Chap. XIX.] who was genius enough to turn even the stuff of the annuals into a form that was to persist Austin, see also the Bibliography for Book II, Chap. XIX.] who was genius enough to turn even the stuff of the annuals into a form that was to persist and dominate. Hawthorne added soul to the short story and made it a form that could be taken seriously even by those who had contended that it was inferior to the longer forms of fiction. He centred his effort about a single situation and gave to the whole tale unity of impression. Instead of elaboration of detail, suggestion; instead of picturings of external effects, subjective analysis and psychologic delineation of character. Hawthorne was the first to lift the short story into the highe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
al physics considered with reference to natural theology, 221 As you like it, 12 At close range, 392 At Fredericksburg, 281 Atlanta Constitution, the, 321-322, 350 Atlantic magazine, the, 167 Atlantic monthly, the, 47, 165, 169, 228, 247, 331, 369 n., 371, 372, 373, 375, 378, 379, 385, 388, 401 Atlantic Souvenir, the, 171, 173 At Sundown, 46, 228 Attack, the, 282 At the sign of the ship, 356 n. At Timrod's grave, 326 Auf Wiedersehen, 242 Aurora, the, 181 Austin, William, 150 Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, The (New England magazine), 165 Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, the, 225, 228, 233, 234, 235 Axe to Grind, the, 215 Bakhuysen van der Brink, R. C., 138, 139 Bache , B. F., 181 Backward Glance O'Er Travel'd Roads, a, 272 Bacon, Delia, 57 n. Bacon, Lord, 124, 234, 236 Bagby, George W., 153, 316, 318, 320 Balaam and his master, 388 Baldwin, Joseph Glover, 154 Ballad of New Orleans, the, 278, 282 Ballad of trees and t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
han Sewall died Nov. 12, 1839, in his seventy-fourth year. who lives about three miles from the city in a beautiful country seat, who treated me very civilly. I am engaged to dine with him en famille to-morrow. He is a very polite and sensible old gentleman. His conversation was very agreeable. When I shall arrive at Boston I can hardly tell,—perhaps next Saturday. Who knows but I may be finally baffled, and run the race of Peter Rugg? Peter Rugg, the Missing Man,—a tale of which William Austin, a friend of Sumner's father, was the author. That I am the missing man you are, I presume, ready to cry out. I hope you have had comfortable weather; most delightful for travelling we have had, but cold. Perhaps here on the frozen loins of the North, the weather, herald of icy winters, has appeared sooner than with us, nearer the sun as we are. Remember me to my friends. I rejoice with you in the Harvard celebration of to-day, and shall drink a glass of wine to you and old Harvard
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