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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ham, author of Treatise on the Law of Infancy and Coverture. He invited Sumner to dine in Dec., 1838, at 34 Mecklenburgh Square; and on another occasion when Charles Austin was to be his guest. the reporter,—a most able man, and friend of Jeremy Bentham,—to meet Austin and some of the philosophical Radicals; to-morrow with TalbotAustin and some of the philosophical Radicals; to-morrow with Talbot, John Chetwynd Talbot, 1806-1852. He married a daughter of Lord Wharncliffe, and was Attorney-General to the Prince of Wales, and Recorder of Windsor. the son of Earl Talbot, to meet undoubtedly a Tory party; next day (being Sunday) to breakfast and pass the day with Roebuck, and to dine with Leader, the member for Westminstehat footing. It was only night before last that I dined at his house. We had at table Sir Frederick Pollock, Serjeant Talfourd, Theodore Hook, 1788-1844. Charles Austin,—one of the cleverest, most enlightened, and agreeable men in London,—and Crowder, the Queen's counsel. Talfourd Thomas Noon Talfourd, 1795-1854. He ent
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
n Irish affairs nearly upset the ministry; Charles Austin (the first lawyer in England, mejudice); G not know if I have ever written you about Charles Austin. He is a more animated speaker than Foller of Theodore Hook, or the correct tone of Charles Austin; but he has a power, a fulness of informatl the tribe of authoresses that I have met. Mrs. Austin I have seen frequently, and recently passedent. In this connection I must speak of Charles Austin, The career of Charles Austin, to whom p. 76-79, 118, 124, 126. At the University, Austin certainly was the only man who ever succeeded f her husband, said: I was glad to read of Charles Austin, whose talk I always placed, as you do, foBench and Bar. I left off with Follett and Charles Austin. I wish to add, that I think Follett has not astonish one like Follett. I still think Austin, taking all things into consideration, the gre the Attorney-General, Follett, Wilde, and Charles Austin. In the next rank to these, but differing[9 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De Vere, and De Clifford; and of works on international law and other subjects. son of Tremaine Ward, and M. P., whose motion on Irish affairs nearly upset the ministry; Charles Austin (the first lawyer in England, mejudice); Gibbon Wakefield; Edward Gibbon Wakefield, 1796-1862. He was an author of books on colonial questions, and private secretary of the Earl of Durham in Canada in 1839. He died in New Zealand, with wlic man they have ever met,—remarkable for his ease, simplicity, and the readiness with which he unfolded himself. Buller says that Van Buren had the handsomest shoes and stockings he ever saw! I do not know if I have ever written you about Charles Austin. He is a more animated speaker than Follett,—perhaps not so smooth and gentle; neither is he, I think, so ready and instinctively sagacious in a law argument: and yet he is powerful here, and is immeasurably before Follett in accomplishments<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
Jan. 16, 1839. This London is socially a bewitching place. Last evening I first dined with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passBrougham is not agreeable at dinner. He is, however, more interesting than any person I have met. He has not the airy graces and flow of Jeffrey, the piercing humor of Sydney Smith, the dramatic power of Theodore Hook, or the correct tone of Charles Austin; but he has a power, a fulness of information and physical spirits, which make him more commanding than all! His great character and his predominating voice, with his high social and intellectual qualities, conspire to give him such an influ
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
teach Montague or Walpole many lessons in finance.—Essay on Milton. productions. I have met her repeatedly, and received from her several kind attentions. She is the most ladylike and motherly of all the tribe of authoresses that I have met. Mrs. Austin I have seen frequently, and recently passed an evening at her house. She is a fine person,—tall, well-filled, with a bright countenance slightly inclined to be red. She has two daughters who have just entered society. She is engaged in transat was my gratification, a short time since, while dining with Parkes, to find that it was gotten up and carried on by my friends. The nominal editor was Southern, now Secretary of Legation at Madrid; but its chief supporters were Parkes and Charles Austin and Montagu. It was established by the Radicals, to show that they were at least not ignorant of literature. Parkes wrote the articles on the prose writings of Milton. He is a subscriber to the North American, and has been much pleased wit
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
st. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the, and is still (1877) pursuing his vocation. the historians; of these two, Ranke pleases me the most: he has the most vivacity, humor, and, I should think, genius, and is placed before Raumer here. You doubtless know his History of the Popes; Mrs. Austin is translating it in England. Humboldt Alexander von Humboldt, 1769-1859. At the time of Sumner's visit, he had recently published his Critical Examination of the Geography of the New Continent. The first volume of the Cosmos appeared in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
in the letter: He (Mr. Webster) talked with great respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating Macaulay's or Dr. Channing's. Parkes wishes me to take to Emerson the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
It was pleasant to meet again those dearest to him,—Ingham, Morpeth, and Parkes,—and also to renew his association with Austin, Sydney Smith, Milman, Hayward, Milnes, Inglis, the Grotes, Rogers, and others. He failed to see Lord Brougham, who was of Sutherland in her magnificent palace; Stafford House, St. James's. for the next day to dine with Parkes to meet Charles Austin; the next to breakfast with Sutton Sharpe (his capital breakfasts!) to meet some of my friends of the Chancery bar; t you in the Law Magazine are by Calvert, a very nice, gentlemanly person. He has another in type on your Bailments. Charles Austin is as brilliant and clever as ever,—all informed, and master of his own profession: take him all in all, the greatests. Norton; Lady Seymour (both very beautiful); Hayward; Sydney Smith; Senior; Fonblanque; Milnes; Milman; the Grotes; Charles Austin (more brilliant than ever); the Wortleys, &c. But I must stop. I must go now to breakfast with Sydney Smith; to-morr<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
ltivate his friendship. He will advise with you about your travels in the country and in Ireland, where he has been. I also inclose a line for Joseph Parkes, a solicitor by profession, but one of the most learned lawyers in England, a strong Radical, a friend of the late Jeremy Bentham and Lord Durham, who takes a great interest in American affairs. He will take you to the Houses of Commons and Lords. Through him you may become acquainted with all the Radicals, —the Grotes, Roebuck, Charles Austin, Sir William Molesworth, Leader, &c. You will, of course, see Kenyon, who is a very good friend of mine. In a recent letter, introducing Dickens, he inquires after you. Dr. Bowring lives quite retired. He may invite you to breakfast. I often dined with Senior, or met him at dinner. He has remarkable powers, but is cold and logical. Who would have thought that he was the most interesting reviewer of Walter Scott's novels? Perhaps you have letters to Mr. Bates, You will find him a