Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for James T. Austin or search for James T. Austin in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
arrison came to his support by reprinting the article in the Liberator (5: 32). For the subsequent stages in this cause celebre see Lib. 5.36, 56, 107, 112. An extract has already been made (ante, 1: 478) from Mr. Garrison's comments on Attorney-General Austin's argument at the June term. The article now in question (Lib. 5.199) was concerned with the same lawyer's argument on the appeal, on Nov. 4, 1835. In the course of it the recent victim of an atrocious mob declared—I believe that all tation. A sharp Review of Dr. Channing's book has just appeared, Remarks on Dr. Channing's slavery. Two editions were sold within a fortnight (Lib. 6.3). It was reviewed in turn by Mr. Garrison in Lib. 6.11. said to be from the pen of James T. Austin, the famous Attorney-General in the case of Mr. Cheever. Of course I have Ante, pp. 63, 64. not had time to read it. The anti-slavery debate in Congress Over the reception of petitions for the abolition of Slavery in the District of
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
pised abolitionists. The aldermen, who at first refused the use of Faneuil Hall for an indignation meeting, and Attorney-General Austin, who desecrated the hall afresh by declaring that Lovejoy had died as the fool dieth, were surprised by the demoe to its traditions and its class, Lib. 7.198. justified the authorities in their refusal of Faneuil Hall. So, Attorney-General Austin, excusing the Alton riot by Lib. 7.202. the Boston tea-riot, recalled Peleg Sprague's pointing to that slavehoThe gentleman said that he should sink into insignificance if he dared to gainsay the principles of these resolutions. Austin declared them the familiar doctrines of our bill of rights in language weakened by expansion, and only objectionable in tent introductory remarks. Wendell Phillips, George Bond, and Geo. S. Hillard also made admirable speeches. The Attorney-General Austin's speech was as vile and inflammatory as possible, and came very [near] producing a mobocratic explosion. He wa
phia, Dec. 25, 1836, in 38th year], early friend to G., 1.203; delegate Nat. A. S. Convention, 398, committeeman, 399, report, 406. Aurora (Norwich), 2.99. Austin, James Trecothic [1784-1870], on the higher law, 1.478; invited to Faneuil Hall meeting, 487; prosecution of Cheever, 1.478, 2.64, 68; reviews Channing's Essay, 6Essay on slavery in press, 90, appears, 1.439, 466, 2.54, praised by E. G. Loring, 55, censured by G., 54, 57, 61, 65, 66, 84, 86, 89-93, by Phelps, 62, 63, by J. T. Austin, 68, by Goodell, 89, 91-93, by J. Q. Adams, 91; shakes hands with G., 94, 96, 97; host of H. Martineau, 97, 98; sermons described by G., 98, 106; letter to Birnt from E. G. Loring, 55; joins abolitionists, 129, 193; first A. S. speech, 129, 137, tribute to and from G., 129, 249; stirred by Lovejoy's death, 185, reply to Austin, 189; at Peace Convention, 229; tribute to Lib., 240, 263, 330; president of Boston A. S. S., 243; at Worcester Convention, 245; speech at State House, 249; to ed