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as still a small force in Montgomery county, who made their appearance in Christiansburg on Friday last, made a short stay, and then retired in the direction of Blacksburg. Some prisoners who were taken in the fight between Morgan's cavalry and Averill say that the latter was defeated with severe loss.--Averill himself received a slight wound in the head. The fight took place about six miles from Wytheville, on the road from Tazewell, on Monday week. The enemy's force was composed of a portiAverill himself received a slight wound in the head. The fight took place about six miles from Wytheville, on the road from Tazewell, on Monday week. The enemy's force was composed of a portion of the main body of the raiders, which was sent off as a diversion, while the larger force went towards the New River bridge. It is believed that the enemy's entire force in Southwestern Virginia is not loss than eight thousand men. The party which attacked Dublin and the New River bridge was under command of Gen. Cook, and numbered about five thousand men, with twelve pieces of artillery. Incidents of last week's fighting. The Charlottesville Chronicle, has some readable incidents
eived yesterday early in the day the gratifying news that Gen. Breckinridge had whipped the German Red Republican Gen. Sigel, in a fight which took place near New Market, in Shenandoah county. His forces must have been badly routed, as they are represented as fleeing from the field across the north branch of the Shenandoah, which was near at hand, and burning the bridge after them. Of the relative number of men engaged in the battle we are not in formed. But it must have been extraordinary if the enemy did not outnumber us.--Sigel's column was a part of the combined movement for our final subjugation, as was also Averill's. Both of them have been defeated, and thus falls three of the minor heads of the monster, Sheridan's raid constituting the third. The brave Confederates are lopping them off one after another. Let us hope that in a few days at least some of the larger ones, with more force and vitality, will fall to the ground and be crushed under the heel of the Confederacy.