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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 28 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 12 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 6 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Avery or search for Avery in all documents.

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thy of American diplomacy, and would bring shame and dishonor on any government or people that gave it their sanction. At the last Democratic National Convention, which met at Charleston, April 23, 1860, while discord reigned with regard to candidates and the domestic planks of their platform, there was one topic whereon a perfect unanimity was demonstrated. In the brief platform of the majority was embodied the following: Resolved, That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisition of the island of Cuba, on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves and just to Spain. This resolve was first reported to the Convention by Mr. Avery, of N. C., from the majority of the grand Committee, was accepted on all hands, and was unanimously adopted by the bolting, or Breckinridge, as well as by the Douglas, or majority, Convention. It thus forms about the only surviving and authentic article of the Democratic creed, and may serve as the nucleus of a grand reconstruction.
w York and the Douglas men from Illinois. On the fourth, no progress was made. On the fifth, Mr. Avery, of North Carolina, from a majority of the Committee on Platform (17 to 14), but representing e hostile in character, subversive of the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. Mr. Avery's report from the majority was ultimately modified by him so as to read as follows: Resolvtives, in Committee, of each of the fifteen Slave States, with those of California and Oregon. Mr. Avery, in introducing it, very frankly and fairly set forth its object, and the grounds of differenctor Bayard, of Delaware, in the chair — and adopted the platform reported to the Convention by Mr. Avery, as aforesaid; and, after four days deliberations, adjourned to meet at Richmond, Va., on the one States were fully or partially represented. Hon. Caleb Cushing was chosen its President. Mr. Avery, of North Carolina, submitted his Charleston platform, which was unanimously adopted. It was
ates, The, proverty of at close of Revolution, 18; obstacles to transportation in, 19. Aughey, Rev. John A., of Miss., reference to, 350; extract from his Iron furnace, 514. Augusta, Ga., seizure of the Federal Arsenal, 411; a letter from, in testimony of the common use of deadly weapons by the Southrons, 500. Agusta (Ga.) Chronicle, The, extract from, 123; citation from. Death to the Abolitionist, 128; citation from, 347. Austin, Moses, 148. Austin, Stephen, F., 148; 150. Avery, William W., of N. C., 278; his resolves in the Democratic National Convention, 309-10; his speech there, 311; 318. Avis, camp. John, referred to in one of John Brown's letters, 296; his treatment of old Brown, 289. Ayres, Capt., engaged at Blackburn's Ford, 539. B. Badger, George E., of N. C., wants liberty to take his old mammy to Kansas, 231; 2:32. Baker, Col. Edward D., 422; reinforces Col. Devens at Ball's Bluff, 622; his death, 623; orders from Gen. Stone to, 624.