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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 260 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 24 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 24 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 7 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Ayres or search for Ayres in all documents.

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my cavalry, which meanwhile had been joined by Ayres's division of the Fifth Corps by way of the Bost worn out, Warren reported his troops ready, Ayres's division being formed on the west side of thne could be turned. I therefore intended that Ayres and Crawford should attack the refused trencheular to the road, keeping closed to the left. Ayres did his part well, and to the letter, bringingm the return, thus isolating his division from Ayres; and Griffin, uncertain of the enemy's positioordering the attack, and caused a gap between Ayres and Crawford, of which the enemy quickly took advantage, and succeeded in throwing a part of Ayres's division into confusion. At this juncture Ithen by Colonel Sherman--to come to the aid of Ayres, who was now contending alone with that part ohing across Crawford's rear, he quickly joined Ayres, who meanwhile had rallied his troops and carried the return. When Ayres's division went over the flank of the enemy's works, Devin's divisio[1 more...]
vernment, compelled him to hold on to Richmond and Petersburg till the afternoon of the 2d, though before that Parke, Ord, and Wright had carried his outer intrenchments at several points, thus materially shortening the line of investment. The night of the 1st of April, General Humphreys's corps — the Second-had extended its left toward the White Oak road, and early next morning, under instructions from General Grant, Miles's division of that corps reported to me, and supporting him with Ayres's and Crawford's divisions of the Fifth Corps, I then directed him to advance toward Petersburg and attack the enemy's works at the intersection of the Claiborne and White Oak roads. Such of the enemy as were still in the works Miles easily forced across Hatcher's Run, in the direction of Sutherland's depot, but the Confederates promptly took up a position north of the little stream, and Miles being anxious to attack, I gave him leave, but just at this time General Humphreys came up with