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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 260 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 24 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 24 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 7 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Ayres or search for Ayres in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
the strength of each corps present for duty equipped on April 30. corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1stWadsworthPhelps, Cutler, Paul, Meredith1052 ReynoldsRobinsonRoot, Baxter, Leonard 16,908DoubledayRowley, Stone 2dHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook, Brook848 CouchGibbonSully, Owen, Hall 16,893FrenchCarroll, Hays, MacGregor 3dBirneyGraham, Ward, Hayman954 SicklesBerryCarr, Revere, Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 11thDevensVon Gilsa, McLean636 HowardVon SteinwehrBuschbeck, Barlow 12,977SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski 12th528 SlocumWilliamsKnipe, Ross, Ruger 13,450GearyCandy, Kane, Greene CavalryPleasontonDavis, Devin522 StonemanAverellSargent, McIntosh GreggKilpatrick, Wyndham
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
per cent for Cavalry. Army of the Potomac. Present for duty, June 30, 1863 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, Kelley, Zook, Brook HancockGibbonHarrow, Webb, Hall 13,056HaysCarroll, Smyth, Willard524 3d CorpsBirneyGraham, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brewster, Burling530 5th CorpsBarnesTilton, Sweitzer, Vincent SykesAyresDay, Burbank, Weed 12,211CrawfordMcCandless, Fisher526 6th CorpsWrightTorbert, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocum 8,597GearyCandy, Cobham, Greene420 2,568TylerArtillery Reserve21110 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY 2,580Engineers, Provost Guard's Escorts 100,2837 Corp
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
ven. Lang's brigade. Wright's brigade. Wright carries the Stone wall. Wright's retreat. reinforcements for Sickles. Ayres's division. Confederate situation. the artillery engaged. ten more brigades in sight. Crawford's advance. Ewell's Coross, 330; Kelley, 198; Brook, 389; Zook, 358; total, 1275. While Caldwell was in the stress of action, Sykes advanced Ayres's division of three brigades, sending Weed to the left to the aid of Vincent; and the two brigades of regulars, under Day running south through marshy ground. The tide of battle rolled back and forth across this field several times, and when Ayres's regulars were driven back and pursued, Sykes ordered forward his last division, Crawford's, called the Pa. Reserves, twopes of which Crawford's division now advanced in a counter-stroke to the Confederate charge which had routed and pursued Ayres's division. The mere sight of the long lines and solid blue masses which appeared to the Confederates as they cleared th
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
vermore's Estimate3,90318,7355,42528,063 Federal casualties. Gettysburg by divisions COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Wadsworth2991,2296272,155 Robinson916169831,690 Rowley2651,2965412,103 Wainwright's Arty.98611106 1st Corps6663,1312,1626,059 Caldwell1878802081,275 Gibbon3441,2121011,647 Hays238987661,291 Hazard's Arty.271193149 2d Corps7973,1943784,369 Birney2711,3843562,011 Humphreys3141,5622162,092 Randolph's Arty.88117106 3d Corps5933,0295894,211 Barnes167594142904 Ayres164802631,029 Crawford261813210 Martin832243 5th Corps3651,6112112,187 Federal casualties. Gettysburg by divisions COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Wright11718 Howe212216 Newton2014828196 Tompkins's Arty.4812 6th Corps2718530242 Barlow1226775071,306 Steinwehr107507332946 Schurz1336846591476 Osborn's Arty.753969 11th Corps3691,9221,5103,801 Williams9640631533 Geary10839735540 Muhlenberg's Arty.99 12th Corps214812661,082 Arty. Reserve4318712242 Gen. Headquarters44 Cav
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
taff, said to Col. Venable, Lee's aid, Does not it make the General proud to see how these men love him? Venable answered, Not proud. It awes him. He rode along our lines close enough to look into our faces and then we marched in review and went back to our camps. Army of the Potomac, May 4, 1864 2D corps. Hancock DIVISIONSBRIGADESartillery BarlowMilesSmythFrankBrookeTidball GibbonWebbOwenCarroll10 Batts. BirneyWardHayes60 Guns MottMcAllester Brewster 5TH corps. Warren GriffinAyresSweitzerBartlettWainwright RobinsonLeonardBaxterDennison9 Batts. CrawfordMcCandlessFisher54 Guns WadsworthCutlerRiceStone 6TH corps. Sedgwick, Wright WrightBrownRussellUptonShalerTompkins GettyWheatonGrantNeillEustis9 Batts. RickettsMorrisSeymour54 Guns 9TH corps. Burnside, Parke StevensonCarruthLeasureEdwards PotterBlissGriffin14 Batts. WillcoxHartranftChrist84 Guns FerreroSigfriedThomas reserve artillery. Hunt 26 Batts. 106 Guns cavalry. Sheridan TorbertCusterDevinRes.B
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
ossed the open spaces behind, under fire from the guns upon both flanks and infantry as well. This retreat under such severe fire was seen in the Federal lines, just in time to put a stop to an attack upon our right flank, about to be made by Ayres's division of Warren's corps, which had been ordered to capture the one-gun battery on our right, as they called the one at which Gibbes had been wounded. Humphreys calls this a two-gun battery. There were two embrasures and two guns, but only one used. The other did not bear where desired. There was very little infantry supporting this gun, or able to reach it, without exposure. Ayres's attack would probably have been successful. He was about to go forward, when Meade directed all offensive operations to cease. Wright's brigade arriving about half-past 11, Mahone made a second attack, which was repulsed with the aid of the Federal artillery bearing upon the ground. Between 1 and 2 P. M., Sanders's brigade having arrived