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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 260 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 24 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 24 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 7 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ayres or search for Ayres in all documents.

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p much force, as the rear of Hill's corps was arriving almost at the same time with the head of Warren's column. Immediately on crossing, Griffin's division was formed in line of battle, the Second brigade (Sweitzer's), having the advance, while Ayres took position on his left, and Bartlett was held in reserve in the centre of the line. Cutler's division formed on the right of Griffin, and Crawford's (Pennsylvania Reserves), on his left. Moving rapidly up across an open space of six or eighting bullets. Captain Keene, Twentieth Maine regiment, was shot by one of these sharpshooters, and instantly killed. Lieutenant Denvers, Twentieth Pennsylvania, dismounted cavalry, was severely but not dangerously wounded. This morning Brigadier-General Ayres, commanding the Second division, while inspecting his front line, had two narrow escapes from the bullets of sharpshooters. One bullet hit his right thumb, and another just grazed his face ; and during some cannonading in the early part
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25-- (search)
with precipitous banks, and the men had to wade it waist deep. The rebels appear not to have expected that the passage would be made so high up the stream, and hence had no great force in the immediate vicinity. In fact they had no time to bring up much force, as the rear of Hill's corps was arriving almost at the same time with the head of Warren's column. Immediately on crossing, Griffin's division was formed in line of battle, the Second brigade (Sweitzer's), having the advance, while Ayres took position on his left, and Bartlett was held in reserve in the centre of the line. Cutler's division formed on the right of Griffin, and Crawford's (Pennsylvania Reserves), on his left. Moving rapidly up across an open space of six or eight hundred yards, Griffin took position in the woods, where a heavy skirmish line was soon met. At first the only rebel troops in the neighborhood consisted of McGowan's brigade, of Wilcox's division (Hill's corps), under command of Colonel Brown, of t
ntersection with the Boydton plank, and pushed Ayres' division in a north-westerly direction over tford and Griffin within supporting distance of Ayres, whose position on the extreme left was considtack. On the thirty-first, about ten A. M., Ayres, under General Warren's orders, advanced to di the enemy in position on the White Oak road. Ayres' attack was unsuccessful, and was followed by such a vigorous attack of the enemy that Ayres was compelled to fall back upon Crawford, who, in tuffin's division, supported by such portions of Ayres' and Crawford's divisions as could be rallied, and regaining the position held by Ayres in the morning, Griffin attacked with Chamberlain's brigas infantry in front of Dinwiddie Court-house. Ayres' division moved down the Boydton plank-road duordered an advance in the following formation: Ayres' division on the left in double lines, Crawforeward of the Government. To Generals Griffin, Ayres, Bartlett, and Crawford, of the Fifth corps, a