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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacon, Delia, 1811- (search)
Bacon, Delia, 1811- Author; born in Tallmadge, O., Feb. 2, 1811; a sister of Dr. Leonard Bacon (q. v.). She published in 1857 The Philosophy of Shakespeare's plays, in which she put forth the hypothesis that these plays were not written by Shakespeare, but by Sir Francis Bacon. She died in Hartford, Conn., Sept. 2, 185,9.
Well, I have received a sweet note from Jenny Lind, with her name and her husband's with which to head my subscription list. They give a hundred dollars. Another hundred is subscribed by Mr. Bowen in his wife's name, and I have put my own name down for an equal amount. A lady has given me twenty-five dollars, and Mr. Storrs has pledged me fifty dollars. Milly and I are to meet the ladies of Henry's and Dr. Cox's churches to-morrow, and she is to tell them her story. I have written to Drs. Bacon and Dutton in New Haven to secure a similar meeting of ladies there. I mean to have one in Boston, and another in Portland. It will do good to the givers as well as to the receivers. But all this time I have been so longing to get your letter from New Haven, for I heard it was there. It is not fame nor praise that contents me. I seem never to have needed love so much as now. I long to hear you say how much you love me. Dear one, if this effort impedes my journey home, and wastes some
As soon as it can be got ready for the press I shall have it printed, and shall send a copy to every minister in the country. Our lectures have been somewhat embarrassed by a pressure of new business brought upon us by the urgency of the Kansas-Nebraska question. Since we began, however, brother Edward has devoted his whole time to visiting, consultation, and efforts the result of which will shortly be given to the public. We are trying to secure a universal arousing of the pulpit. Dr. Bacon's letter is noble. You must think so. It has been sent to every member of Congress. Dr. Kirk's sermon is an advance, and his congregation warmly seconded it. Now, my good friend, be willing to see that the church is better than you have thought it. Be not unwilling to see some good symptoms, and hope that even those who see not at all at first will gain as they go on. I am acting on the conviction that you love the cause better than self. If anything can be done now advantageously by th
owe :-- Natick, July 14, 1839. I have had a real good time this week writing my oration. I have strolled over my old walking places, and found the same old stone walls, the same old footpaths through the rye-fields, the same bends in the river, the same old bullfrogs with their green spectacles on, the same old terrapins sticking up their heads and bowing as I go by; and nothing was wanting but my wife to talk with to make all complete. ... I have had some rare talks with old uncle Jaw Bacon, and other old characters, which you ought to have heard. The Curtises have been flooding Uncle Jaw's meadows, and he is in a great stew about it. He says: I took and tell'd your Uncle Izic to tell them 'ere Curtises that if the Devil did n't git 'em far flowing my medder arter that sort, I did n't see no use oa havina any Devil. Have you talked with the Curtises yourself? Yes, hang the sarcy dogs! and they took and tell'd me that they'd take and flow clean up to my front door, and make
form mountebank tricks with tables and chairs; to recite over in weary sameness harmless truisms, which we were wise enough to say for ourselves; to trifle, and banter, and jest, or to lead us through endless moonshiny mazes. Sadly and soberly we say that, if this be communion with the dead, we had rather be without it. We want something a little in advance of our present life, and not below it. We have read with some attention weary pages of spiritual communication purporting to come from Bacon, Swedenborg, and others, and long accounts from divers spirits of things seen in the spirit land, and we can conceive of no more appalling prospect than to have them true. If the future life is so weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable as we might infer from these readings, one would have reason to deplore an immortality from which no suicide could give an outlet. To be condemned to such eternal prosing would be worse than annihilation. Is there, then, no satisfaction for this craving
and never can be young in this world, now that the friends of those days are almost all in eternity, what remains? Through life and through death, through sorrowing, through sinning, Christ shall suffice me as he hath sufficed. Christ is the end and Christ the beginning, The beginning and end of all is Christ. I was passionate in my attachments in those far back years, and as I have looked over files of old letters, they are all gone (except one, C. Van Rensselaer), Georgiana May, Delia Bacon, Clarissa Treat, Elisabeth Lyman, Sarah Colt, Elisabeth Phenix, Frances Strong, Elisabeth Foster. I have letters from them all, but they have been long in spirit land and know more about how it is there than I do. It gives me a sort of dizzy feeling of the shortness of life and nearness of eternity when I see how many that I have traveled with are gone within the veil. Then there are all my own letters, written in the first two years of marriage, when Mr. Stowe was in Europe and I was l
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
he best work that he ever did, but in a state much inferior to that in which he ultimately left it. During the ensuing four years Poe seems to have made his home in Baltimore, though it is impossible to trace his history with complete certainty throughout this period. Much of his time, no doubt, was given to his prose tales, five of which appeared in the Philadelphia Saturday Courier, in 1832, These stories were originally submitted in competition for a prize—won, as it happens, by Delia Bacon. and a sixth—for which he won a prize of a hundred dollars—in the Baltimore Saturday Visiter in October, 1833; and he also worked at intervals during these years on a play, Politian, which, though published in part, was never completed. That he lived in poverty and in much obscurity is evident from the reminiscences of John Pendleton Kennedy, the novelist, Tuckerman, Life of Kennedy, pp. 373 f. who had been one of the judges in the Visiter's contest in 1833 and who now proved his mos<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
very defective. He had no well-based accurate knowledge of English, let alone modern languages. Accordingly, on 30 October, 1821, he planned a preliminary course to lay accurate foundations for a literary career. Blair's Rhetoric, Lindley Murray, the introductory chapter of Johnson's Dictionary were studied as though the student were a small schoolboy instead of a Harvard graduate of seven years standing. At the same time he ploughed through a long course of English literature. Ascham, Bacon, Browne, Raleigh, and Milton, besides the sermons of eminent divines, were read to him in chronological series, while he used his own sight for an hour of Latin daily. At the end of the year he felt he had broken ground only. A temporary improvement in his eye enabled him to plunge into French authors from Froissart to Chateaubriand, still devoting a part of each day to hearing English drama from Heywood to Dryden. With his friend Ticknor, Prescott kept up a third line of English reading
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
odel, this is plainly enough the eighteenth-century essay, invented by Steele, improved by Addison, clumsily attempted by Johnson, and lightly varied by Goldsmith. Steele is the originator of the form, since the earlier essay of Montaigne and of Bacon makes no use of dialogue; it has only one interlocutor, the essayist himself, recording only his own feelings, his own opinions, and his own judgments. Steele was probably influenced by the English character-writers, perhaps also by the lighter ng philosophy; and it cannot be denied that there are pages here and there which are not as valid today as when they were written. It would be doing the Autocrat an ill-service to compare him with his remote and mighty predecessors Montaigne and Bacon. And it may be admitted that there is more or less warrant for the remark of John Burroughs, to the effect that Holmes always reminded him of certain of our bird songsters, such as the brown thrasher or the cat-bird,whose performances always see
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
e, The (New England magazine), 165 Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, the, 225, 228, 233, 234, 235 Axe to Grind, the, 215 Bakhuysen van der Brink, R. C., 138, 139 Bache , B. F., 181 Backward Glance O'Er Travel'd Roads, a, 272 Bacon, Delia, 57 n. Bacon, Lord, 124, 234, 236 Bagby, George W., 153, 316, 318, 320 Balaam and his master, 388 Baldwin, Joseph Glover, 154 Ballad of New Orleans, the, 278, 282 Ballad of trees and the master, 344 Ballads (Longfellow), 63 Bacon, Lord, 124, 234, 236 Bagby, George W., 153, 316, 318, 320 Balaam and his master, 388 Baldwin, Joseph Glover, 154 Ballad of New Orleans, the, 278, 282 Ballad of trees and the master, 344 Ballads (Longfellow), 63 Ballads and other poems, 36 Ballou, Rev., Hosea, 207 Ballou, Hosea 2d, 207 n. Balzac, 18, 136, 233 Bancroft, George, 110-112, 122, 125, 130, 133, 164, 168, 317 Banner (Nashville), 184 Bannockburn, 298 Barbara Frietchie, 51, 281 Barbauld, Mrs., 397, 400 Barclay of Ury, 48 Barefoot boy, the, 50 Barefooted boys, 307 Barlow, Joel, 150, 207 Barnaby Rudge, 63 Barneveld, John of, 144, 145, 146, 147 Barrow, Washington, 184 Baskervill, W. M., 304 Bassett, John S.
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