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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 3 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union men of Maryland. (search)
The Union men of Maryland. Hon. W. H. Purnell, Ll.D. Yet truth, which only doth judge itself, teacheth that the inquiry of truth, which is the love-making or wooing of it, the knowledge of truth, which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature. Francis Bacon. In our late terrible and bloody civil war, Maryland was claimed by both sides. In each of the contending armies her sons were to be found fighting bravely, and it is well known that her people were much divided in sentiment. The late Henry Winter Davis always indignantly denied that a majority of the people of Maryland were ever, at any time, on the side of secession; and he was deeply hurt by the suspicion and coldness that were sometimes shown by the National authorities in their treatment of his State. He resented, with all the ardor of his nature, the wholesale denunciation that not a few of the Northern papers heaped upon her. He was grieved that the President-elect, Mr. Lincoln, should hav
men lay there loading and firing as deliberately as though on their hunting-grounds at home. All the horses connected with my command were either killed or Wounded, and all my aids and orderlies hit in some way. During the engagement the Eighth Michigan's colors were carried on to the parapet, and after the men first withdrew were unfurled to protect them from shots of friends in the rear. While the fire was hottest, and during the day's action, through the efficient attention of Surgeon Francis Bacon, and Assistant Horace Porter, of the Seventh Connecticut, Surgeon Willson, of the Eighth Michigan, and Surgeon Connell, and Assistant Snow, of the Twenty-eighth Massachusetts volunteers, with their respective corps, speedy relief was afforded to the wounded who were accessible. Orders having been given to that effect, about nine o'clock A. M. this command was withdrawn, and returned to camp in good order. The conduct of all the officers of this command, who came under my notice,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
y of his army — to the morale of half his force — the successful defence of the South and Southwest was essential, and on operations in which he had no voice turned the issue of his campaigns. Of these things account will yet be taken, let us be sure of that; for though in barbarous ages conquered peoples write no histories, yet, as the world grows older,history grows more and mote a judge, less and less a witness and advocate; more and more to every cause that appeal lies open, which Francis Bacon, of Verulam, made to future ages and other countries. Fit is it that we trust to that great verdict, seeing that nothing less than the tribunal of mankind can judge this man, who was born not for a period, but for all time; not for a country, but for the world; not for a people, but for the human race. Not for him shall the Arch of Triumph rise; not for him Columns of Victory, telling through monumental bronze the hideous tale of tears and blood that grins from the skull pyramids o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Samuel Jones of operations at Charleston, South Carolina, from December 5th to 27th, 1864. (search)
Captain I. C. Thompson; two companies of the Thirty-second Georgia, with the Augusta battalion local troops; one company of the First South Carolina infantry, Captain King, and one hundred and thirty South Carolina militia, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Bacon, of the Thirty-second Georgia, and the battalion of South Carolina cadets, commanded by Major J. B. White, making in all seven or eight hundred men. Early in the morning, four companies were thrown forward as skirmishers, under command of Major White. The line, composed of the Forty-seventh Georgia on the right, and the troops under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Bacon, on the left, moved just in rear of the skirmishers. In a thick wood, near a bend in the old Pocotaligo road, the right of my skirmish line struck the enemy. The front was then changed gradually to the right, until the line crossed the said road, at nearly right angles, when it confronted the enemy and became engaged throughout its entire length. At this stage
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacon, Delia, 1811- (search)
Bacon, Delia, 1811- Author; born in Tallmadge, O., Feb. 2, 1811; a sister of Dr. Leonard Bacon (q. v.). She published in 1857 The Philosophy of Shakespeare's plays, in which she put forth the hypothesis that these plays were not written by Shakespeare, but by Sir Francis Bacon. She died in Hartford, Conn., Sept. 2, 185,9.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coke, Sir Edward 1552-1634 (search)
Coke, Sir Edward 1552-1634 Jurist; born at Mileham, Norfolk, England, Feb. 1, 1552; educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, Clifford's Inn, and the Inner Temple; began the practice of law in 1578, and quickly rose to the highest rank. Passing through different grades of judicial office, he became lord chief-justice of England, opposed in his whole course by a powerful rival, Francis Bacon. Coke was a violent and unscrupulous man, and carried his points in court and in politics by sheer audacity, helped by tremendous intellectual force. As attorney-general, he conducted the prosecution of Sir Walter Raleigh with shameful unfairness; and from the beginning of his reign King James I. feared and hated him, but failed to suppress him. Coke was in the privy council and in Parliament in 1621 when the question of monopolies by royal grants was brought before the House in the case of the council of Plymouth and the New England fisheries. Coke took ground against the validity of the pa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence in the light of modern criticism, the. (search)
from Locke's Treatise on government. The author of a life of Jefferson, published in the year of Jefferson's retirement from the Presidency, suggests that the credit of having composed the Declaration of Independence has been perhaps more generally, than truly, given by the public to that great man. Charles Campbell, the historian of Virginia, intimates that some expressions in the document were taken without acknowledgment from Aphra Behn's tragicomedy, The widow-ranter, or the history of Bacon in Virginia. John Stockton Littell describes the Declaration of Independence as that enduring monument at once of patriotism, and of genius and skill in the art of appropriation — asserting that for the sentiments and much of the language of it, Jefferson was indebted to Chief-Justice Drayton's charge to the grand jury of Charleston, delivered in April, 1776, as well as to the Declaration of Independence said to have been adopted by some citizens of Mecklenburg county, N. C., in May, 1775.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831- (search)
Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831- Author; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 3, 1831; removed to Minnesota in 1856; elected lieutenantgovernor of the State in 1859 and 1861; Representative in Congress, 1863-69; president of the State Farmers' Alliance of Minnesota for several years; nominee of the Anti-Fusion People's party for Vice-President of the United States in 1900. He was the author of Atlantis, the Antediluvian world; The Great Cryptogram, in which he undertook to prove by a word cipher that Francis Bacon was the author of Shakespeare's plays; The American people's money, etc. He died in Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 2, 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drummond, William, 1677- (search)
During the Bacon rebellion (see Bacon, Nathaniel), when Berkeley retreated to Accomac, Drummond proposed that Berkeley should be deposed. This proposition met with the favor of the leading planters, who met at Williamsburg and agreed to support Bacon against the government. The death of Bacon left the rebellion without a competent leader. Sir William Berkeley wreaked his vengeance on thirty-three of the principal offenders. When Drummond was brought before him Berkeley exclaimed: I am mored that Berkeley should be deposed. This proposition met with the favor of the leading planters, who met at Williamsburg and agreed to support Bacon against the government. The death of Bacon left the rebellion without a competent leader. Sir William Berkeley wreaked his vengeance on thirty-three of the principal offenders. When Drummond was brought before him Berkeley exclaimed: I am more glad to see you than any man in Virginia. You shall be hanged in half an hour. He died Jan. 20, 1677.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Elizabeth, Queen of England (search)
ifty of the Spanish ships were wrecked. On the death of Leicester the Queen showed decided partiality for the Earl of Essex. Her treatment and final consent to the execution, by beheading, of Mary, Queen of Scots, has left a stain on the memory of Elizabeth. She assisted the Protestant Henry IV. of France in his struggle with the French Roman Catholics, whom Philip of Spain subsidized. Her reign was vigorous, and is regarded as exceedingly beneficial to the British nation. Literature was fostered, and it was illustrated during her reign by such men as Spenser, Shakespeare, Sidney, Bacon, and Raleigh. Elizabeth was possessed of eminent ability and courage, but her personal character was deformed by selfishness, inconstancy, deceit, heartlessness, and other un- Queen Elizabeth. womanly faults. She signified her will on her death-bed that James VI. of Scotland, son of the beheaded Mary, should be her successor, and he was accordingly crowned as such. She died March 24, 1603.
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